Wireless connection speed 802.11N

Running Opensse 12.1 64 on a Lenovo SL510 laptop - dualbooting with Win7.
Recently my Linksys wireless router died so I bought a new Buffalo whr-g300n.
I replaced the terrible buffalo firmware with the latest compatible DDWRT release (pre-built for my router).

What I have noticed is that in Win7 it reports I have a 300mb connection but in Opensuse it reports I have a 150mb connection in knetworkmanager.

What might be causing Opnsuse to connect at a lower speed?
I did read somewhere that in 802.11N that channel bonding needs to be enabled to achieve the full 300mb. Is this not enabled by default in Opensuse? - or am I completely on the wrong track?

The wireless card in my computer is using the realtek driver (built into the kernel) RTL8192SE

Any other info required?

Appreciate any help.

This is the wireless card in laptop.

Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL8191SEvB Wireless LAN Controller (rev 10)

On 01/14/2012 05:46 AM, farcusnz wrote:
>
> This is the wireless card in laptop.
>
> Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL8191SEvB Wireless LAN Controller
> (rev 10)

For advertising purposes, Windows always reports the maximum capability of a
particular wireless channel. Linux reports the connection speed with the
greatest throughput. As you see, they are different. If you forced Linux to use
300 Mbps, the amount of data transmitted per second would drop due to retransmits.

can we be sure this is correct?
My previous router was a fairly horrible Linksys wrt120n.
It specs advised a max connection speed using draft N of 150mb.
In Windows it reported a 150mb connection but in Opensuse Knetwork manager it reported a 300mb connection (which was obviously wrong).

On 01/17/2012 09:26 PM, farcusnz wrote:
> can we be sure this is correct?
> My previous router was a fairly horrible Linksys wrt120n.
> It specs advised a max connection speed using draft N of 150mb.
> In Windows it reported a 150mb connection but in Opensuse Knetwork
> manager it reported a 300mb connection (which was obviously wrong).

The only test that means anything is to use netperf or iperf and measure the
throughput on TX and RX. You must, however, do those transfers to a second
computer on your local network, with the second machine connected to the router
by a wired connection. Any tests run through the Internet such as speedtest.net
will only measure the speed of your broadband connection which is a lot slower
than almost any wireless link.