Does any one know about RUNTIME REVOLUTION?

I just look at front of me when I start slowly to clean up my desktop that I have a DVD from Linux-format LXF 40DMay2003 yes six years ago.
I like to know if one of you know about RUNTIME REVOLUTION?:wink:

Mike

On Fri, 08 May 2009 00:16:01 +0000, 1michael1 wrote:

> I just look at front of me when I start slowly to clean up my desktop
> that I have a DVD from Linux-format LXF 40DMay2003 yes six years ago. I
> like to know if one of you know about RUNTIME REVOLUTION?:wink:

Yes. :slight_smile:

Jim

No. :frowning:

There ya go! Now you’ve got the choice… :wink:

Undecided. :expressionless:

Just to complete a normal voting pattern… :expressionless:

On Fri, 08 May 2009 10:46:02 +0000, Confuseling wrote:

> No. :frowning:
>
> There ya go! Now you’ve got the choice… :wink:

LOL

no

but i have a question for you: Just how much attention DO you need
each day?


heartless_bot

heartless_bot wrote:

> no
>
> but i have a question for you: Just how much attention DO you need
> each day?
>
Funny, you make a statement about another member attacking someone
in another thread, and then say something that could be considered an
attack. Only difference here is this one is a bit more subtle.

> Funny, you make a statement about another member attacking someone
> in another thread, and then say something that could be considered an
> attack. Only difference here is this one is a bit more subtle.

in the other case i was stating an absolute fact…

in this case i was trying to be subtle and hoping he could/would take
the hint…


heartless_bot

On Fri, 08 May 2009 18:59:00 +0000, heartless_bot wrote:

> in this case i was trying to be subtle and hoping he could/would take
> the hint…

A smiley would probably have helped you make that subtlety easier to see.

Jim

sorry :slight_smile:


heartless_bot

On Fri, 08 May 2009 20:32:54 +0000, heartless_bot wrote:

> sorry :slight_smile:

Hey, we all make mistakes. It’s what you take away from doing so that
matters. :slight_smile:

(I kinda suspected you were at least half-joking, 1michael1 does seem
quite prolific :wink: )

Jim

We used the product in an application for three years with disappointing results before switching to a standard Java language with good success.

A young intern from the University of Washington told me that his Computer Science professor told him, that RunRev violates a “precedence rule” in that it operates over the top of both Microsoft and Apple’s operating system hierarchy. The professor said that so doing may cause incompatibility problems thus making programs potentially unstable and unsafe.

I am wondering if the quirkiness and fragility we experienced with Orbiter partially has something to do with this.

What is unique about our application is that we communicate to RFID readers and gain data at unpredictable times.

Runrev consultive programmers were never able to solve the data problem. We used Runtime Revolutions own people to write the program.

RunRev does not have an extensive library of common routines for connecting to disparate devices or manipulating date time data.

It seems optimized for gamming or for electrical engineers who have limited programming skils, and need to build a proof of concept.

I read that Runrev slows down when too many of it’s programming cards are used, and if true is a sure limitation to growing a consumer product’s future functionality.

Is Runtime Revolution really “house of cards” method of programming? The larger the build the more fragile the outcome. The cards then come crashing down?

Supporting this is Runrevs own Programmers who have expressed frustration adn inability to document the program properly as the size has increased. This does not make sense to me, but I will take it at face value.

Gamming programming may be great! Prototyping super! But what other applications should be avoided?

If any of the above is true, knowing the truth helps people It prevents financial loss, lost time, and most important “safety”. As all programmers are aware, using a program wrongly can literally “kill” when used for “batch / processing, device control” in manufacturing.:expressionless:

I’ve used it for many years on Windows and OS X with good success, but have only started using it on Linux. Video and a few others things aren’t quite as smooth in Linux as on the other supported platforms, but for ultra-rapid GUI development it’s hard to beat.

But do yourself a favor: if your only copy is six years old check out a more recent version. A lot’s happened with the product since then. :slight_smile:

The Rev articles from Tom Russell at Novell may be helpful:
Cool Solutions: Author Profile: Stomfi