Install of second tumbleweed install results in no new GRUB entry

So, I initially blindly installed tumbleweed a couple weeks ago on a small partition to try out, which strangely the installer didn’t offer the larger empty partition(iirc it was the offline image which I used to create an install USB disk). Ran that for a while and it was fine dual booting windows and opensuse tumbleweed.

7900X/X670e ASROCK PG Lightning/a770 LE/64GB

Primary boot drive is a 1TB nvme, windows 11 pro, if that matters.

This evening I decided that the original install was a little tight on disk space, and so downloaded the tumbleweed net install, created USB boot drive from ISO.

Proceeded to eventually get it to see the empty 2TB spinning rust partition and install.

Reboot. … and … I get GRUB(I guess new to opensuse) which offers tumbleweed(original install on small partition), adv. options, and primary windows 11

hmmmm… boot the tumbleweed and yes it’s the old small partition install

reboot, look in grub advanced options, not applicable, choose boot to UEFI, and then manually boot the larger partition option from there!

Why does YAST NOT update properly for new installs?! Why does it only offer the original install?

Is there a simple way to rebuild GRUB to see ALL installs once booted from either install?

(Less importantly is there a clean way to remove original throwaway install beyond deleting the partitions ina partition manager once GRUB is cleaned up?)

EDIT: Not a priority but really Im looking for guidance on perhaps rebuilding GRUB boot menu to show windows and BOTH tumbleweed installs. Ill continue looking around but probably will not have time until next week, so in essence Im hoping for a short circuit answer and maybe some background as to why opensuse tumbleweed behaves this way as IME other distros tend to detect multiple installs, even if they’re not the same ‘flavor’…

Thanks

mount
/dev/nvme0n1p7 on / type btrfs (rw,relatime,ssd,discard=async,space_cache=v2,subvolid=266,subvol=/@/.snapshots/1/snapshot)
devtmpfs on /dev type devtmpfs (rw,nosuid,size=4096k,nr_inodes=8186340,mode=755,inode64)
tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,inode64)
devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,nosuid,noexec,relatime,gid=5,mode=620,ptmxmode=000)
sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
securityfs on /sys/kernel/security type securityfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
cgroup2 on /sys/fs/cgroup type cgroup2 (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,nsdelegate,memory_recursiveprot)
pstore on /sys/fs/pstore type pstore (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
efivarfs on /sys/firmware/efi/efivars type efivarfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
bpf on /sys/fs/bpf type bpf (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,mode=700)
proc on /proc type proc (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
tmpfs on /run type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,size=13105876k,nr_inodes=819200,mode=755,inode64)
systemd-1 on /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc type autofs (rw,relatime,fd=32,pgrp=1,timeout=0,minproto=5,maxproto=5,direct,pipe_ino=20945)
hugetlbfs on /dev/hugepages type hugetlbfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,pagesize=2M)
mqueue on /dev/mqueue type mqueue (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
debugfs on /sys/kernel/debug type debugfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
tracefs on /sys/kernel/tracing type tracefs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
fusectl on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
configfs on /sys/kernel/config type configfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
/dev/nvme0n1p7 on /.snapshots type btrfs (rw,relatime,ssd,discard=async,space_cache=v2,subvolid=265,subvol=/@/.snapshots)
/dev/nvme0n1p7 on /root type btrfs (rw,relatime,ssd,discard=async,space_cache=v2,subvolid=260,subvol=/@/root)
/dev/nvme0n1p7 on /boot/grub2/x86_64-efi type btrfs (rw,relatime,ssd,discard=async,space_cache=v2,subvolid=263,subvol=/@/boot/grub2/x86_64-efi)
/dev/nvme0n1p7 on /boot/grub2/i386-pc type btrfs (rw,relatime,ssd,discard=async,space_cache=v2,subvolid=264,subvol=/@/boot/grub2/i386-pc)
/dev/nvme0n1p7 on /home type btrfs (rw,relatime,ssd,discard=async,space_cache=v2,subvolid=262,subvol=/@/home)
/dev/nvme0n1p7 on /opt type btrfs (rw,relatime,ssd,discard=async,space_cache=v2,subvolid=261,subvol=/@/opt)
/dev/nvme0n1p7 on /srv type btrfs (rw,relatime,ssd,discard=async,space_cache=v2,subvolid=259,subvol=/@/srv)
/dev/nvme0n1p7 on /usr/local type btrfs (rw,relatime,ssd,discard=async,space_cache=v2,subvolid=258,subvol=/@/usr/local)
/dev/nvme0n1p7 on /var type btrfs (rw,relatime,ssd,discard=async,space_cache=v2,subvolid=257,subvol=/@/var)
/dev/nvme0n1p2 on /boot/efi type vfat (rw,relatime,fmask=0022,dmask=0022,codepage=437,iocharset=iso8859-1,shortname=mixed,utf8,errors=remount-ro)
tmpfs on /tmp type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,nr_inodes=1048576,inode64)
tracefs on /sys/kernel/debug/tracing type tracefs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
tmpfs on /run/user/1000 type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,size=6552936k,nr_inodes=1638234,mode=700,uid=1000,gid=1000,inode64)
portal on /run/user/1000/doc type fuse.portal (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=1000,group_id=1000)
gvfsd-fuse on /run/user/1000/gvfs type fuse.gvfsd-fuse (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=1000,group_id=1000)
inxi -GSaxz
System:
  Kernel: 6.5.4-1-default arch: x86_64 bits: 64 compiler: gcc v: 13.2.1
    parameters: BOOT_IMAGE=/boot/vmlinuz-6.5.4-1-default
    root=UUID=d87e26a1-265c-410a-8e3f-fd8a4ce3d4c1 splash=silent
    mitigations=auto quiet security=apparmor
  Desktop: KDE Plasma v: 5.27.8 tk: Qt v: 5.15.10 wm: kwin_wayland vt: 3
    dm: SDDM Distro: openSUSE Tumbleweed 20231006
Graphics:
  Device-1: Intel DG2 [Arc A770] driver: i915 v: kernel arch: Gen-12.7
    code: Alchemist process: TSMC n6 (7nm) built: 2022+ pcie: gen: 1
    speed: 2.5 GT/s lanes: 1 ports: active: DP-3,DP-4 empty: DP-1, DP-2,
    HDMI-A-1, HDMI-A-2, HDMI-A-3 bus-ID: 03:00.0 chip-ID: 8086:56a0
    class-ID: 0300
  Display: wayland server: X.org v: 1.21.1.8 with: Xwayland v: 23.2.1
    compositor: kwin_wayland driver: X: loaded: modesetting unloaded: fbdev,vesa
    alternate: intel dri: iris gpu: i915 d-rect: 3128x1920 display-ID: 0
  Monitor-1: DP-3 pos: primary,left res: 2048x1152 size: N/A modes: N/A
  Monitor-2: DP-4 pos: right res: 1080x1920 size: N/A modes: N/A
  API: OpenGL v: 4.6 Mesa 23.2.1 renderer: Mesa Intel Arc A770 Graphics
    (DG2) direct-render: Yes

