Data Recovery and Disk Management

I am new to Linux especially Suse Linux. I installed Suse Linux 12.2 on
a computer. I am a Windows and Apple guy. So, be gentle with me. I
have two questions regarding Disk Management and Recovery software. Keep
in mind, I am a GUI interface guy. I am not a command line, DOS like
person. I like the look and feel of icons and using the mouse.

  1. Disk Management, I am looking for a GUI interface disk manager
    similar to what you would find on a Windows computer. Any suggestions
    on a Disk Manager? I want to create, delete, and resize partitions.

  2. Recovery Software, I need a good recovery software or tool to
    recover files and documents from a second hard drive. Again, it has to
    have a GUI interface. In the Windows world, we have all kinds of
    Recovery software at our disposal. In the Linux world, is there really
    good recovery software?

Thanks,

Philip

Hello and welcome to the forum!

I am not a command line, DOS like
person.

We got dos beat by a mile. The command line can be quite useful, but I certainly understand. No worries, openSUSE is a very gui friendly operating system. Though I should like to stress. Linux is not Windows and will not try to be.

  1. Disk Management, I am looking for a GUI interface disk manager
    similar to what you would find on a Windows computer. Any suggestions
    on a Disk Manager? I want to create, delete, and resize partitions.

Default on openSUSE is the yast2 control centre. It includes a fantastic full featured partition tool. There are also alternatives such as gparted. Note most filesystems are not able to be modified unless they are unmounted. So some filesystem operations should be done from a live cd session.

  1. Recovery Software, I need a good recovery software or tool to
    recover files and documents from a second hard drive. Again, it has to
    have a GUI interface. In the Windows world, we have all kinds of
    Recovery software at our disposal. In the Linux world, is there really
    good recovery software?

I have no idea. I only do important stuff like this with my own two hands, so someone else can answer there. Hope you get everything sorted, and again welcome. :slight_smile:

On 2012-10-31 03:06, jkbmjp1 wrote:

> 1. Disk Management, I am looking for a GUI interface disk manager
> similar to what you would find on a Windows computer. Any suggestions
> on a Disk Manager? I want to create, delete, and resize partitions.

Yast partition manager module, perhaps. Or gparted. There are live CD having it, like
SystemRescueCd, for example.

> 2. Recovery Software, I need a good recovery software or tool to
> recover files and documents from a second hard drive.

Please describe. You mean a damaged disk?


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

HI, 1 : For disk management, use the yast tool, as others have pointed out. 2 - For data backup/recovery, you might be interested in this freeware tool: Redo BackupBare Metal Restore Solution GUI Backup Open Source GPL Recovery HTH Lenwolf

On 10/31/2012 03:50 AM, Carlos E. R. wrote:
>> 2. Recovery Software
> Please describe. You mean a damaged disk?

right:

  • do you mean from damaged disk(s), hardware failure?

  • or an operational disk suffering from (say) inadvertent data deletion,
    or sorry-i-did-that-format-thing-prior-to-backing-up, or
    i-forgot-the-crypto-password, or ???

  • what is(are) the file system(s) in use on that disk

  • is(are) the disk(s) part of a RAID or LVM

regardless of the answers, i advise you:

  1. do not mount that drive as read/write until you are sure you have
    recovered all recoverable data…because any writing to the drive is
    likely to increase the amount of non-recoverable data…

  2. weigh carefully the value of the data ‘misplaced’ and to be recovered
    before diving in…because data recovery is a very specialized field and
    even most “power users” are ill equipped to and learning as you go with
    valuable data might not be the best way to learn…

  3. there are about a million (or less) folks on the net advertising
    themselves as data recovery experts: do not look for the least
    expensive–real data recovery is expensive, very expensive…so Caveat
    Emptor!

  4. some basic Recovery Technician info:

https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Aen.opensuse.org+data+recovery
https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Aforums.opensuse.org+data+recovery


dd http://goo.gl/PUjnL
http://tinyurl.com/DD-Caveat http://tinyurl.com/DD-Hardware
http://tinyurl.com/DD-Software

For disk management you can use live cd like SystemRescueCd and for data recovery you can use Kernel for Linux software. The good thing about this tool is it runs on Windows based system and recovers data from Linux partitions.

Am 02.11.2012 12:06, schrieb syncmaster632:
> The good thing about
> this tool is it runs on Windows based system
I would be interested to understand what is good about that?
That means you not only have to buy a license for “Kernel” but also one
for Windows to recover your linux data?

@jkpmjb1:
Have a look at testdisk+photorec for data recovery
http://www.cgsecurity.org/


PC: oS 12.2 x86_64 | i7-2600@3.40GHz | 16GB | KDE 4.8.5 | GeForce GT 420
ThinkPad E320: oS 12.2 x86_64 | i3@2.30GHz | 8GB | KDE 4.9.2 | HD 3000
eCAFE 800: oS 11.4 i586 | AMD Geode LX 800@500MHz | 512MB | lamp server

I may be dumb, but it completely eludes me what is the “good thing” here.

And of course there a re hundreds of ways to backup data from your Linux system. To other (Linux) systems, to removable storage. Just backup the latest status, or cyclic, or multiple cyvles (daily within weekly, etc.)

It is not the tool that you choose in the end. The diffuculty is to design your backup policy: what is the situation/disaster you want to recover from, how much can you loose (how often do you backup), from how long ago do you want to be able to restore (an e-mail from four years ago that is important in a legal claim, a file as it was in january because you now found out you broke it in february), and more. And when you have written down your policy, you go and find tools, storage media, of line storage, to implement it.

Am 02.11.2012 12:23, schrieb Martin Helm:
> @jkpmjb1:
> Have a look at testdisk+photorec for data recovery
> http://www.cgsecurity.org/
I see Carlos already suggested SystemRescueCD which contains photorec
and testdisk from what I see.
The parted magic live cd also contains them.

I always keep a collection of live cd’s like gparted and parted magic
and knoppix available, not that I need them often, but in the rare cases
you need one you are happy to have it (esp. if you have friends who
often trash their systems for them I also have an antivirus live cd in
my bag).


PC: oS 12.2 x86_64 | i7-2600@3.40GHz | 16GB | KDE 4.8.5 | GeForce GT 420
ThinkPad E320: oS 12.2 x86_64 | i3@2.30GHz | 8GB | KDE 4.9.2 | HD 3000
eCAFE 800: oS 11.4 i586 | AMD Geode LX 800@500MHz | 512MB | lamp server

Am 02.11.2012 12:56, schrieb hcvv:
> It is not the tool that you choose in the end. The diffuculty is to
> design your backup policy: what is the situation/disaster you want
> to recover from, how much can you loose (how often do you backup),
> from how long ago do you want to be able to restore (an e-mail from
> four years ago that is important in a legal claim, a file as it was
> in january because you now found out you broke it in february), and
> more. And when you have written down your policy, you go and find
> tools, storage media, of line storage, to implement it.
>
That is for sure absolutely correct, but maybe a bit overkill for home
use (I mean to have a proper spec for disaster recovery and backup at home).
To be honest at home the most important things for me and my family is
the data in home (documents written, emails, photos …).
All the rest can be reinstalled and reconfigured (takes time, but
doesn’t matter as long as you run no high availability server or data
center at home).
For that purpose backintime (uses rsync under the hood) turned out to be
an invaluable tool, since family can create backup snapshots with a
mouse click and recovery from that works well (tested that with single
files as well as with full recovery to a certain snapshot).
This backups go to an external hard disk here, from time to time I burn
the snapshots to dvd’s to save them from loss of that external backup
drive (using slow write speeds and verify after burn and always make
more than one copy). The oldest backup (cd in that case) I have still
lying around and have not thrown away are about 10 years old and readable.

That comment is of course only for home use and not for professional use.


PC: oS 12.2 x86_64 | i7-2600@3.40GHz | 16GB | KDE 4.8.5 | GeForce GT 420
ThinkPad E320: oS 12.2 x86_64 | i3@2.30GHz | 8GB | KDE 4.9.2 | HD 3000
eCAFE 800: oS 11.4 i586 | AMD Geode LX 800@500MHz | 512MB | lamp server

On 2012-11-02 12:56, hcvv wrote:
>
> syncmaster632;2500754 Wrote:
>> … The good thing about this tool is it runs on Windows based system
>> and recovers data from Linux partitions.
> I may be dumb, but it completely eludes me what is the “good thing”
> here.

Ditto.

Somehow, that post sounds familiar… I think I saw it weeks ago. A deja
vu feeling… ;-I


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

Unix, Linux and Mac OS X
On Unix-based and Unix-like operating systems such as Linux and older versions of Mac OS X, it is possible to use multiple partitions on a disk device. Each partition can be used for a file system or as a swap partition.

Multiple partitions also allow directories such as – tmp, – usr, – var, or home directory space to be allocated their own file system. Such a scheme has a number of potential advantages:

  • If one file system gets corrupted, the data outside that filesystem- partition stay intact, minimizing data loss.
  • Specific file systems can be mounted read-only, or with the execution of setuid files disabled (thus enhancing security).
  • Performance may be enhanced due to less disk head travel.
  • A program which produces too much output (such as a system logging daemon) fills up only a single filesystem, therefore does not fill up more critical filesystems. (Often systems will not function correctly if – or – tmp fills up.)

However, the disadvantage of subdividing the drive into fixed-size partitions is that a file system in one partition may become full, even though other file systems still have plenty of usable space.

A good partitioning scheme requires the user to predict how much space each partition will need, which may be a difficult task; especially for new users. Logical volume management (LVM), often used in servers, increases flexibility by allowing data in volumes to expand into separate physical disks (which can be added when needed). Another option is to resize existing partitions when necessary. LVM allows this easily by resizing (shrinking) a filesystem, reducing the size of the logical volume containing that filesystem, allocating that freed space to another logical volume, and expanding (resizing) this other filesystem.

Typical Linux desktop systems use two partitions: one holding a file system mounted on “- ” (the root directory) and a swap partition.

By default, Mac OS X systems also use a single partition for the entire filesystem, but use a swap file inside the file system (like Windows) rather than a swap partition visit recoversdata. com