windows 10 upgrade ruined my opensuse 13.2

I have upgrade windows 7 (/dev/sda4) to windows 10.
Now my opensuse 13.2 partition /dev/sda2 is changed into ntfs and I cannot boot to opensuse anymore?
My home partition is /dev/sda3 and is still ext4.

How to restore my opensuse 13.2 /dev/sda2 to multiboot with windows 10.

I thought microsoft had an agreement with Attachemate!!

Is it a question? How should we know? Show at least “fdisk -l” and “blkid” output from any Linux live image.

How to restore my opensuse 13.2 /dev/sda2 to multiboot with windows 10.

We do not even know what was on your /dev/sda2 partition. If it was openSUSE root partition and it was reformatted as NTFS, you obviously need to reinstall, what else? It may be challenging to find extra space on disk now, which returns us back to “fdisk -l” output …

/dev/sda2 should be ext4 my main partition with grub2.
I have no live cd only rescue.

Windows 7 upgrade to windows 10 is carried out of partition /dev/sda4 not sda2

I just want to restore the boot menu.

Hello anton,

if that’s really true then this

won’t help: Anything on /dev/sda2 will be gone and probably replaced with some MS Windows stuff, so no openSUSE 13.2 left to boot into.

As already proposed by arvidjaar the output of “fdisk -l” and “blkid” is needed to analyse your problem and to give you some advise. As well it might be good to know whether you are using a BIOS based or an UEFI based machine. With an UEFI based machine the question arises whether “secure boot” is enabled or not.

If your MS WIndows 10 update went OK, you should be able to download a LIVE-image. Otherwise you can use the “rescue”-option from the openSUSE 13.2 install DVD (if available).

Best regards

susejunky

Based BIOS no UEFI

lubuntu@lubuntu:~$ sudo fdisk -l

Disk /dev/loop0: 615.1 MiB, 644939776 bytes, 1259648 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk /dev/sda: 232.9 GiB, 250059350016 bytes, 488397168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x000537da

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sda1              63   4208639   4208577    2G 42 SFS
/dev/sda2  *      4208640 212396031 208187392 99.3G 42 SFS
/dev/sda3       212396032 366696447 154300416 73.6G 42 SFS
/dev/sda4       366696448 452329471  85633024 40.9G 42 SFS


lubuntu@lubuntu:~$ sudo fdisk -l

Disk /dev/loop0: 615.1 MiB, 644939776 bytes, 1259648 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk /dev/sda: 232.9 GiB, 250059350016 bytes, 488397168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x000537da

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sda1              63   4208639   4208577    2G 42 SFS
/dev/sda2  *      4208640 212396031 208187392 99.3G 42 SFS
/dev/sda3       212396032 366696447 154300416 73.6G 42 SFS
/dev/sda4       366696448 452329471  85633024 40.9G 42 SFS

Disk /dev/zram0: 987.5 MiB, 1035407360 bytes, 252785 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 4096 = 4096 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disk /dev/zram1: 987.5 MiB, 1035407360 bytes, 252785 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 4096 = 4096 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
lubuntu@lubuntu:~$ blkid
/dev/sda2: UUID="5E18A31918A2EF69" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="000537da-02"
/dev/sda3: UUID="fe4c44bc-a2ae-4657-9fc7-7bfea5b39ba0" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="000537da-03"
/dev/sda4: UUID="1438177A381759D6" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="000537da-04"
/dev/sr0: UUID="2015-04-22-12-45-07-00" LABEL="Lubuntu 15.04 amd64" TYPE="iso9660" PTUUID="6805b493" PTTYPE="dos"
lubuntu@lubuntu:~$ 


My AMi Based Bios does not have the secure boot option.
This really sucks. Fortunately I have a backup.
Back to double hard-disk like in earlier days.

I thought Win 7 required to be on the the first two partitions (sda1, sda2). Is that not the case?

BTW, my Win 7 is sda1 and sda2, and I am interested wrt future upgrading to win 10.

Less important, but why is Attachmate as previous owner relevant now?

Nope I have upgrade windows 7 (/dev/sda4) to windows 10.
sda 1 is the swap partition
sda 2 was my main ext4 linux opensuse 13.2 partition and got changed into mbr ntfs windows 10
sda 3 home/anton partition ext4
sda 4 windows 7 pro partition ntfs

sorry I missed this one “The Attachmate Group merged with Micro Focus in November 2014”

MS screws all equally.