It occurs to me that I may have whoopsed, rebooting to check on windows as that drive should not be the one that I installed to. Should be sdd IIRC

Show full output of

efibootmgr -v

By default all grubs go to directory /boot/efi/EFI/opensuse. You may want to specify another folder:

erlangen:~ # grep GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR /etc/default/grub
GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=Tumbleweed
erlangen:~ # 

Specifying GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=Tumbleweed results in:

erlangen:~ # find /boot/efi/EFI/ -type f
/boot/efi/EFI/tumbleweed/grubx64.efi
/boot/efi/EFI/BOOT/BOOTX64.EFI
erlangen:~ # 

As Karl touched on, GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR= in /etc/default/grub is responsible for the name UEFI uses for booting. AFAICT, this applies to all distributions that use Grub bootloader for UEFI booting. In openSUSE, the name is absent from /etc/default/grub, so the default “opensuse” is supplied from elsewhere, and applied to /boot/efi/EFI/ to provide the home for the actual boot file(s) grubx64.efi, BOOTX64.EFI and possibly others. The same problem occurs for those using both TW and Leap. All that’s necessary to prevent multiple installations using the same name is to edit /etc/default/grub and make GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR= a unique value, such as Karl did, before making a second installation of the same distribution and/or version. Here there are no TWs duplicated, so I use opensusetw, opensuse155, opensuse156, debian13, debian12, mageia9, mageia8, etc as the installation names, which become the directory names in /etc/efi/EFI/, and you see used by UEFI firmware in setup and BBS menus.

As it turns out, only one Linux bootloader per PC is needed. Grub’s os-prober can find all installed kernels and initrds so that every installed distro is represented in one Grub menu. It doesn’t happen before the fact, so taking this route requires ensuring grub.cfg is regenerated using os-prober after every new installation is completed, and after each additional distro has a kernel version change, before the change appears in the menu. There are ways to make this requirement pointless. My method is the use of symlinks for booting all kernels and initrds in building a custom.cfg file to supplement grub.cfg via the files in /etc/grub.d/. As long as all the kernels/initrds you wish to boot this way point to names of symlinks, no maintenance of custom.cfg is required unless and until distro installations are added, moved, or removed.

