Automounting DVD problem, unmounting fails

When changing DVDs, automounting the new one and autounmounting the old one will fails on my system about 90% of the time.

I’m using openSUSE 12.2 with xfce. The folder in /run/media/username/oldDisc will be empty and keep the old name after swapping discs. Thunar on the other hand will show the new disc’s name next to the drive’s symbol, still linking to the outdated folder.

I can however manually umount /dev/sr0 as root. The new DVD is then mounted correctly when I click on the drive’s symbol in thunar.

Is there anything I can do about this?

I hope you first click the Save removal button or Eject (somewhere, I am not an xfv=ce user) before physicaly removing the DVD. Because as you describe it you just eject it manualy

I’m just ejecting the disc. If I had to click safe unmount buttons anyway I’d prefer the old (u)mount style and disable auto altogether. But I haven’t figured out how to do this.

I’m not a XFCE user, but maybe this guide is helpful?
Using Removable Media [Xfce Docs]

Maybe this advice applies too?

[xfce] Add “Unmount” to Right Click Context Menu? - Ubuntu Forums](http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2058286)

I must admit some XFCE documentation still talks of HAL, and this is has been deprecated, but I assume (hope) that Thunar has been updated to use udev/udisks now.

It is just following Netwon’s first law(inertia)
I always make it a point to right click in the file manager (nautilus in my case) to unmount flash drives and eject cds/dvds
This will ensure that no more writes or reads are being done on this device. If we just pull out our flash drives then it may potentially damage the drives.
I started out floppies, so i never ever just pull out any external storage lest the device gets destroyed.
These were very sensitive devices and would get spoiled if we mess with the sliding stuff at the top of the device. Also i remember checking and double checking and carefully flipping the read write switch on the surface of the device before using it.

Sounds like very sensible to me. The sytem can realy not predict if the end-user decides to remove a device in the next moment.

In fact I do not understand what the OP means with the word “autounmount” in his first post here. But I may have missed the newest developements in this earea.

When I eject the medium it will stay mounted in my filesystem, at least partially. That is, the link in /run/media/username/someDVD is not removed when I eject the disc. By autounmount I meant removing it from the file system after pressing the drive’s eject button.

The problem still exists when I use the eject command or thunar’s (presumably safe) eject button. I believe this is a software bug or configuration problem.

I concede that checking and unmounting manually is probably the cleanest and safest way to do it, but when a system offers automounting then using it shouldn’t clutter the filesystem, especially with read only media like DVD.

The problem still exists when I use the eject command or thunar’s (presumably safe) eject button. I believe this is a software bug or configuration problem.

If this is the case, then I agree that a bug report should be filed. The Ubuntu thread that I linked to earlier suggested that you can add a ‘Places’ plugin to your panel that would show removable media. It would allow you to unmount the media with a simple right-click apparently.

As I tried to explain earlier, when you “eject” the medium by pressing the button (instead of using an eject command or equivalent “save remove” or similar click function), it is just thrown out. No unmounting takes place at all. And one of the things that proves this is the mountpoint still being there. IMHO there isn’t such a thing as autounmount. When you think different can you please point me to some documentation?

Using the eject button on the hardware is one thing (and I think most would understand that this would preclude filesystem unmounting), but when done via a volume manager (or CLI) as the OP stated

The problem still exists when I use the eject command or thunar’s (presumably safe) eject button. I believe this is a software bug or configuration problem.

then file system unmounting should be taken care of (as is the case with the KDE’s notifier and Dolphin’s ‘eject’ options).

Sorry, my comment was on the first part of post #9 and on the usage of the word “autounmount”.

The second part of post #9 indeed specifies that the OP does do things as they should be. But I do not see any “auto” in there. You just give the command to umount and it umounts (and physicaly ejects the medium when applicable).

And when the OP (and we) have the idea that after doing such an eject command or clicking on the correct place in some file manager does not unmount, then that should be proven by the output of the

mount

command.

Yes, I think that the OP was a little unfamiliar with the underlying unmounting processes. (This is often the case for those more familiar with GUI rather than CLI methods). [/QUOTE]

And when the OP (and we) have the idea that after doing such an eject command or clicking on the correct place in some file manager does not unmount, then that should be proven by the output of the

mount

command.

I agree. It would be good to see the facts, rather than a verbal description (which may not be accurate) :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=deano_ferrari;2522451(This is often the case for those more familiar with GUI rather than CLI methods). [/QUOTE]
Yes, those GUI users often seem to thing that computers is (black or white) magic. >:)

I would attribute this issue with not only Computers but all technologies. Does, everyone know the internal workings of a car before learning to drive one. Short answer would be no. Since Linux offers more powerful command line tools than GUI ones, people using Linux appreciate the power of CLI. Also GUI applications do provide command line options in Linux ,but many/most of applications in Microsoft OSes don’t provide the same.

I think my remark goes deeper. It is not that they do not know the internal workings. As you say we all do not know all internal workings of all apparatus we use. It is that people real think it is magic. I do not know if that is because people can not cope with the fact that they do not know or understand something and that they thus soothen themselves with seeing it a as done by some higher power nobody understands.

As you do not know how something works saying that it is “automatic” does not only not help in increasing your knowledge about something. It will effectively block you trying to increase your knowledge to make you understand it. It is one reason why I allways get some sort of shiver when I read in a thread here about “automatic mounting” or “automounting”. It most often implies that he poster has no idea about what mounting is (why it is done end what it enables you to do with the bits on the device), but also that they, by e.g. clicking somewhere (in the device notifier pop-up or elsewhere), are doing that mounting. There is no magic: you did the mounting!

This is not only about (un)mounting, it is very general. It is special widespread amongst managers :frowning:
We once had problems with a system. I do not know what exactly. May be crashing from time to time. So we were trying to debug that. And of course the manager responsible wanted reports. So far, so good. But then he started to throw in his own suggestions which were, he not being a computer technical person, lost time and energy to say it friendly. I ended up suggesting to him that we should burn some white chicken feathers in front of the system and bow deep for it. He didn’t like it, but failed to explain why my suggestion was worse then his >:(

I think you were at your wit’s end. :slight_smile: