Feedback on liquid electrical tape

I am looking for feedback on users of liquid electrical tape.

How durable is it compared to electrical tape ?

Does the can dry up after a few uses.

I had that experience with Plasti Dip.

I made a complaint with the company, but never heard back. :slight_smile:

Thanks.

who uses this product?

As a 40+ year telephone/data installer, as well as an electronics enthusiast and Amateur Radio operator I’ll toss in my opinion. If working in a small confined space, say repairing a small wire strap on a circuit board, your only option may be liquid tape. In most other cases, I would recommend using tape (my preferred being Scotch(r) Super 88. When dealing with antenna connectors exposed to the elements, I prefer a rubber mastic tape. As with any thing you do- use the right tool for the job. Also remember, not all things are equal. I can go to the hardware store and buy a roll of electrical tape for $.50 or $3.00 for a roll of the Scotch tape, and will spend the $3.00. Why? Because it remains more flexible in extreme conditions, less likely to become brittle over time, more resistant to things like alkalis, acids, abrasions, etc. If you are in a situation where you must use liquid tape, do your homework and find the best, not necessarily the cheapest. Also, never rely on a single coat, it may take 2 or 3 in order to achieve some level of uniformity. If you are using an aerosol, usually holding the can upside down and spraying till the nozzle clears will suffice. Typically, the can doesn’t ‘dry’ up, rather the propellant leeches over time. If you find you need just a wee bit more to finish the job and don’t need a whole new can, try hitting the side of the can with a hammer or against a sharp hard object. This should compress the remaining propellant enough to give you a few more sprays.

Hope this helps

btw, I do not work for, nor have any vested interest in 3M or any of its affiliates. I only used their product as an example of something I use personally.

On 2014-06-14 16:56, sparkz alot wrote:
>
> As a 40+ year telephone/data installer, as well as an electronics
> enthusiast and Amateur Radio operator I’ll toss in my opinion. If
> working in a small confined space, say repairing a small wire strap on a
> circuit board, your only option may be liquid tape. In most other cases,
> I would recommend using tape (my preferred being Scotch(r) Super 88.
> When dealing with antenna connectors exposed to the elements, I prefer a
> rubber mastic tape.

When I can, I prefer heat shrink tubing, but it takes more time to use,
and is expensive. The result is very neat.

I have also once used “cold shrink” tubing from 3M, for thick cables (2
cm diameter). I don’t know what sizes they make, but I still have one
sample which says 1000V and for direct burial. Very good stuff, sturdy.

In general I dislike adhesive insulator tape: eventually they all come
off, even good brands: they take more years, but they unwrap at the end.
Thus, for electrical cable I would use adhesive tape on the inner
cables, and for the external overall cover I use what in Spanish we call
“autorecauchutante” tape, maybe it is what you call “rubber mastic
tape”. It is difficult to apply on thin cables or confined spaces.

Liquid tape I have never seen. I must look it up. I have used “urethane”
insulator spray on finished printed circuit boards. Maybe is that what
you mean? I never thought on using it for cables.

> btw, I do not work for, nor have any vested interest in 3M or any of its
> affiliates. I only used their product as an example of something I use
> personally.

Same here.

By the way… recently I bought several rolls of what I think you call
“duct tape”, here called “American tape”. I just wanted to cover the
edge of some metal struts (I built some sturdy shelves, but those edges
are somewhat dangerous, they can cause cuts on my hands). I bought the
tape at what here we call “Chinese shops”, at about 1/3 the price of a
brand name. I needed many meters, so I bought cheap.

Well, the tape is good enough, but the adhesive is horrible: it comes
off within the day. I lost money (little) and time (hours).


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

When I can, I prefer heat shrink tubing, but it takes more time to use,
and is expensive. The result is very neat.

I have also once used “cold shrink” tubing from 3M, for thick cables (2
cm diameter). I don’t know what sizes they make, but I still have one
sample which says 1000V and for direct burial. Very good stuff, sturdy.

In general I dislike adhesive insulator tape: eventually they all come
off, even good brands: they take more years, but they unwrap at the end.
Thus, for electrical cable I would use adhesive tape on the inner
cables, and for the external overall cover I use what in Spanish we call
“autorecauchutante” tape, maybe it is what you call “rubber mastic
tape”. It is difficult to apply on thin cables or confined spaces.

Liquid tape I have never seen. I must look it up. I have used “urethane”
insulator spray on finished printed circuit boards. Maybe is that what
you mean? I never thought on using it for cables.

Good point on the ‘heat shrink’, I also use these, thought more for the hobby rather than professionally. Comes in handy sizes and lengths. In a pinch, if you don’t have a heat gun, I find a match will do the trick :slight_smile: . Liquid tape, at least from my experience, will come in a tube or a can with a small brush applicator. They do have an aerosol sealant, but that is typically intended for large area applications, such as repairing a crack in a boat, a hole in a bucket, etc., where a bit of ‘over spray’ is acceptable. Your “autorecauchutante” tape is probably similar, if not the same as our “rubber mastic” tape, sorry, I could not ‘google’ that name, but here is an example of what I’m referring to (note the same disclaimers apply):

I use this, as you say, and primarily outdoor applications such as sealing antenna connections. Though once used, it is very difficult to remove :slight_smile:

By the way… recently I bought several rolls of what I think you call
“duct tape”, here called “American tape”. I just wanted to cover the
edge of some metal struts (I built some sturdy shelves, but those edges
are somewhat dangerous, they can cause cuts on my hands). I bought the
tape at what here we call “Chinese shops”, at about 1/3 the price of a
brand name. I needed many meters, so I bought cheap.