1 Like

yes, which is why I am querying there should ONLY BE ONE bootloader partition and it SHOULD be ABLE to list all SUPPORTED OS boot option, but opensuse seems to sprinkle them all over the fscking place! It’s infuriating!

I’m NOT meaning to be trollish but this is NOT something that I should be dealing with. Sprinkling boot partitions all over the place when you can use a single one, Hell even my first install on the smaller partition is using something separate ffs! This is NOT even close to ideal for a multiboot system FFS!

Believe me I AM restraining myself somewhat… BTW GNOME is TOTAL ASS I have project aeon on my i5-8365u notebook and GNOME is so obtuse that yeah the underlying layer MAY be great I have zero interest in it.

All of this said tumbleweed with the testing is probably the best rolling distro but these yes lets create EFI boot partitions each time rather than modifying the existing partition, just no unless specified to do so.

So final questuin is there a way to rebuild GRUB on a SINGLE EFI partition to support windows, the small partition tumbleweed and this larger tumbleweed partition? I suspect that the answer is yes but I’ll need to do it myself and hope that going forward that tumbleweed doesn’t do anything else stupidly and/or respects configurations.

Christ GNOME is absolute ass, sorry can’t hold back on that as back in the day I loved GNOME v. KDE as the ‘big’ DEs but man GNOME devs, get a grip, burying crap layers deep that should be front and center… I digress forgive me… I was messing with aeon on that i5 8365u notebook and all I felt on boot was irritation at it’s uselessness… TBD elsewhere I guess…

