SuSE 12.1, extremely long bootup

Hi!

Installed 12.1 about a week ago. Short hardware description:
AMD 3000+
2 GB RAM
ATI Radeon X300SE driver/module radeon
Sound Creative SB live 5.1
Printers Laserjet 1160 & Officejet Pro K550
has served me well through WinXP-7, Debian 4,5 & 6, openSusE 10.3, 11.0-4.

The installation went fairly well, was disappointed with the screen resolution and followed the hints 1-4 i openSuSE SDB. The suggestions to edit /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d worked. Did a modest editition of 50-monitor.conf.

It all went fairly well and my bootup-time was about 90 s till I started to configure the software below. I cannot say exactly when/where it went wrong because I configured them groupwise.

KDar 2.1.0-2.1.x86_64 (installed by default in /opt/kde3/bin which was nor in my, nor roots PATH. Fixed itself automatically after reboot?)
efax-gtk 3.0.15-11.9.x86_64 (the only thing that lacked was a /.lock directory in my users /home)
amarok 2.4.3-8.4.1.x86_64 (the missing mysql database, installed mysql-community below and it worked)
mysql-community-server & -client
nfs-client (In Yast2 fixed a connection to a nfs-share)
Everything, exept KDar are from the recommended repos.

After this my bootup-time is permanently 7-8 minutes?
Watching the boot-text on the screen it sometimes hangs after the line

   12.042362] systemd[1]: [/etc/init.d/cups:19] Failed to add LSB Provides name cupsd.service, ignoring: File exists

sometimes after

    9.054410] Raw EDID:
    9.054420]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
.............
.............
    9.054453]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

Cannot find a way to post a dmesg-file her so I paste an excerpt from the last:

~> dmesg --l=err,warn
    9.054410] Raw EDID:
    9.054420]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.054426]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.054431]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.054435]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.054440]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.054444]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.054449]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.054453]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.054462] radeon 0000:03:00.0: VGA-1: EDID block 0 invalid.
**    9.054466] [drm:radeon_vga_detect] *ERROR* VGA-1: probed a monitor but no|invalid EDID**
    9.109944] Raw EDID:
    9.109954]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.109959]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.109965]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.109970]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.109975]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.109980]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.109985]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.109990]  	00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    9.109998] radeon 0000:03:00.0: VGA-1: EDID block 0 invalid.
**   12.042362] systemd[1]: [/etc/init.d/cups:19] Failed to add LSB Provides name cupsd.service, ignoring: File exists**
   14.645948] ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LMAC] enabled at IRQ 23
   15.725033] sr0: scsi3-mmc drive: 48x/48x writer dvd-ram cd/rw xa/form2 cdda tray

I think the 2 bold lines are central? Have done some internet search and tried removing my edited /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/50-monitor.conf,
starting Failsafe, starting with the option nomodeset. Seems that radeon is active (I’ve reached resolution 1280X1024), graphics are allright, cups is running, network printers (configured in CUPS) are working.

But I cannot make the system boot in a reasonable time!?

Can anyone help?

Regards
Lars

A very BIG caveat with this reply, as I am myself testing 12.1 on multiple machines and so am going on what I’ve read on the mailing lists . . .

First, the radeon driver is failing to read the monitor’s EDID. It is possible that the delay is due to waiting for a reply from the monitor and/or determination/timeout by the driver. If when using Failsafe you are still getting this message, then of course the driver is still being loaded, too. Try temporarily switching to another driver such as vesa or blacklisting radeon and then using Failsafe. Take radeon out of the equation. All that said, given how long the boot time is, I don’t expect this to be the issue.

Rather, I would expect systemd to be the more likely of the two suspects you’ve identified. We’ve seen a lot of boot delay issues, although this has been far more with upgrades than new installs (which did you do, upgrade or fresh install?). IIRC, if a systemd init script encounters a problem, the timeout may be as much as 5 minutes. (Since you re-installed mysql, is there a mysql service that systemd needs to start, and is that being done?) AFAIK systemd cannot be completely removed or uninstalled in the usual way, but init can be re-installed, which will also make init the default:

zypper in sysvinit-init

Supposedly, init can be called at boot rather than systemd by hitting the F5 key. I have not tested this myself. Of course, this assumes init has been installed, which it would not be on a fresh install.

