why someone may migrate from 12.1 to 12.2?

openSUSE has a 18 months support period, during that it can get all the updates. with this support why someone may migrate from 12.1 to 12.2? when openSUSE 12.1 can get all the updates and can get latest softwar’s versions that will installed in openSUSE 12.2, why someone may migrate to newer version?

For me, hopefully the bug with Gnucash not working will be fixed in 12.2. That alone is reason enough to upgrade.

I migrated my test partition on my sandbox PC from 12.1 to 12.2 for testing. NOT for operational use.

But I think that answers your question. If one is a tester, then they would migrate their test PC to the newest test version.

Not really IMHO. IMHO that is not a good reason (apologies as I do NOT want to appear confrontational on this). You are better off sticking with 12.1 and obtaining a more up to date version of GNUcash from somewhere else … Did you look at the gnucash options here: software.opensuse.org: Search Results … and if you have a problem with gnucash you should start a new thread for help.

On 2012-02-19 08:36, ilAli wrote:
>
> openSUSE has a 18 months support period, during that it can get all the
> updates. with this support why someone may migrate from 12.1 to 12.2?
> when openSUSE 12.1 can get all the updates and can get latest softwar’s
> versions that will installed in openSUSE 12.2, why someone may migrate
> to newer version?

I see none. 12.2 is not yet finished nor released, so you can’t.

If you want to test it, you are prepared to cope with the problems, and
report on them in the proper channels, then by all means, install it, you
are very welcome for your help. But do not complain if your computer
crashes or something.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

On Sun, 19 Feb 2012 17:33:06 +0530, Carlos E. R.
<robin_listas@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

> On 2012-02-19 08:36, ilAli wrote:
>>
>> openSUSE has a 18 months support period, during that it can get all the
>> updates. with this support why someone may migrate from 12.1 to 12.2?
>> when openSUSE 12.1 can get all the updates and can get latest softwar’s
>> versions that will installed in openSUSE 12.2, why someone may migrate
>> to newer version?
>
> I see none. 12.2 is not yet finished nor released, so you can’t.
>
> If you want to test it, you are prepared to cope with the problems, and
> report on them in the proper channels, then by all means, install it, you
> are very welcome for your help. But do not complain if your computer
> crashes or something.
>

of course; pre-release versions are likely to mess up everything,
especially at such an early stage. i’ve often used milestone 5 or 6 for my
‘production’ system, but only after i saw that things were working really
well in a testing environment, like virtualbox.

support for one application, like gnucash, isn’t a reason to risk all the
rest – unless you’ve got another system in reserve, that is. if you’ve
got the HDD space, you can install oS 12.2, and go back to 12.1 if there
are problems.


phani.

I searched the forum & tried every possible fix for gnucash & it will not work properly, the report function is broken, even if you can get the program to run. It is a recognised problem in 12.1. I’m not advocating anyone install the 12.2 snapshot, my comment was directed to installing 12.2 when it is officially released, that is what I believed the OP was refering to as they mentioned openSUSE versions having an 18 month support cycle. For now I am using another distro where gnucash works.

Agreed, but as above, I was not advocating installing a pre-release. Upgrading to 12.2 when it is released in the summer, when 12.1 has months of support left, in order to re-gain the use of an application you want to use in a very good reason to upgrade IMO.

On 02/19/2012 09:16 AM, cl00t wrote:
>
> oldcpu;2441477 Wrote:
>> Not really IMHO. IMHO that is not a good reason (apologies as I do NOT
>> want to appear confrontational on this). You are better off sticking
>> with 12.1 and obtaining a more up to date version of GNUcash from
>> somewhere else … Did you look at the gnucash options here:
>> ‘software.opensuse.org: Search Results’ (http://tinyurl.com/86npza2)
>> … and if you have a problem with gnucash you should start a new thread
>> for help.
>
> I searched the forum& tried every possible fix for gnucash& it will
> not work properly, the report function is broken, even if you can get
> the program to run. It is a recognised problem in 12.1. I’m not
> advocating anyone install the 12.2 snapshot, my comment was directed to
> installing 12.2 when it is officially released, that is what I believed
> the OP was refering to as they mentioned openSUSE versions having an 18
> month support cycle. For now I am using another distro where gnucash
> works.