I was an idiot here it is

sudo efibootmgr -v
[sudo] password for root: 
BootCurrent: 0001
Timeout: 5 seconds
BootOrder: 0009,0001,0000,0008,0003,0005,0007
Boot0000* Windows Boot Manager  HD(2,GPT,c62b56aa-60e8-4f8e-8fcd-38713c68ab19,0xe1800,0x32000)/File(\EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi)57494e444f5753000100000088000000780000004200430044004f0042004a004500430054003d007b00390064006500610038003600320063002d0035006300640064002d0034006500370030002d0061006300630031002d006600330032006200330034003400640034003700390035007d00000032000100000010000000040000007fff0400
      dp: 04 01 2a 00 02 00 00 00 00 18 0e 00 00 00 00 00 00 20 03 00 00 00 00 00 aa 56 2b c6 e8 60 8e 4f 8f cd 38 71 3c 68 ab 19 02 02 / 04 04 46 00 5c 00 45 00 46 00 49 00 5c 00 4d 00 69 00 63 00 72 00 6f 00 73 00 6f 00 66 00 74 00 5c 00 42 00 6f 00 6f 00 74 00 5c 00 62 00 6f 00 6f 00 74 00 6d 00 67 00 66 00 77 00 2e 00 65 00 66 00 69 00 00 00 / 7f ff 04 00
    data: 57 49 4e 44 4f 57 53 00 01 00 00 00 88 00 00 00 78 00 00 00 42 00 43 00 44 00 4f 00 42 00 4a 00 45 00 43 00 54 00 3d 00 7b 00 39 00 64 00 65 00 61 00 38 00 36 00 32 00 63 00 2d 00 35 00 63 00 64 00 64 00 2d 00 34 00 65 00 37 00 30 00 2d 00 61 00 63 00 63 00 31 00 2d 00 66 00 33 00 32 00 62 00 33 00 34 00 34 00 64 00 34 00 37 00 39 00 35 00 7d 00 00 00 32 00 01 00 00 00 10 00 00 00 04 00 00 00 7f ff 04 00
Boot0001* opensuse-secureboot   HD(2,GPT,c62b56aa-60e8-4f8e-8fcd-38713c68ab19,0xe1800,0x32000)/File(\EFI\opensuse\shim.efi)
      dp: 04 01 2a 00 02 00 00 00 00 18 0e 00 00 00 00 00 00 20 03 00 00 00 00 00 aa 56 2b c6 e8 60 8e 4f 8f cd 38 71 3c 68 ab 19 02 02 / 04 04 32 00 5c 00 45 00 46 00 49 00 5c 00 6f 00 70 00 65 00 6e 00 73 00 75 00 73 00 65 00 5c 00 73 00 68 00 69 00 6d 00 2e 00 65 00 66 00 69 00 00 00 / 7f ff 04 00
Boot0003  Windows Boot Manager  HD(3,GPT,0e91148d-b40e-46b6-9f5a-9bd220e89fec,0x1f7a3000,0x32000)/File(\EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi)0000424f
      dp: 04 01 2a 00 03 00 00 00 00 30 7a 1f 00 00 00 00 00 20 03 00 00 00 00 00 8d 14 91 0e 0e b4 b6 46 9f 5a 9b d2 20 e8 9f ec 02 02 / 04 04 46 00 5c 00 45 00 46 00 49 00 5c 00 4d 00 69 00 63 00 72 00 6f 00 73 00 6f 00 66 00 74 00 5c 00 42 00 6f 00 6f 00 74 00 5c 00 62 00 6f 00 6f 00 74 00 6d 00 67 00 66 00 77 00 2e 00 65 00 66 00 69 00 00 00 / 7f ff 04 00
    data: 00 00 42 4f
Boot0005  ubuntu        HD(2,GPT,e5a9e176-5629-4f38-9d2c-de62a4c9f80f,0xe1800,0x32000)/File(\EFI\ubuntu\shimx64.efi) File(.)
      dp: 04 01 2a 00 02 00 00 00 00 18 0e 00 00 00 00 00 00 20 03 00 00 00 00 00 76 e1 a9 e5 29 56 38 4f 9d 2c de 62 a4 c9 f8 0f 02 02 / 04 04 34 00 5c 00 45 00 46 00 49 00 5c 00 75 00 62 00 75 00 6e 00 74 00 75 00 5c 00 73 00 68 00 69 00 6d 00 78 00 36 00 34 00 2e 00 65 00 66 00 69 00 00 00 / 7f ff 04 00
    data: 00 00 42 4f
Boot0007  ubuntu        HD(2,GPT,c62b56aa-60e8-4f8e-8fcd-38713c68ab19,0xe1800,0x32000)/File(\EFI\ubuntu\shimx64.efi) File(.)
      dp: 04 01 2a 00 02 00 00 00 00 18 0e 00 00 00 00 00 00 20 03 00 00 00 00 00 aa 56 2b c6 e8 60 8e 4f 8f cd 38 71 3c 68 ab 19 02 02 / 04 04 34 00 5c 00 45 00 46 00 49 00 5c 00 75 00 62 00 75 00 6e 00 74 00 75 00 5c 00 73 00 68 00 69 00 6d 00 78 00 36 00 34 00 2e 00 65 00 66 00 69 00 00 00 / 7f ff 04 00
    data: 00 00 42 4f
Boot0008* Windows Boot Manager  HD(2,GPT,e5a9e176-5629-4f38-9d2c-de62a4c9f80f,0xe1800,0x32000)/File(\EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi)0000424f
      dp: 04 01 2a 00 02 00 00 00 00 18 0e 00 00 00 00 00 00 20 03 00 00 00 00 00 76 e1 a9 e5 29 56 38 4f 9d 2c de 62 a4 c9 f8 0f 02 02 / 04 04 46 00 5c 00 45 00 46 00 49 00 5c 00 4d 00 69 00 63 00 72 00 6f 00 73 00 6f 00 66 00 74 00 5c 00 42 00 6f 00 6f 00 74 00 5c 00 62 00 6f 00 6f 00 74 00 6d 00 67 00 66 00 77 00 2e 00 65 00 66 00 69 00 00 00 / 7f ff 04 00
    data: 00 00 42 4f
Boot0009* opensuse-secureboot   HD(3,GPT,0e91148d-b40e-46b6-9f5a-9bd220e89fec,0x1f7a3000,0x32000)/File(\EFI\opensuse\shim.efi) File(.)
      dp: 04 01 2a 00 03 00 00 00 00 30 7a 1f 00 00 00 00 00 20 03 00 00 00 00 00 8d 14 91 0e 0e b4 b6 46 9f 5a 9b d2 20 e8 9f ec 02 02 / 04 04 32 00 5c 00 45 00 46 00 49 00 5c 00 6f 00 70 00 65 00 6e 00 73 00 75 00 73 00 65 00 5c 00 73 00 68 00 69 00 6d 00 2e 00 65 00 66 00 69 00 00 00 / 7f ff 04 00
    data: 00 00 42 4f

not sure why the ubuntu listings are there as they’re LONG gone from before I upgraded to AM5/zen4

I’ll check partitions again but there’s nothing there and if there are efi parts I’ll be mostly loathe to destroy them.

Last distro was ARCH but it was always broken since either packages broke each other or I waited too long to update, which tumbleweed seems to ‘mostly’ alleviate for a rolling distro as I NEED to dual boot and frankly linux is still secondary to windows even though I really do not like windows any more than linux, and especially since I have Intel AXE210 wifi card and Intel ARC a770 which BOTH had and have problems with windows(mostly 10)

this is a ‘long’ lived multiboot system.

last update was mobo transplant which I did NOT expect to work well BUT miraculously windows has progressed and maybe since I went AMD->AMD it worked out better than I expected. (expected hard fail)

Even swapping out nvidia card for intel worked fine until bug investigation w/intel resulkted in ddu to no real use… windows apparently no longer does stupid things, like trying to run drivers for non-existent hw, or relying on booting drives in a simplistically stupid fashion…