Well, the tape is good enough, but the adhesive is horrible: it comes
off within the day. I lost money (little) and time (hours).


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

Sounds like our duct tape, which is a household staple here. No decent tool box doesn’t have at least 1 roll of duct tape. I’ve used it for almost every type of repair, I even fixed an old pair of slippers, though my sister laughed at my fashion sense :slight_smile: .

As for your shelves, you might try “HVAC (heating and air conditioning tape) Foil Tape”, though it has a metallic backing, it has excellent adhesive quality’s. Well, it has to as it’s exposed to the elements 365 days of the year. If you don’t like the look of the foil, you could just cover it with your “American Tape” :smiley:

On 2014-06-15 18:46, sparkz alot wrote:

> Good point on the ‘heat shrink’, I also use these, thought more for the
> hobby rather than professionally. Comes in handy sizes and lengths. In a
> pinch, if you don’t have a heat gun, I find a match will do the trick
> :slight_smile:

I use a cigarette lighter :slight_smile:

I once got a small gas powered soldering iron, with interchangeable
tips. One of them blowed directed hot gasses. Unfortunately, the
refillable gas container had a leak, so I stopped using it (I noticed
the leak after using it for a single job on a place with no mains, the
car probably), and never got another one.

I’ll try to make do without an small electric hot air blower, unless I
need to do a lot of connections. The kind I have seen are way to big for
the small and confined spaces I have to work with. But gas lighter
flames go always “up”, so they are complicated to use as well…

> . Liquid tape, at least from my experience, will come in a tube or a
> can with a small brush applicator.

Interesting. I have not seen it, but it does look interesting.

> Your “autorecauchutante” tape is probably
> similar, if not the same as our “rubber mastic” tape, sorry, I could not
> ‘google’ that name, but here is an example of what I’m referring to
> (note the same disclaimers apply):
>
> http://tinyurl.com/n93zo32

Yes, I think it is the same. I could not find a translation.

Interestingly, I once got a surplus roll of military stuff, nominally
the same. They gave it to me because the end use date had passed by
much. It has no brand name that I can see; it comes with a layer of
protective transparent cellophane tape, and has a green line of
“something” along the black rubber tape.

The “interesting” thing is that it is almost useless, because it almost
does not stick itself, contrary to the rolls I buy in electricity shops
which last for ever.

What I use it is to wrap shiny metal things, like water taps and such,
before using gripping tools. It protects them from the scratches :wink:

> I use this, as you say, and primarily outdoor applications such as
> sealing antenna connections. Though once used, it is very difficult to
> remove :slight_smile:

Yes, absolutely. It is a temptation to cut the cable instead :wink:

>> Well, the tape is good enough, but the adhesive is horrible: it comes
>> off within the day. I lost money (little) and time (hours).

> Sounds like our duct tape, which is a household staple here. No decent
> tool box doesn’t have at least 1 roll of duct tape. I’ve used it for
> almost every type of repair, I even fixed an old pair of slippers,
> though my sister laughed at my fashion sense :slight_smile: .

Yes, we see it a lot on the movies (MacGyver comes to mind). Usually
some guy ties hands and legs of somebody else with it, or repairs an
engine somehow so they can escape from the bad guys :slight_smile:

> As for your shelves, you might try “HVAC (heating and air conditioning
> tape) Foil Tape”, though it has a metallic backing, it has excellent
> adhesive quality’s. Well, it has to as it’s exposed to the elements 365
> days of the year. If you don’t like the look of the foil, you could just
> cover it with your “American Tape” :smiley:

He.

I used that “Chinese tape”, but had to apply a glue of the kind used for
general jobs. Ceys, I don’t know if you have the brand there. The tape
is about the same colour as my metal shelves, so it is a reasonable choice.

Lesson learned, I’ll never again buy a Chinese adhesive. At least till
they manage to clone the chemicals properly :wink:

I did not consider that foil tape you mention, though. Probably much
more expensive. I’ll have a look for it.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

I use Scotch tape also, worth paying extra.



[Mastic](http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-mastic.htm) adhesive  is a very strong bonding agent used in many commercial and industrial  settings, but is perhaps most popular for setting tiles and sealing  windows, walls, and ceilings in building construction. It is  traditionally derived from the [resin](http://www.wisegeek.org/what-is-resin.htm) of the mastic tree, which is where it gets its name, though it is commonly manufactured synthetically as well.

I am impressed by the qualities of mastic.

On a recent job, I came to the conclusion that wire nuts are not very reliable.

I even used electrical tape as well around the nuts.

Two of them came loose, so I soldered the wires and used Scotch Super 88 tape.