Sorry I can’t be more precise at this time. However, since you haven’t received any replies yet, hopefully this info will be of help.

Good luck.

PS. By the way, you can post a long output with susepaste, it’s here: SUSE Paste . If your output is to too long to fit in terminal memory preventing copy/paste from there, just pipe the output to a file (e.g., dmesg > filename) and then load that file in an editor and copy/paste it from there.

(yesterday night, the 28th, when I tried to answer, Novell’s forum database collapsed)

Dear mingus725, your experience and intuition made you point out the problem directly;)! Thank you!

First of all: I did a fresh install! Sorry not to have mentioned.

But to take your suggestions in order
1.

Try temporarily switching to another driver such as vesa or blacklisting radeon and then using Failsafe.

I never really succeeded there, replacing radeon with vesa in /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/50-device.conf or trying to blacklist it in /etc/modprobe.d/50-blacklist.conf + Failsafe did not work.
Both led to ‘Asparagus’ Kernel with radeon active.

Since you re-installed mysql, is there a mysql service that systemd needs to start, and is that being done

I never reinstalled mysql, I think? there were a few sql-services installed by default, but no server or client. I installed server & client just because Amarok needed them.
Could not find out from ps ax if some mysql service was running, but the full dmesg contained no mentioning of mysql (but Amarok runs with a working database.

I would expect systemd to be the more likely of the two suspects you’ve identified

**You were right! **F5->System V on boot gave a 70 s boot time!:slight_smile:

Concerning your PS: I did just want to put the lines I thought central to my question here (and not “contaminate” the site with endless scrolling through endless outputs ;)!). In other fora there sometimes is a possibility to add an attachment that the interested can read.

It seems that init is being slowly phased out/depreciated and systemd is replacing it? Using System V in SuSE 12.1 feels a bit sneaking in the backdoor. Instead of configuring the systemd bootup sequence?
Concerning
[drm:radeon_vga_detect] ERROR VGA-1: probed a monitor but no|invalid EDID
it would “feel” more constructive if I could find a way to “help” the radeon find the right monitor EDID, (path, or, make the monitor answer, or if the monitor is too old: make radeon stop searching, or anything…)

And concerning the second, that really delayed the boot
systemd[1]: [/etc/init.d/cups:19] Failed to add LSB Provides name cupsd.service, ignoring: File exists: Solve the systemd-cups-problem? Tried to look into it through interpreting "/etc/init.d/cups:19 as line 19 in cups?
The line 19 really concerns cups services, but is commented as are the lines surrounding it?

But in the meantime, you solved a problem that’s been puzzling me for a week!

Finally, do you know a way to make the F5->System V booting more permanent without uninstalling systemd? I want to keep the possibility to boot with systemd but boot with init as default.
I tried to add init=/sbin/init to the kernel line in /boot/grub/menu.lst but it didn’t help, it even prevented F5->SyStem V from being effective. I guess it’s because /sbin/init is symlinked to systemd?
-Do I have to uninstall/remove systemd-sysvinit? Or is it, as you suggested, enough to install sysvinit-init? And, in both cases: Do I have to edit menu.lst?

Best regards

Lars

To change to sysvinit add "init=/sbin/sysvinit to grub’s kernel line. I have similar issues with two systems (slow boot) and changing to sysvinit eliminates the problem. I’m trying (on another thread) to find a solution with systemd, but we are still in testing (see Slow Boot after adding NFS shares)

Thanks elksi!
sysvinit-2.88±66.58.2.x86_64 is installed by default, but not sysvinit–init±66.58.2.x86_64.
Perhaps I have to install sysvinit–init before I make your suggested change in menu.lst?

No there is not need to install sysvinit-init package. Just make the kernel boot entry.

elksi: Thank you again! Tried myself in the meantime. Since I found out that the init=/sbin/sysvinit entry disabled the possibility to boot up with systemd through F5->Systemd (that I wanted to keep as a possibility, but not default) I solved this through making your suggested entry as first, “System V”, boot option in /boot/grub/menu.lst and keeping the original, now called “Systemd”, as second.

Thank you also for your link to Slow Boot after adding NFS shares. I’ll follow it! (Perhaps you read in my first description that one of my uncertainties was if it had been the mounting of a local nfs-share that caused the slow boot)

@Larsed,

I’m glad you were patient - and equally important, received additional help from @elksi (thanks!) - to find a solution. As I posted before, I could not be absolutely certain because a lot of issues and fix suggestions only surfaced a few days before release, and a lot is still changing. For example, “init=/sbin/init” does work sometimes, but not (as you found) when it is symlinked to systemd as it is on new installs. (F5 is just a short-cut that does the same thing as the grub string.) As @elksi pointed out, changing the command string to call sysvinit directly gets around the symlink problem.

Alternatively, the solution to install the sysvinit-init package is recommended in the Most Annoying Bugs list and the Release Notes; this solution recommends (but does not force) the removal of systemd-sysvinit. This should permanently change the default, but it will not actually remove the systemd infrastructure; there are a very large number of package inter-dependencies making that essentially impossible.

A short note to the mods who may see this post: Appears you are already seeing systemd issues. Fasten your seat belts, this could be a very bumpy ride. On the mailing lists there has been a lot of debate about systemd. Fortunately (I guess) for the forums, the potential issues are much greater for server sysadmins upgrading existing installations. That said, and as you are finding, the reason(s) behind the lengthy boot times and possibly some installation issues can be because of some issue encountered by one of the systemd targets (i.e., services). As mentioned above, you’ve seen the NFS startup issue. I’ve also seen discussion indicating a possible Catch-22 if KDE’s Network Manager is used, and other discussion about it possibly affecting the installation/configuration of the X driver. Some are also having issues with runlevels (which no longer exist as such in systemd), although that seems to be with only certain setups. Caveat: I have not personally verified these. What is really complicating the problem is that there is a known bug which blocks systemd from writing to syslog, so we are left with using dmesg which of course is dynamic and therefore messages from targets may have rolled out before we get to debug.

In any event, systemd is here to stay. It has already been adopted in other major distros, and in the long run will be very beneficial because it will standardize a major part of the OS infrastructure across distros. Our project wisely waited for Fedora to shake a lot of it out. But like every other major change, there will be issues initially. For what it’s worth, I’ve found this cheat sheet at Fedora helpful: SysVinit to Systemd Cheatsheet - FedoraProject

Dear mingus725…

Well… what can I say… I didn’t realize I was talking to the Olympians (Aesir if you prefer) ;)! And of course: Thank you again!!

In your both answers you have in a few lines explained something elusive that has caused me much irritation through the last years! Me and a friend, I should say. A friend who normally uses Slackware and is, as such, very experienced. We’ve encountered similar problems -but not always at the same time. For me I think it began with SuSE 11.0. Problems with the so called Autoconfiguration, who neither of us really wanted, but also found that the normal way of some configuring (i.e in texmode, with .conf-files or directories) had disappeared, or no longer worked or not worked fully. The best example I think is the configuration of X. I personally noticed that systemctl and systemd appeared more and more frequent in the bootup sequence, but never connected it with our configuration problems. -We both had a feeling that something was going on ‘under the hood’, something secret that was hard or impossible to find any documentation about, and both felt outdated. -Your lines were really reassuring. There has been something going on! And we are not the only ones meeting problems with it.

A personal reflection I make, aware of that it maybe is too much to ask of an open distribution, but when making such a radical change of a system build-up, wouldn’t it be ‘proper’ to ship it when it reached a better level of functioning? And, wouldn’t it be decent, if the documentation appeared if not simultaneously so in the year coming? -I know that I may sound very spoiled, but if I put it another way:

No one could have been more pleased than me if the SuSE 12.1 installation-DVD opened up with a greeting:
Wellcome! And Beware! You’re now entering the realm of Systemd!