Im still irritated w/the reduction in PCIe lanes(and waste of two on my board ffs!) uselessly large number of USB ports, and stupidly large number of nvme slots!(I use one) and maxed out all four SATA, but have this adapter to try for nvme to 5 sata ports hanging around…

Also now that I look at the output one of the windows efi boot is my old windows 10 SSD boot drive that I used BEFORE migrating to a 1TB nvme and updating to windows 11, as that also presented problems, so Im keeping it around as a failsafe since yeah even windows does not get stuff right and in a horrible failure I can at leat re-image from that drive although I should re-image windows 11 to it, but yeah differing drive sizes (512GB v. 1TB of course they’re neither that size more like 480GB and 920 or so GB)

Multiboot isn’t easy. It’s as much art as science. Distro installation programs aren’t intended to deal with it more than cursorily. For us to help meaningfully you must provide a lot more information. Efibootmgr was a start, mount not so much, full of noise[1]. To go with that is needed an inventory of installed operating systems and where they are installed - in detail. Fstab content, tree output from all ESP partitions, lsblk -f input/output, annotated output from fdisk or parted, all so we know what lives where and is identifiable. All in PRE-formatted text as presented in your terminal, no screenshots. Before you do, it would help for you to use efibootmgr and your favorite superuser file manager to remove from NVRAM and EFI directories each OS entry applicable to an absent distro.

[1] I find the following cuts mount output down nicely for my own needs:

alias Mnt='mount | egrep -v "cgroup|rpc|ramfs|tmpfs|^sys|on /dev|on /proc|on /sys|on /var" | sort '

BTRFS users may want to adjust it.

Seeing as you’re new here, it might pay to say here that I have been multibooting around 3 decades and have upwards of 40 working multiboot PCs, averaging well in excess of 12 installed operating systems each. On those using UEFI, all are normally booting everything from TW’s Grub’s presenting /boot/grub2/custom.cfg entries before any that grub2-mkconfig creates. Custom.cfg includes only symlinks that contain no dots or numerals for specifying all relevant kernels and initrds. The older PCs with only BIOS booting ordinarily boot from openSUSE Grub Legacy, mostly from 13.1, which provided the most pleasant of bootloader environments as customized, using a menu.lst self-maintained also with no dots or numerals.

1 Like

You have two boot entries for openSUSE. Show output of

lsblk -f
blkid

Multiboot can be easy. However users frequently go with not so robust solutions. Host 6700k, a sibling of infamous host erlangen has 9 Linux systems installed on 8 system partitions on /dev/sda. Leap 15.4 and Leap 15.5 share a single btrfs partition. /dev/sdb holds another Tumbleweed install. Each of the drives has another Windows install:

6700k:~ # fdisk -l
Disk /dev/sda: 465.76 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: Samsung SSD 850 
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 90C1973B-4A41-4E96-85BA-B7358EA77CCC

Device         Start       End   Sectors  Size Type
/dev/sda1       2048    208895    206848  101M EFI System
/dev/sda2     208896  63119359  62910464   30G Linux filesystem
/dev/sda3   63119360 126033919  62914560   30G Linux filesystem
/dev/sda4  126033920 348360703 222326784  106G Linux filesystem
/dev/sda5  348360704 450760703 102400000 48.8G Linux filesystem
/dev/sda6  450760704 450793471     32768   16M Microsoft reserved
/dev/sda7  450793472 513105919  62312448 29.7G Linux filesystem
/dev/sda8  513105920 638033919 124928000 59.6G Linux filesystem
/dev/sda9  638033920 700948479  62914560   30G Linux filesystem
/dev/sda11 734502912 852498431 117995520 56.3G Linux filesystem
/dev/sda12 852498432 975696763 123198332 58.7G Microsoft basic data
/dev/sda13 975697920 976771071   1073152  524M Windows recovery environment


Disk /dev/sdb: 931.51 GiB, 1000204886016 bytes, 1953525168 sectors
Disk model: Samsung SSD 870 
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 7D9FA4BA-4FAA-4A55-A7A8-96335ADF158B

Device          Start        End    Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sdb1        2048     206847     204800   100M EFI System
/dev/sdb2      206848     239615      32768    16M Microsoft reserved
/dev/sdb3      239616 1747603256 1747363641 833.2G Microsoft basic data
/dev/sdb4  1952403456 1953521663    1118208   546M Windows recovery environment
/dev/sdb5  1747603456 1952403455  204800000  97.7G Linux filesystem

Partition table entries are not in disk order.
6700k:~ # 

No adverse interaction exists between the system partitions. Unique values of GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR warrants hassle free sharing of the two EFI System partitions.