Looks like your home partition is OK if that is what is on sda3. You root is overwritten by Windows. So you must reinstall tell the installer exactly what you want and do not proceed until the scheme screen is exactly as you want it. You need to tell the installer to use sda2 as root (/) and to formate it . You need to mount sda3 as /home and NOT format it

This of course may screw Windows 10. Do you have any idea what 10 put on the sda2 partition?

Oops. So your disk was converted to Dynamic Disk. You may be able to reinstall openSUSE, but

a) Linux can access volumes on dynamic disks but cannot change them. Means, you are stuck with current partitioning forever
b) you won’t be able to install GRUB in partition (if you intend to do it), you must install it in MBR only

If you accept it you could try to reinstall as suggested. This will likely render your Windows unusable.

I think I have seen other reports of disk being converted to LDM by Windows 10. I wonder what can be done to prevent it.

Oh yep missed that Linux can not play with any Dynamic disk partition. This will not work for dual boot and for sure you can not mount them in Linux

Thus far, I have resisted Windows 10.

Have you considered the possibility that the upgrade renumber the partitions, so that what was “/dev/sda2” is now “/dev/sda3” etc? If that’s what happened, then you need to adjust “/etc/fstab”. You might also need to get into rescue mode and run “mkinitrd”.

I can’t see a clear reason to ditch Windows 7, I see no advantage for me to do it at the moment, things could change further down the line though. I’ll just sit tight and watch what happens. Unless there is a change in policy at MS, Windows 7 will be the last Microsoft OS product I install for personal use.

And you’re not the first with tales of a disastrous 10 upgrade leaving a bad taste though.

I have tested to start from /dev/sda3 but did not work just a black screen.

Windows 7 was started and then I choose upgrade to windows 10 icon.
Did not get any destination or partition option.

greetings
Anton

.

Hello anton,

thank you for the information.

BIOS knows nothing about “secure boot”. So if you have a BIOS based machine there will be no “secure boot” option.

If “/dev/sda3” is - as you say - your /home partition, then the updated really messed up your Linux root partition. The only way i know to get it back will be a new install. But sorry, I do not use MS Windows at all. So i can’t help you on how to setup a working dual boot MS Windows / Linux.

Good luck and best regards

susejunky

Restored the disk with clonezilla and did a new win 10 install. Problem solved.

nrickert wrote:

> Have you considered the possibility that the upgrade renumber the
> partitions, so that what was “/dev/sda2” is now “/dev/sda3” etc? If
> that’s what happened, then you need to adjust “/etc/fstab”. You might
> also need to get into rescue mode and run “mkinitrd”.
>

That’s what happened to me - W10 “upgrade” from 8.1 removed some old backups
then created new partitions for its own use resulting in every partition
being renumbered. In my case, the solution was simple: boot from a live
13.1 CD and alter the appropriate fstab tables then do a clean install to a
couple of partitions I use for testing. That was simpler than fighting grub
entries as it picked up the “new” partitions when it installed its version
of grub. After that, I was able to boot all of the versions I already had
on the disk. PITA, but pretty straight forward.


Will Honea

sda 1 is the swap partition
sda 2 was my main ext4 linux opensuse 13.2 partition and got changed into mbr ntfs windows 10
sda 3 home/anton partition ext4
sda 4 windows 7 pro partition ntfs

now this makes sense

microsoft FIXED!!! the bootloader by replacing grub that was on the sda2 partition
SWAP(sda1) was never seen by Microsoft

seeing as windows MUST be the ONLY os that there is and NO ONE would ever install a second OS
The windows10 upgrade put it’s bootloader on the first fixable partition
seeing as windows saw sda2 as broken it fixed it

sorry

your suse install is FUBAR

and the next time win10 tries to “FIX” the bootloader – and it WILL
sda2 will be “fixed” again

i would repartition and but windows C drive on the FIRST partition and let microsoft HAVE THE MBR
( the only way to win the war is " NOT to play tic - tac - toe " with the WHOPPER )

install grub on the first LINUX partition

sda1 windows C and mbr
sda2- SWAP
sda3 EXTENDED
sda4 /boot - 200 to 500 meg
sda5 /
sda6 /home

Well done, so what was precisely different this time? Perhaps “did a new win 10 install” could mean you updated via Win 7 again or you did a clean install of Win 10. So, what changed this time? Others may be interested to avoid the issue. :wink: