Yast Bootloader problems

Hello People,

I have partitions (fdisk -l):

Disk /dev/sda: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders, total 488397168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xf732f84b

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 4094 425920511 212958209 f W95 Ext’d (LBA)
/dev/sda4 425920512 488397167 31238328 83 Linux
/dev/sda5 4096 4208639 2102272 82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda6 4210688 46153727 20971520 83 Linux
/dev/sda7 46155776 425920511 189882368 83 Linux

I installed BackTrack Linux (ubuntu-like) on sda4. I had opensuse 11.4 already installed on sda6 (root partition) and home on (sda7). When I was installed backtrack, I skipped the option of installing bootloader (upon reading from various posts).

I completely lost the bootloader, and then I used ‘Rescatux’ to boot into backtrack. I modified the bootloader settings and now I am in OpenSuse 11.4.

However, I still cannot get my bootloader to reflect both OpenSuse and Backtrack.

Here is my problem:

When I open the yast-bootloader, I ‘propose new configuration’ and I get the settings as shown in the screenshot5.png (screenshot5 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!). However, when I try to save it, I get the settings get changed (screenshot6.png, screenshot6 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!). I fail to understand why I get ‘/tmp’ prefix to all my kernel image and ram-disk image locations.

Also, when I try to add ‘new image’, the bootloader basically deletes all configurations, and I end up with screenshot7.png (screenshot7 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!).

Can I get some help? Sorry for external links for flickr, I could not upload screenshots here.

Thanks a lot

Devendra

Can you boot backtrack?

In there, open a terminal and do

sudo update-grub

then

sudo grub-install /dev/sda

That should setup the bootloader for backtrack (assuming it’s ubuntu based and uses grub2)

If you want the suse bootloader back, the easiest way is to follow this:
Re-Install Grub Quickly with Parted Magic
Later you can add an entry for backtrack

Thanks a lot caf4926! However, I cannot boot into backtrack now. I retried something in the bootloader configuration, and messed it up completely, eventually deciding to re-install OpenSuse. I still have backtrack in sda7, and a dumb entry in the bootloader menu generated by yast. I did some reading to find out that Ubuntu-style OSes do not have a separated /boot. Instead, it is enough to just point the bootloader (?) to the kernel image. I see an entry “vmlinuz-2.6.38” in “/media/89176fd3-5984-4731-a54d-19c58a5237b7/boot”.

Should I just add a new section in yast bootloader as “image” and point to this path. What bothers me is that during boot time, /media/89176fd3-5984-4731-a54d-19c58a5237b7/boot path may not be known.

Also, how do I backup my current bootloader settings? I presume that I should copy /dev/sda1 (where bootloader resides) using PartedMagic? Or /etc/sysconfig/boot?

I would not like to mess up my bootloader again, so it would help if I know how to restore the stuff when it gets messed up.

Thanks a lot.

Devendra Rai

You might have read the wrong posts then. Whatever Linux distro you install, never skip the option of installing the bootloader! Just pay attention to WHERE you install it.

I don’t know BackTrack. I remember there was a long thread about dualbooting with BackTrack where we tried to help and it was pretty confusing. I wonder if our conclusion wasn’t “Why not just using Ubuntu?”.

If BackTrack is installed properly with a kernel in its own partition, the script updategrub might be able to add a boot entry for it to openSUSE Grub menu: updategrub for openSUSE Legacy Grub (not update-grub!).

But is BackTrack not the one which is installed in a Windows partition or something? If so, ditch and install Ubuntu instead!

Thanks a lot please_try_again. I am interested in BackTrack since it allows me to study security aspects of Linux (at least, this is how it is advertised). So, currently, I have OpenSuse 11.4 running, and BackTrack in a separate partition.

From what I learn from here, there is no safe way of booting into BackTrack. Guess then, I will re-experiment when I update to gnome-3.0 in November, when the next release of OpenSuse is due.

About Ubuntu, I would like to stick to OpenSuse for now :slight_smile:

Thanks a lot.

You can manually edit the file
/boot/grub/menu.lst

Assuming you are correct with sda7 then: Add this

###Don't change this comment - YaST2 identifier: Original name: Mint###
title Backtrack
    root (hd0,6)
    kernel /vmlinuz root=/dev/sda7 ro quiet splash
    initrd /initrd.img

how to edit the file menu.lst, located at /boot/grub/menu.lst
This file provides the options you see in the Grub menu when you boot your computer.

KDE Users:
Open a normal user terminal and paste this code in with your mouse:


kdesu kwrite /boot/grub/menu.lst 

enter password when requested and you can now edit the file and save when done

Gnome Users:
Open a normal user terminal and paste this code in with your mouse:


gnomesu gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst 

enter password when requested and you can now edit the file and save when done.

XFCE Users:
Open a normal user terminal and paste this code in with your mouse:

xdg-su -c 'mousepad /boot/grub/menu.lst'

enter password when requested and you can now edit the file and save when done.

LXDE Users:
Open a normal user terminal and paste this code in with your mouse:

xdg-su -c 'leafpad /boot/grub/menu.lst'

enter password when requested and you can now edit the file and save when done.

:wink:

Hello People,

Thank you all for your help. Been a long time, and I am holding off changing my bootloader settings till Christmas. Thanks once again.

Devendra