With enough experience, it definitely can be, but you can’t be a fraidy cat. Some things just don’t get learned without making mistakes.

DFSee Linux  17.0 : executing: fdisk -r- -w-
Command timestamp : Sunday 2023-09-26 18:12:27
+---+--+--+-----------------+--------+--------+-----------+----------------------------------------+-----------+
|ID |ux|Dr|Type, description|Format  |Related |VolumeLabel|OS2-LVM/BM / GPT / Crypt / additional in|  Size MiB |
+--[/dev/sda     GPT disk  1]--------+--------+-----------[Model=SATA SSD, FwRe]-------------------+-----------+
|01 |  |  |Fsp + GPT hdr/pta|-- -- --|-- -- --|- - - - - -|                                        |        1.0|
|01 | 1|  |EFI System  (ESP)|FAT32   |mkfs.fat|SP25P01ESP |sp25 p01 EFI System (ESP)               |      320.0|
|02 | 2|  |Linux Swap       |SWAP    |LinuxV1 |SWAPSPACE2 |sp25 p02 Linux Swap                     |     1619.0|
|03 | 3|  |Linux Data       |EXT2    |Linux   |sp25p03res |sp25 p03 Linux reservation              |      400.0|
|04 | 4|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p04ulcl|sp25 p04 Linux /usr/local               |     4000.0|
|05 | 5|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p05home|sp25 p05 Linux /home                    |     6400.0|
|06 | 6|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p06pub |sp25 p06 Linux /pub                     |    15200.0|
|07 | 7|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p07stw |sp25 p07 openSUSE Tumbleweed            |     8000.0|
|08 | 8|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p08s153|sp25 p08 openSUSE 15.3                  |     8000.0|
|09 | 9|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p09s151|sp25 p09 openSUSE 15.1                  |     8000.0|
|10 |10|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p10deb1|sp25 p10 Debian 11 Bullseye             |     8000.0|
|11 |11|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p11s152|sp25 p11 openSUSE 15.2                  |     8000.0|
|12 |12|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p12ub20|sp25 p12 Tubuntu 2004 Focal             |     8000.0|
|13 |13|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p13deb1|sp25 p13 Debian 13 Trixie               |     8000.0|
|14 |14|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p14ub22|sp25 p14 Tubuntu 2204 Jammy             |     8000.0|
|15 |15|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p15s155|sp25 p15 openSUSE 15.5                  |     8000.0|
|16 |16|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p16s156|sp25 p16 openSUSE 15.6                  |     8000.0|
|17 |17|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p17s154|sp25 p17 openSUSE 15.4                  |     8000.0|
|18 |18|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p18deb1|sp25 p18 Debian 12 Bookworm             |     8000.0|
|19 |19|  |Linux Data       |EXT4    |Linux   |sp25p19sslo|sp25 p19 openSUSE Slowroll              |     8000.0|
|20 |20|  |Linux Data       |unknown |Linux   |           |New: Linux Data                         |     8000.0|
|21 |  |  |FreeSpace GPT    |-- -- --|-- -- --|- - - - - -|                                        |    92000.0|
|21 |21|  |Linux Data       |unknown |Linux   |           |New: Linux Data                         |    12258.0|
|54 |  |  |Fsp + GPT pta/hdr|-- -- --|-- -- --|- - - - - -|                                        |      0.320|
+--[/dev/sdb     MBR disk  2]--------+--------+-----------[20131001 ST1000DM]----------------------+-----------+
|22 |  |  |FreeSpace Wasted |-- -- --|-- -- --|- - - - - -|                                        |        1.0|
|22*| 1|  |Prim 06 FAT16    |FAT16   |IBM  7.0|1R1DOSBOOT |1R1 P01 DOS C:       DOS C: P01 1R1     |      252.0|
|23*| 2|  |Hide 17 Inst-FSys|HPFS    |IBM 4.50|1TT-P02    |1R1 P02 eCS          eCS P02 1R1        |     2400.0|
|24>| 3|  |Prim 83 LinuxNatv|EXT2    |GRUB    |realboot1r1|1R1 P03 realboot     realboot P03 1R1   |      400.0|
