ypbind misbehaving depending on ifup/networkmanger setting

All,

I have a clean 32bit opensuse 12.1 system using the networkmanager instead of ifup. The systeem is using a NIS domain and the NIS server is reachable.
Logging in as a (NIS) user fails (unexpected!). Login as root is succesfull but

rcypbind status reports that it’s up and running however
ypcat passwd reports ‘No such map passwd.byname. Reason: Can’t bind to server which serves this domain.’
ypwhich reports ‘Can’t communicate with ypbind’
ypbind -c reports the correct ypserver and /etc/yp.conf is ok

This can be solved by ‘rcypbind restart’. After which normal users can login (as expected).

Another way of solving this is by using ifup instead of the networkmanager. Then the system behaves as expected (NIS users can login).

This behavior is also reproducible on a 64bit system.

Any ideas how to debug this further, I haven’t found this anywhere as a known error. Or am I missing somewhere something :wink:

Well, I thought that Network manager is the solution to the end user managing the network connection(s) (in the case that a system is wandering around, the enduser deciding what connection to use where he is at that moment in place and time). For that the enduser must of course be loged in (in a GUI). But as loging in requires the password information being available and in a NIS environment that requires a network connection to the NIS server, IMHO you have an chicken/egg problem.

You might be right, however this setup has been used with 11.4 … and there it worked. But I will check. I’ll reinstall 11.4 on my testsystem and see what happens.

Is there any reason why you use Network manager? Well, I guess there is, nobody would do that without reason :wink:

I mean, when the system is bound to the NIS server (and maybe bound to more services on the LAN) to functionn propeerly, it will most probably have a fixed IP address, etc. Or do I misunderstand your environment completely?

Just installed a 11.4 system from dvd, using my NIS server and automounter and network controlled by network manager … NIS user can login as expected.

Therefore something somewhere has changed in 12.1.

About my environment: I have a “server” who acts as db-server, ftp server, dhcp server, NIS server, NFS server, mail server, audio-video stream server etc.
All user are NIS users and their home directories are exported via NFS and mounted via the automounter.

The computer experience I want to give to my family (= my users) is: go behind a computer, login and you will get everywhere YOUR environment. At home we don’t have “Personal Computers” we just have computers.

The server has a fixed IP-address and is connected to the internet, and is running openSUSE 11.4
All clients have a “fixed” ip address controlled by the dhcp server (via /etc/dhcpd.conf).

Now your hardest question: why do I use the network manager …
Basically because this gives my users (e.g. my family) a “MS Windows” experience. I like to get as close as possible to the MS-Windows look and feel. That’s what my users want, that’s what they get. That’s also the reason why they have KDE as the GUI.
May not make sense to you, but it does to me and my family :slight_smile:

As you may guess I have a number of systems at home. Only two systems, which were installed from dvd as a new install, have this behavior. The other systems do not have this behavior. As far as I remember those systems were installed as an “update”.
I’ll try to “update” my test 11.4 system to 12.1 and see what happens just to double check.

However all other ideas and suggestions are welcome!!

Logging in succesfully as root means nothing, root is not in the NIS users, so it’s just a local login.

To use NIS, you need to use ifup, so that the network exists when the NIS client starts. Thus the authentication can be done when the user tries to login in a desktop. If the NIS client cannot connect to the NIS server, you will not even see the usernames in gdm for example.

I did NOT login as root, logged in as user “tester” which is a NIS user. Login happened just after the (11.4) system was booted.

Now your hardest question: why do I use the network manager …
Basically because this gives my users (e.g. my family) a “MS Windows” experience. I

All reasonable argumentation ends here.

Logging in succesfully as root means nothing, root is not in the NIS users, so it’s just a local login. To use NIS, you need to use ifup, so that the network exists when the NIS client starts. Thus the authentication can be done when the user tries to login in a desktop. If the NIS client cannot connect to the NIS server, you will not even see the usernames in gdm for example.

Ha Arjan,

A dutch thread here…

What you describe is what I have been having for years now. NIS for the user administration, NFS to export /home (and Music, VIdeo’s, Install ISO’s etc). Except for the windu appearance. Like I wrote above, this cannot be achieved using the Networkmanager. Networkmanager (and connection to server) start after user login. And user login depends on NIS server, so Networkmanager and NIS are conflicting pieces of software. If you use laptops that need to be taken out of the house, NIS is not an option.
What I use, is static IP’s all over the place, Google’s DNS’s, firewalled router, NIS server + clients, NFS to export /home. Works like a charm and has done for ages.

Knurpht,

Thanks for the reply. You might have an explanation that it SHOULD NOT work, or even that it was designed not to work BUT I have just installed a 11.4 machine (dvd new install) where the network is managed by networkmanager and users are controlled/managed by my NIS server where the home directories get mounted via the automounter.

I’ve even shutdown and booted the machine after which:

  1. I logged in as user “tester” (a NIS user!)
  2. started a terminal and;
    grep tester /etc/password did not give a result
    who reported that only user tester was logged in
    ypcat passwd reported all the NIS users (including tester)
  3. I even started YaST to double check that network settings were controlled by the network manager (indeed: got a warning stating that the network is controlled by network manager)

If you are still not convinced I can publish screen shots and logfiles.

You may have an explanation why it should NOT work; I have the proof that it DOES work, at least in 11.4. If I find time I will even upgrade it to 12.1 and see what happens.
I’ll keep you posted!!

Meanwhile if you have any idea/suggestion what magic I might have done to make it work … please let me know.
I think it’s really interesting to understand why a clean 12.1 has this behaviour and a clean 11.4 install not. We then know what went wrong and what it has thought us :wink:

The New systemd start up may be doing things in a different sequence. Try using the older systemV startup. you can try by pressing F5 I think and selecting there.

If it works this should be reported on Bugzilla.