Yast and atualizations, need help

OpenSuse it’s a strange O.S, very good, but much bugs. Since that i installed the O.S via DVD (version 11.2) i found errors.

One of this bugs it’s the update of the system. I checked and i found many files outdated, but i can not refresh this files because of dependencies. yast says that dependencies can’t be found and i have to select one of the alternatives, break the file or or something like that, don’t refresh one ou more files e etc. How i can fix-it?

Configuration of Display it’s another problem. My display it’s old and don’t support resolutions better than 1024x768, however the system insists in the resolution 1152x864 and my display is simmering until I switch to a lower resolution. the funny is that when i dumb the resolution the display stay normal, but when i restart the system the resolution back to 1152x864

One more thing, i don’t know how, but it is possible that the yast install the programs in the home folder instead of installing in the /usr folder?

Thanks for help!

Please open a terminal and become su
Become su in Terminal - HowTo - openSUSE Forums

Now do this

zypper up

Programs are installed to /usr

But i can’t change this? If i use .bin packages? i can install where i want, but it’s hard to find bin packages to programs.
If i use the source, using make and make install, i can change the location of instalation?

I fail to understand your motivation for this.

andre open source wrote:
> If i use the source, using make and make install, i can change the
> location of instalation?

but why would you want to? if you buy a TV would you want to change it
into a radio? (i’m not trying to funny or disrespectful–instead, i
trying to understand why you would want programs installed to /home
and not where they normally are installed with all Linux distributions…)

what is wrong with the normal way?

and, i wonder how many different .bin packages you have
installed…and why?

are you trying to replicate the file system and procedures of a
different operating system? if so, you are just making it very much
more difficult because soon you will have a system there which no
Linux user will understand, and therefore can’t possibly help you with
the problems which WILL come, if for no other reason than you
insistence on doing it in a non-Linux way…

believe me, it is a LOT easier to do it the Linux way than to try to
do it some other way, and then have to start over…

perhaps you should read this to begin: http://en.opensuse.org/Concepts


palladium

Think about it:

You downloaded a program, and you do not want to put this program records to your O.S. this can be a reason.

You formatted your hard driver and put and put all the available space in the /home partition, and now you don’t have space to put programs in the /usr, what you do? You install your programs in the /home partition.

I have this 2 reasons.

And my display, what i have to do?

:\Thinking…
:idea:Idea…
Re-size / taking space from /home (if possible)

or

Re-install and this time get it right and leave enough space in /

andre open source wrote:
> Think abouut it:

i tried, makes my head hurt…

> You downloaded a program, and you do not want to put this program
> records to your O.S. this can be a reason.

there is no ‘registry’ entry whether the executable is in home or
somewhere else…

and, no matter where you put it it will still use libs not in home…

> You formatted your hard driver and put and put all the available space
> in the /home partition, and now you don’t have space to put programs in
> the /usr, what you do? You install your programs in the /home
> partition.

or, you start over with enough room for the root partition…mine is
20G and i’m using only 8… and i’ve added a LOT of programs…LOTS…

> And my display, what i have to do?

if you open YaST > Hardware > Graphics Card & Monitor, does the system
recognize both your monitor and graphics card correctly?

if not, see if yours is listed and select it…as well as the
resolution you wish…then follow your nose…


palladium

if you open YaST > Hardware > Graphics Card & Monitor, does the system
recognize both your monitor and graphics card correctly?

YaST > Hardware > Graphics Card & Monitor, this path does not exist. when i go to Hardware info, i found my monitor and my video card, and the info is correct. Except the maximum resolution of monitor.

if not, see if yours is listed and select it…as well as the
resolution you wish…then follow your nose…

any way, my display does not support the resolution of choice of system, and always that i dumb the resolution she back to resolution 1152x864 after restarts.

there is no ‘registry’ entry whether the executable is in home or
somewhere else…

If don’t have registry, how i can start a program tip you name in terminal? Or by way of the menu aplications of the desktop?

and have another reason: if you format your “/” partition, by any reason, you have to put all your programs again after the instalation of the O.S.

YaST > Hardware > Graphics Card & Monitor
Is not there in 11.2

type: sax
In the kicker search field and click the sax launcher that appears

procurei e encontrei algo para configurar o x11. Quand ocliquei ele foi para modo texto, voltei para a interface gráfica e ele acabou abrindo (estranho)
Meu monitor estava errado e não tem o meu modelo para escolher.
coloquei uma frequencia menor e ele pediu para testar e mandou eu escolher o tamanho.
espero que funcione.

andre open source wrote:
> espero que funcione.

i understand (with Portuguese > English help from google) that it
works correct now…does it also work when you reboot??


palladium

Ohh sorry, i forgot to translate this, i’m sorry.
is working, but i want to know…
In another Linux distribuition, that don’t have the sax, have any file that i can change to fix it (dysplay resolution), instead of programs? Or i have diferente ways for each Linux distribuition?

You have come from Windows me tinks!! Windows has one huge ever growing registry that contains all loaded programs and all settings required by these programs. When you remove a program or during execution the registry is changed and becomes bloated over time. Likewise, as you add and remove programs, the registry may become damaged and eventually all is lost … complete system meltdown.

Linux has a better way! As you add programs through the normal method of YAST or the CLI zypper , they get installed into /usr/bin and linked to their libraries /lib and usr/lib. Data you create or manage using these programs in all but a very few cases goes into your /home/<user> folder. It is done this way so that if you have many people using the same PC their data and preference setting remain private for them. When a program is installed, it’s setting, configurations, and such are stored with the program. Only when you use a program are it’s settings and configurations loaded into memory. So Linux doesn’t need a huge registry wasting space in memory for some application that may be used once every 5 years or never. When you remove a program it gets completely erased without possibility of interfering with other running programs. When you update a program, it also doesn’t interfere with other programs.

You see Windows has no concept of package management as they only give enough of a system to get you started. Any real apps you need to add yourself one at a time by finding them, download them, install them (which modifies the registry) and windows only knows about the app after it is loaded. While windows knows an app exists, by it’s entry in the registry, consider this, it doesn’t know what it’s used for, doesn’t know about the files it uses, doesn’t know about dependencies. When you use Linux the way it’s meant to be used, things are quite different. Yast->Software_update loads the descriptions of all packages available for Linux including the files they contain and versioning, and descriptions, and where they belong under categories like graphics, games, etc… So as you browse packages you want, you can read all about them and either choose to add them or not and move on to check out other ones. Then when you have chosen all the packages you want select install and your done. No doing one at a times, No annoying reboots.

Think about it … If you delete a windows partition c: drive everything is lost! You must now recreate the C: drive and re-install all apps. Same goes for Linux. If you delete the / partition all is lost! You have to totally re-install Linux. But Linux is a professional OS if you know what you are doing, you should never need to re-install it. there are ways to upgrade Linux, fix Linux, resize Linux partitions, move Linux to new drives and much more… Done right (putting things where they belong) maintains system security, stability, and makes package handling a breeze.

hummm… ok you convinced me.
actually i use linux for a while, and i already knew about this differences, but i was not sure how it works, thanks for assistance

andre open source wrote:
> Ohh sorry, i forgot to translate this, i’m sorry.

NO problem!

> is working, but i want to know…
> In another Linux distribuition, that don’t have the sax, have any file
> that i can change to fix it (dysplay resolution), instead of programs?
> Or i have diferente ways for each Linux distribuition?

the short answer is: expect each distribution to have their own way to
set resolution…

up until VERY recently all of the settings determined by sax (or
whatever the other distros use) were stored in /etc/X11/xorg.conf (on
openSUSE…in other distros it might be in different place…)

but that is changing, rapidly…for example, a default install of
openSUSE 11.2 will not have an xorg.conf file…

however if you run sax it will generate one…so, the REASON your
resolution was not staying as you set it through a boot was because
each time you booted the new technology was NOT reading a static
xorg.conf file and was instead deciding for itself what should be
used, every boot…

ok?


palladium

ok thanks a lot!