|25 | 5|  |Log  01 FAT12    |FAT     |IBM 4.50|1R1-DUMMY  |1R1 P05 DOS D:ummy   DOS D:ummy P05 1R1 |        1.0|
|26 | 6|  |Log  06 FAT16    |FAT     |IBM 4.50|1R1DOSDATA |1R1 P06 DOS E:       DOS E: P06 1R1     |      252.0|
|27 | 7|  |Log  82 SunS/SWAP|SWAP    |LinuxV1 |SWAPSPACE2 |1R1 P07 linux swap   linux swap P07 1R1 |     8200.0|
|28 | 8|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md08tmp   |1R1 P08 linux /tmp   linux /tmp P08 1R1 |     9363.0|
|29*| 9|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md09root1 |1R1 P09 suse131      suse131 P09 1R1    |    18000.0|
|30*|10|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md10root2 |1R1 P10 suse151      suse151 P10 1R1    |    18000.0|
|31*|11|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md11root3 |1R1 P11 susetw       susetw  P11 1R1    |    18000.0|
|32*|12|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |GRUB    |1md12root4 |1R1 P12 suse152      suse152 P12 1R1    |    18000.0|
|33 |13|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md13srv   |1R1 P13 linux /srv   linux /srv P13 1R1 |     4000.0|
|34 |14|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md14usrl  |1R1 P14 /usr/local   /usr/local P14 1R1 |     2000.0|
|35 |15|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md15home  |1R1 P15 /home        /home P15 1R1      |   150000.0|
|36 |16|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md16pub   |1R1 P16 /pub         /pub P16 1R1       |   235000.0|
|37 |17|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md17isos  |1R1 P17 /isos        /isos P17 1R1      |   470000.0|
|55 |  |  |Partial Cylinder |-- -- --|-- -- --|- - - - - -|                                        |      0.711|
+--[/dev/sdc     MBR disk  3]--------+--------+-----------[20140607 ST1000DM]----------------------+-----------+
|38 |  |  |FreeSpace Wasted |-- -- --|-- -- --|- - - - - -|                                        |        1.0|
|38*| 1|  |Prim 06 FAT16    |FAT16   |IBM  7.0|1R2DOSBOOT |1R2 P01 DOS C:       DOS C: P01 1R2     |      252.0|
|39*| 2|  |Hide 17 Inst-FSys|HPFS    |IBM 4.50|1TT-P02    |1R2 P02 eCS          eCS P02 1R2        |     2400.0|
|40>| 3|  |Prim 83 LinuxNatv|EXT2    |GRUB    |realboot1r2|1R2 P03 realboot     realboot P03 1R2   |      400.0|
|41 | 5|  |Log  01 FAT12    |FAT     |IBM 4.50|1R2-DUMMY  |1R2 P05 DOS D:ummy   DOS D:ummy P05 1R2 |        1.0|
|42 | 6|  |Log  06 FAT16    |FAT     |IBM 4.50|1R2DOSDATA |1R2 P06 DOS E:       DOS E: P06 1R2     |      252.0|
|43 | 7|  |Log  82 SunS/SWAP|SWAP    |LinuxV1 |SWAPSPACE2 |1R2 P07 linux swap   linux swap P07 1R2 |     8200.0|
|44 | 8|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md08tmp   |1R2 P08 linux /tmp   linux /tmp P08 1R2 |     9363.0|
|45*| 9|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md09root1 |1R2 P09 suse131      suse131 P09 1R2    |    18000.0|
|46*|10|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md10root2 |1R2 P10 suse151      suse151 P10 1R2    |    18000.0|
|47*|11|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md11root3 |1R2 P11 susetw       susetw  P11 1R2    |    18000.0|
|48*|12|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |GRUB    |1md12root4 |1R2 P12 suse152      suse152 P12 1R2    |    18000.0|
|49 |13|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md13srv   |1R2 P13 linux /srv   linux /srv P13 1R2 |     4000.0|
|50 |14|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md14usrl  |1R2 P14 /usr/local   /usr/local P14 1R2 |     2000.0|
|51 |15|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md15home  |1R2 P15 /home        /home P15 1R2      |   150000.0|
|52 |16|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md16pub   |1R2 P16 /pub         /pub P16 1R2       |   235000.0|
|53 |17|  |Log  fd LinuxRaid|EXT4    |Linux   |1md17isos  |1R2 P17 /isos        /isos P17 1R2      |   470000.0|
|56 |  |  |Partial Cylinder |-- -- --|-- -- --|- - - - - -|                                        |      0.711|

