Making bootable USB ISO-file in Win 10

I have used “Rufus 2.11” and “Unetbootin-windows-625” to generate a bootable USB from downloaded “openSUSE-Leap-42.2-NET-x86_64” in my Windows 10 OS. Checksum in the downloaded file is OK.
Unerboot is not able to generate the USB and it looks like Rufus is not able to handle the openSUSE live media: " … Because the openSuse Live media detection process is incompatible with a FAT filesystem, it is not possible for Rufus to convert openSuse based live media to bootable USB using its regular method …".
This maybe the reason for installation (on external USB SSD-drive Samsung T3) errors (vc init error/iommuv2).
Any solution to this problem?

I don’t know about writing images with Rufus.

AFAIK the most recommended utility on Windows is Win32diskimager, but it hasn’t always worked for me.

In the end,
I’ve found the most reliable way for me is to build a distro (openSUSE) in a VM, then use that Guest to write to removable media (which can be anything… USB, SDcard, etc). I posted my procedure when using a VMware Guest which is easy enough to create using the free VMware Player, but the principles can be adapted for any virtualization technology. Although in my article I describe using xzcat, you can use whatever Linux app in your Linux guest, likely a DVD writing app if you’re writing an ISO image.

https://en.opensuse.org/User:Tsu2/Guest_write_to_device

TSU

Don’t use anything that modifies the ISO image most Linux USB boot helpers mod the iso

The best way from Windows is http://www.osforensics.com/tools/write-usb-images.html

Just yesterday I read an article about etcher, a java based tool that might do the trick. Etcher is available for windows, mac and various linux varieties.

https://etcher.io/

I always tend to recommend this:
http://www.osforensics.com/tools/write-usb-images.html

I have used it in the past, and other users have reported success too.
Not sure about Windows 10 though…

In the end it shouldn’t matter much which tool you use.
The important thing is that it doesn’t try to make the image bootable, but just copies it 1:1.
The openSUSE images are bootable already, modifying them will break them.

PS: Ok, gogalthorp has mentioned this already anyway, sorry. :wink:

When I last checked, Rufus had a “dd” option. That makes a direct raw copy of the iso to the device. That one should work.

As far as “incompatible with a FAT file system” – that’s because the iso is larger than the largest file that a FAT file system can accomodate.

As others have said, anything other than a raw copy to the device is unlikely to work.

Nothing to do with this then ?

https://en.opensuse.org/Create_installation_USB_stick#Universal_USB_Installer_.28Windows.29

Not sure what this question means, but looking at UUI description I would rather avoid it - it obviously modifies resulting image and does not simply create byte-copy. I wonder why it is listed. Anyone tried it?

[FONT=Verdana]Not sure what this question means, but looking at UUI description I would rather avoid it - it obviously modifies resulting image and does not simply create byte-copy. I wonder why it is listed. Anyone tried it?

[/FONT]
**[RIGHT][/RIGHT]
**

Not tried,
I guess it’s there for Windows users…
As I assume Windows doesn’t have the tools we have available?

Yes, obviously.

But the question was/is whether it actually works with the openSUSE ISOs, or if it breaks them.

As I read the paragraph, it does seem to have an explicit “openSUSE” option, so I would assume it “does the right thing” if you select that.
But I haven’t tried it either.

just use the new win10 linux subsystem with dd

Thanks. I finally used the Universal-USB-Installer 1.9.5.9 and it worked fine.

Oh , i can not doubt ,i used to installed a free version of Windows 10 via iso file on Microsoft website , i don’t remember its name ,
Under its guidance, users can run a usb/sd card that creates bootable media to choose , and the Windows can be booted with it , but now ,
But now that the program has been reported, the reason may be breaking the rules