looking for a linux book.

well my wife bought me what I thought was meant to be a linux reference book. Did I simply get the name wrong? In any case it is now to late.I had read references in linux magazines about what I understood to be this “linux bible”.Is this a naming issue,or is this just an 880 page introduction to linux That costs $89.95 ?

I can not justify spending this money on another book.Ican’t do any thing about this,so I guess I just needed to vent My disappointment.Thanks for punting up with my winge!

I’ll see if I can give you a heads up on something;)

IMHO the “for Dummies” series always is a good starter. The Dutch version of Linux for Dummies gives an introduction to linux, some basic command knowledge and in introduction to some of the desktops.

If you could be more specific about what you’re looking for, I might have some more suggestions from my shelf.

Please notice as well, that a lot of reference material is on your system as well.
For example: open a terminal window, do ‘man man’ and it will give info on accessing the manuals through the terminal using the command ‘man’.

i know it is a lot of money…but unless i miss my guess you are
gonna have a reference book that will be a great source of information
for ten or twenty years…maybe many more…

i have a huge and thick Linux Unleased - The Comprehensive Solution
Third Edition, first published in '98 and mine was printed in
2000…i’ve not read it all yet, and may never because i use it as a
desk reference to look up stuff, rather than just reading (though i
must hasten to add that i have read long sections on (for example)
basic commands, file system, permissions, bash, administration basics,
devices, processes, users, logins, backups, cron blah blah etc)…

the sticker on it says i paid $40…and, it has been WELL worth
that…however, today i would recommend you use the resources i
outline in an earlier post, here http://tinyurl.com/ybklh48


palladium

Unfortunately I already a for dummies edition.

Linux unleashed, I will look in to it thanks.

You know a printed version of the Open SUSE docs is not a silly idea if available,that does not seam to be an easy option.But Open SUSE’s docs beat the hell out of docs from other distros,I do read them.

[QUOTE=palladium;2106782]i know it is a lot of money…but unless i miss my guess you are
gonna have a reference book that will be a great source of information
for ten or twenty years…maybe many more…

i have a huge and thick Linux Unleased - The Comprehensive Solution
Third Edition, first published in '98 and mine was printed in
2000…i’ve not read it all yet, and may never because i use it as a
desk reference to look up stuff, rather than just reading (though i
must hasten to add that i have read long sections on (for example)
basic commands, file system, permissions, bash, administration basics,
devices, processes, users, logins, backups, cron blah blah etc)…

the sticker on it says i paid $40…and, it has been WELL worth
that…however, today i would recommend you use the resources i
outline in an earlier post, here Beginner resources - openSUSE Forums


palladium/QUOTE
A Reference book Is what I was prepared to spend this money on!

Some resources to check:

This list of books was pretty good: 12 Amazing and Essential Linux Books To Enrich Your Brain and Library

If I had to pick one in the list above, I’d probably go with “Essential System Administration”.

I recommend “The Linux Command Line,” which was written by William Shotts, Jr. The book, published under the Creative Commons “No Derivative Works” License is freely available (check Linuxcommand.org). There is a downloadable .pdf somehwere. The 500 page tome has helped me to understand how the Linux command line works, and has been an invaluable resource overall in furthering my understanding of the OS.

I’m not sure what you’re looking for in a book, but this one (which is free) has been very helpful and “fun” to work through.

I know these aren’t books, but when I install a package or need help I always used “man -k subject” and replace subject with the command, config file, or package name. The other thing I do is I search the repositories for “doc”, “help”, or “book” packages. Once installed most of them are stored under “/usr/share/doc/packages/” for openSuSE. A lot of packages come with html or pdf documentation.

This is a little harsh!
After spending some time with this book there is a lot of useful info in here,about half of this book concentrates on choosing a distro,Installing that distro and using apps,that come with the distros,there are 18 distros supplied on the disks,these are all covered for install an usage.
Where this would be useful for a new linux user,It is an area where those who have played with linux for a while will not gain alot.
The other half of the book is where most of the value lies for current linux users.
The person who gets the most value from this book is the windows user who is determined to make linux work for them.

I nearly forgot one of the main reasons for me posting again on this thread,
Thanks to all for the great suggestions!!

Remember to view in something more eye friendly, use konqueror, Eg:

man:zypper

You are right,a lot easier on the eye!! thanks.

maybe it changes in some versions of Konqueror, but here i use

#zypper

in konqueror’s “Location:” block…and up pops the ‘man’…

three key strokes here, another three there and suddenly you have
enough spare time on your hands to have an ice cream, and scream!


palladium

Yes,

#zypper

also works for me! nice!