Here shown is one system that has 13 Linux installations on SSD, and 4 installed to HDD RAID, in a mixture of UEFI booting and BIOS booting that many would have you believe can’t work.

This holds for single boot too. :wink:

Many years ago, I had a machine configured similarly - was interesting and involved. I’d be leary of having ‘13’ of anything :slight_smile:

sorry for the long delay but it may also appear that I am having UEFI on my ASROCK OG lightning x670e as I was able to get a higher resolution boot screen the other day with all of the entries that I expected and then it appeared that the boot order reverted from what I assigned in ‘BIOS’(since its not ‘BIOS’ any longer but Ill call it that anyways).

Additionally I’m going to wipe all these old partitions and give it a go again from scratch especially since the last snapshot wants to revert glib libs, and NO i did NOT check since Im YOLO going to re-install anyways, lets see what happens.

As to project aeon/GNOME yeah, when I feel like messing w/GNOME/better mood I’ll give it a go on the notebook again… it’s hibernating for now, but GNOME and the way that they INSIST on doing things and continuously breaking things annoys me. That was fine WAY WAY WAY back in the day, but today, no thats just wrong!

So basically I REALLY need to do some housekeeping and plan to order another nvme drive(theyre surprisingly cheap now esp. considering the paltry 4 SATA ports my board has meanwhile it has 100(k I exaggerate slightly) nvme slots, along w/a 1000 useless USB slots(exaggeration again but you get the picture modern mobos useless design decisions, oh and the lightning oh hey lets NOT use those two other PCIe lanes…)

Sorry, I’m irritated for starting an essentially useless thread which was operator error…

Hoping that ASROCK finally update BIOS w/something NOT ‘beta’ only on this one for the VSOC voltage limitation(IIRC to 1.35V) 1.07 initially shipped was working great for me, so I went into inertia mode…

EDIT:
This was an update boot drive originally 512GB SATA win10pro which live in an asrock fatal1ty x370 board w/2700X, originally though about 5900X but microcent had a really good price on 7900X/32GB DDR5 6000 so I bought those, bought the lightning(cheapest x670e which cost me what I paid for the fatal1ty(taichi + 5GBps ether x370). Swap for windows etc. worked no problems. (probably becuase very similar x86 arch/firmware).

Eventually got a 1TB good perf nvme for $20, imaged 512GB SATA to nvme, works perfectly. Swapped eVGA 1070FTW for arc a770 LE 16GB works fine etc.

Windows has also come a long ways, I generally don’t buy DDU for windows unless drivers do stupid things and leave cruft all over the place.

Updated that wo w11pro, well twice first time was nagging M$ account login, mustve skipped something, reimaged, updated bingo w11pro(UI is eh mostly they moved things around in taskbar and unblocked some things like 6e WIFI which worked under w10pro w/a beta WHQL driver although flakily and some a770 stuff was solved by going w11pro, yes I need windows applications on REAL windows plus yeah zen4/DG2 drivers still new for linux)

Anyways, I’ll sort my messy setup out although I plan to keep things as much in place as possible especially avoiding any windows re-install from scratch(and yes to re-iterate I need real windows os)

End of day I guess I’m still a bit on the bleeding edge although zen4 and DG2 are both about a year plus old now… but especially for linux I want a closish to bleeding edge distro which tumbleweed gives me especially since both CPU and my GPU benefit still from almost every kernel/mesa update.

KDE/Waylan is really nice for me on the 7900X/a770… no crashes yet played one game from steam to test proton which worked OK… (also have a steam deck which unfortunately has sat mostly untouched since summer, now that its fall and cooler again I suspect that it will suck time from things like screwing up distro installations and repairs or more correct installations…)

Thanks again for insight and help

This was supposed to be an EDIT but the delay is so short yeah… sorry for the wall of text

EDIT:
glib downgrades haven’t apparently broken anything but yes I will buy another nvme and image the current boot drive to it and store it as a master backup and my old 512GB SATA drive is currently my master backup(still on w10pro… :D) and then I will start cleaning up partitions although I know FULL WELL that the backup boot drive will not save my various drive if I whoops… too many projects as I also need to migrate asustor NAS drives to another old original 1800X based server which I now wonder should I use the fatal1ty/2700X or buy a newer AM4 CPU for it, maybe lower power… and I also have a new case that and AIO that I want to migrate my current setup to as well… ah well FOMO/YOLO

Did a YOLO expert install tonight to spinning rust since guided always wanted or seemed to prefer SSD or nVME.

It went well after I worked my way around what YAST was trying to do.

Any tips on removing other two installs plus random EFI boot parts other than scoping them out in a part editor? Im not expecting anything as it should be pretty straight forward barring, a dumbass moment/whoops…

I am still pretty well like opensuse tumbleweed since it gets me newer packages which was my goal given Intel dGOU and Ryzen 7000 series CPU… amazed to regularly see in btop that CPU is at 400 MHz… never see it that low in windows…

Probably should start another thread but any idea about re-enabling AMD ‘iGPU’(not really as its on the IO die but is effectively an iGPU) and running it w/the arc dGPU? Apparently in windows that gets power usage VERY low but adds latency… Ive only seen reports wrt Intel CPUs/iGPU and arc managing to pass through to mobo output BUT Ive read one comment claiming that it also works w/AMD Ryzen 7000 series, more of a point of interest than anything else as I generally average less than 24W over the course of a day under windows for non-gaming use.