What is the Bugzilla number for your gnucash problems?

Searched the forum ? Good on ya for searching, but I’ll be one of the 1st to note that the forum is not all inclusive. However having typed that, I have read, on the forum (recently) of a user who is using successfully the 2.4.0-53 version (I believe from openSUSE-11.4) on openSUSE-12.1. Did you try that ? Link to a note that version 2.4.0 works on 12.1 is here: post#255 in thoughts on 12.1 thread

I note on the link software.opensuse.org: Search Results there are gnucash versions 2.4.7, 2.4.8, 2.4.9, and 2.4.10. Did you try each of those ?

New kernel may provide better hardware support
New applications may provide added features
Because we can
:slight_smile:

sorry, but i think the responders did not understand my meanning. i mean what is the benefit of openSUSE 12.2 final version vs openSUSE 12.1 that is completely updated?

1- yes but if older kernel support the hardware?
2- we can install new applications in 12.1 and we do not need to 12.2 version.
3- :sarcastic:

What is the benefit of Windows 7 versus Windows 95?

At the time point where 12.1 and 12.2 are both final (which 12.2 is not, right now), and both are still being maintained, you might get little difference between the two. But support for 12.1 will end sooner.

Also, AFAIK, new software isn’t always added back to old distro versions. For example, if a completely new version of X is included in 12.2, then it won’t necessarily be added to 12.1 (exception: security updates / bug fixes etc.).

In general, using the newest/latest distro means you get the newest/latest of all software. Using the “previous” version means you get more stable software (more bugs fixed etc., because people have been using it for longer). Enthusiasts will generally use the newest distro (now 12.1), testers even the pre-release versions (12.2). Many server and enterprise applications, or workstations in office settings or otherwise in productive use, will still be running on 11.4 today.

K.

Since we are not even close to the final version, we can’t really know the answer.

At present, testing milestone 1, I am more likely to be seeing problems than benefits. But that’s why there is testing.

it is the right answer i think, thank you.

I searched all over including the gnucash & other forums. I spent quite some time on it, installed many different versions of gnucash & eventually managed to get it to run, albeit without reports. I need reports though. I have not seen a post from someone successfully running gnucash on 12.1 & being able to run reports effectively.
I couldn’t spend any more time on it so opted to reinstall a clonezilla image of another distro & use that.
My opinion [and reason I chose to respond to this thread] is that it may be worth someone upgrading between versions [not beta] to regain the use of an application they wish to use.

It had already been reported by someone else so I didn’t make another report.

I typically will NOT follow that approach myself. Its too passive. Nor do I recommend that approach myself.

Rather I believe in open source GNU/Linux, the way to do this is to ACTIVELY participate in the milestone and beta phase of a distribution, and write bug reports and ACTIVELY track them. Also go upstream to the developers site and ensure the problem does not exist there. Maybe, also, the developer knows the solution. Don’t sit back passively and expect someone else’s bug report will address a problem.

Hence IMHO if one wants any application (and we will say gnucash for this example) working the way one wants in 12.2, one needs to install 12.2 in a test partition, and then install gnucash, test it, and either write a NEW bug report or provide input to an existing one. That IMHO is the BEST way to have this addressed. Any other approach IMHO is wishful thinking that has a good chance of NOT working.

Proactive contribution is IMHO the way to go about this in open source GNU/Linux.

If one wants to follow the passive non participating approach, then IMHO a Mac or Windows PC is the preferred route.

On 02/19/2012 02:16 PM, cl00t wrote:
>
> lwfinger;2441572 Wrote:
>>
>> What is the Bugzilla number for your gnucash problems?
>
> It had already been reported by someone else so I didn’t make another
> report.

You did not answer my question!