My very best regards
Lars
PS. Thanks also for your link to SysVinit to Systemd Cheatsheet - FedoraProject. I’ll study and try to understand it! DS.

From your post I can see that you have good experience. May I just say that you are the type of user our project welcomes in particular because of the value you add to our community. :slight_smile: These forums are a good place to continue learning.

If your interest is in knowing what is coming in advance and how things work under the hood, IMO the place to start are the mailing lists. Strictly speaking, opensuse-factory and opensuse-kernel are where the development and testing discussions are; if you want to include the desktop environment, add opensuse-kde (or opensuse-gnome). I would also add the opensuse (no suffix) mailing list which is for general user discussion about supported releases; of course when there is a new release there will be a lot of overlap between these, and there is also some overlap between the general discussion list and these forums, with the list much more heavily populated with more experienced users (especially because sysadmins hang out on the lists).

That said, if you join the mailing lists, please do come with your thick skin. :wink: This is “Linux for Adults” (those aren’t my words, it comes from the Project Team). Sometimes the sparks really fly (which is OK), but occasionally someone crosses the line and things get over-heated. All these discussions are one of the primary distinguishing characteristics between openSUSE, Slackware, and Gentoo for example as compared to Fedora and Ubuntu - the latter are much more top-down and controlled because of their heavy commercial backing and because they are upstream to commercial products. OpenSUSE, while having a small core of engineers funded by SUSE, is by far mostly the work of volunteers, so it’s democracy at its best and worst.

As far as documentation, to say the least this is an on-going challenge and subject of much discussion. Frankly, most contributors would rather code or package, and either don’t have the additional time for documentation and/or are just not very good at that. We’re always late with some of it. With systemd, all the man pages are there. Sometimes the challenge is more about the magnitude and nature of the change.

And your related question re releasing at a better level of stability - now that really gets hotly debated. IMO, it’s a conundrum, and it is highly subjective, too. In the first place, it is impossible to identify and resolve all issues in advance because the number of different use cases is literally staggering. It is impossible to test every possible condition, especially given how fast technology is moving and how much is upstream (kernel, KDE/Gnome, samba, apache, hardware, etc., etc.). The project tries to strike a balance between providing new technology and features without being bleeding edge. Fedora has the resources, and it’s community is primarily IT professionals upstream of Red Hat, so it can take on more work and risk. Debian’s hallmark is stability, but at the cost of being behind the tech curve. We try to hit somewhere between the two, more to the Fedora side (bless 'em). And we do take leadership in some areas, e.g., you won’t find a more advanced or better integrated KDE distro than openSUSE.

A second factor is that openSUSE is arguably the broadest distro, functionality wise. In a single release, we support multiple desktops environments as well as servers, with sysadmin tools second to none. We have a build service used by packagers even for other distros. We have Studio for users to easily create their own specialized versions (so does Fedora and Ubuntu, but IMO ours is a lot better). That’s a heckuva lot of work for volunteers.

The third factor is related, and systemd is a great example. There are many in this project who support their own groups or communities of users. Not only have these contributors done a great deal of administrative configuration, but very often have their own init scripts. And by the way, this is going to be an issue with third-parties too, who will have written init scripts for their add-on software, drivers, etc. These folks are the most heated when it comes to major changes like systemd. Generally, their solution is to wait for a couple of months before upgrading, until things shake out. IMO, this is also good advice for brand new desktop users too for whom stability is more important than the newest features; after all, e.g., 11.4 is darned good and rock solid.

Finally, since you liked the cheat sheet (hah!), you might also like to take a look at this (grab hold of something first) openSUSE:Systemd status - openSUSE . Note the “List of Services to Enable”. These are services which have not been natively written for systemd as yet. There is a link there to Fedora where they list their status; they’re still working on them too and we intend to pull as much as possible from that work. Of course, this doesn’t mean these services aren’t included in 12.1, it means they are still being pulled in from init.d except by a different mechanism. This work isn’t trivial, it may take another couple of releases before we get them all. Typically this will be transparent with new installs. There is also a link on that page to the Bugzilla list of all the open bugs for systemd.

Much more than you were looking for, I expect. Well, it’s turned out to be a much longer post than I intended. too. rotfl! Hopefully, the information is useful. And again, welcome!

Again, thank you mingus725!

for your long, extremely encouraging, inviting answer! It has been very stimulating having this discussion with you (starting with long bootups).
I must say that it also was very thought-provoking! In a positive way ;). I feel that continuing this discussion here perhaps is going over the limits of this thread and perhaps also this forum? -Perhaps, if you don’t mind, I’ll send you a mail (over Yahoo, or what?) with all the questions your message raised in my mind?

Therefore only very short here: With my previous occupation i have no problem with the ‘hard skin’ you mentioned. -I think I can fully comprehend the problems with software development, adapt it to the latest hardware (AND software) development, and still making it possible to use on older hardware (me f.i. don’t buy new machines every year), in what stage of development to launch it and in the same time keeping up with documentation! And trying to keep it on ‘the edge’. Here I think I can say that in the commercial it-systemdevelopment sector f.i. SuSE has a reputation of being the Linux distribution ‘on the edge’! A few years ago, among users, also the reputation of having the best documentation. (How I myself came to choose SuSe is another story, perhaps for a mail).

It’s sad that the contributors that code and/or package are so little interested/or having the time to document what they’re doing, or how to use the codes. In my early career I used to write and translate technical manuals in the areas of mechanical engineering and graphical equipment and research and I know how essential it is that you really know-are familiar with-the machine your trying to show how to use! The manuals for home electronic equipment produced under the last decade are perfect illustrations of what I mean. -What I try to say is that, even if my interests touch the realms of making things easy to understand, I could never write a guide to software! Together with my Slackware-friend I 2009/2010 conducted a project “Samba in Swedish”, took us about 9-10 months, method was heavy litterature studies and very much trial and error. The result was publishable ;), think we added something to somewhat, and my friend put parts of it up on the Swedish Slackware-page, the rest we put up on our personal servers. -I think that was a once-in-a-lifetime effort.

Returning to your initial invitation before I really go over all forum limits: I promise I’ll seriously consider it! After doing some browsing I found the the mailing-lists you mentioned, and also a page on community membership. -I noticed the understandable, but restrictive lines

Warning! Please ensure to contribute first to the openSUSE Project then apply for membership.
. -If I decided to try apply, how do I do?

My best regards
Lars

Lars,

As I indicated previously, my lengthy reply was very much an exception because I sensed your interest, conscientiousness, experience, and ability. So in truth my motive was selfish, in that the project always desires to attract such individuals to our community. Since our distro moved from being largely funded by Novell as upstream for its commercial product, to an independent nearly all volunteer project with very limited commercial connection (although that linkage to SUSE is nevertheless enormously important to us and we try hard to return value to SUSE), the way of doing things has changed significantly. And one of the very most important of those changes has been to a more precise focus on who our target user is. This is reflected in the “Linux for Adults” which while not meaning that we do not welcome brand new Linux users coming especially from Windows (or other distros) - we do! - it does mean that our goal is not to deliver a simple drop-in replacement for the typical hands-off “just works” user, with the only major difference being that our software is free. For those users, we politely suggest SUSE’s commercial product or a distro like Ubuntu, which while free has a long-term commercial objective and substantial commercial funding from Canonical. Consequently, our project respectfully requests our users to contribute in some way and to whatever extent works for them in exchange for the efforts made by all the other volunteers. But we are a community project in the truest sense. Many of us have been with the project since it was SuSE (your use of that spelling did not escape my notice) and we are proud of its heritage, and we are delighted when new users choose the openSUSE project, but we know that its future depends entirely on what we as a community do.

The form that each member’s contribution takes is of course determined by each individual user for his/her self. I pointed you to the mailing lists because they are as I said one good start to get a sense of how the community works. But there are many other ways too, and I must confess that I am a rather poor source of information for most of those. Off the top of my head, there is also project management, project administration, marketing, documentation, wiki administration, user support, tips & tricks, development, testing & bug reporting, IRC channels (for really thick skin) upstream and cross-project linkages, user groups, ambassadors, translation, events, blogs, derivatives, and needless to add the tireless work that the moderators do here. There is much more.

How do you apply? AFAIK, you already have. I’m not aware of any formal process, and we certainly don’t ask for credentials at the door. lol! That “restrictive” line you found just means to communicate that, as I stated above, we ask that those wanting to join our community understand and be comfortable with the fact that we are all contributing volunteers. Again, the how and how much is up to each volunteer and his/her circumstance. So . . .

To proceed further, again I suggest the mailing lists if for no other purpose than to get a feel for the different moving parts of the project; before long you will begin to recognize certain names and roles. Take a look at the Newsletter and you will see it structured around many of the project’s human components. Click on Support at the top of this page and you will see the flat and broad structure of the project; explore the various portals and categories. We don’t have the spit-and-polish of a large top-down organization (we’re more like “herding cats”), but there is a great deal of substance there and perhaps something in particular that will interest you. Or just invest some time helping others here on the forums; that is enormously valuable and, because this is where new users typically come first, it is quite a challenge to provide all the support requested. Whatever, it’s up to you.

I can always be reached through the Private Messages section here, although I can’t always promise a quick reply. I am very time-constrained these days. But I’ve been happy to offer you an introduction to our community and hope I’ve provided enough to encourage you to look further into our project.

Best regards, and again, Welcome! :slight_smile:

To the moderators, You can lock this thread if you want to. My problem is, if not solved, so worked around through kind help from mingus725 and elksi! Thanks to you both!
The remaining must come through configuring of systemd, at least I hope. elksi showed me the nfs-client-problem, and thread, in my thread it was the cups services./Larsed

On 2011-11-27 20:46, mingus725 wrote:
> Supposedly, init can be called at boot rather than systemd by hitting
> the F5 key. I have not tested this myself. Of course, this assumes
> init has been installed, which it would not be on a fresh install.

It should work on a fresh install. It works on mine.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

On 2011-11-29 08:46, Larsed wrote:

> Concerning your PS: I did just want to put the lines I thought central
> to my question here (and not “contaminate” the site with endless
> scrolling through endless outputs ;)!). In other fora there sometimes is
> a possibility to add an attachment that the interested can read.

You can paste in the pastebin of the site (http://susepaste.org/)

> it would “feel” more constructive if I could find a way to “help” the
> radeon find the right monitor EDID, (path, or, make the monitor answer,
> or if the monitor is too old: make radeon stop searching, or
> anything…)

Notice that the numbers in brackets are seconds. The entire section takes 6
seconds. And it is not halting on the monitor problem, IMO.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

On 2011-11-30 13:36, Larsed wrote:

> and also a page on
> community membership. -I noticed the understandable, but restrictive
> lines > Warning! Please ensure to contribute first to the openSUSE Project then
>> > apply for membership… -If I decided to try apply, how do I do?

That’s for getting an opensuse.org mail address, and a few things more.
Those pages should explain it. To obtain it, basically you explain your
merits to them :slight_smile:


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

robin_listas, Thanks for your replies, came like scattered showers :wink:

the F5 key. I have not tested this myself. Of course, this assumes
init has been installed, which it would not be on a fresh install.
It should work on a fresh install. It works on mine.

So it did on mine! But I think there lies something in mingus’ note, it is possible that 12.2 or .3 doesn’t install init per default.

Notice that the numbers in brackets are seconds. The entire section takes 6
seconds. And it is not halting on the monitor problem, IMO.

Thank you for explaining the brackets to me! I’ve wondered through the years.
I knew it never halted on the monitor problem, but it is obviously a problem that systemd meets and I wanted to solve it!

You can paste in the pastebin of the site (SUSE Paste)

Thanks again! It wasn’t clear to me where, on earth, the paste went.

That’s for getting an opensuse.org mail address, and a few things more.
Those pages should explain it. To obtain it, basically you explain your
merits to them :slight_smile:

Thank you also for sorting this out to me! Had the pages been more enlightening I guess I never should have asked ;).