Why is one of my partition full (sdb6)

culpeper@linux-0etw:~> df -h
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
devtmpfs        3.9G   40K  3.9G   1% /dev
tmpfs           3.9G   88K  3.9G   1% /dev/shm
tmpfs           3.9G  4.1M  3.9G   1% /run
/dev/sdb6        20G   19G  1.6M 100% /
tmpfs           3.9G     0  3.9G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
tmpfs           3.9G  4.1M  3.9G   1% /var/run
tmpfs           3.9G  4.1M  3.9G   1% /var/lock
/dev/sdb7       284G  2.9G  281G   2% /home

I would like to fix that if possible. Thanks.

CulpeperMM wrote:
>
> Code:
> --------------------
> culpeper@linux-0etw:~> df -h
> Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
> devtmpfs 3.9G 40K 3.9G 1% /dev
> tmpfs 3.9G 88K 3.9G 1% /dev/shm
> tmpfs 3.9G 4.1M 3.9G 1% /run
> /dev/sdb6 20G 19G 1.6M 100% /
> tmpfs 3.9G 0 3.9G 0% /sys/fs/cgroup
> tmpfs 3.9G 4.1M 3.9G 1% /var/run
> tmpfs 3.9G 4.1M 3.9G 1% /var/lock
> /dev/sdb7 284G 2.9G 281G 2% /home
> --------------------
>
>
> I would like to fix that if possible. Thanks.
>
>
You may have packages/programs/applications installed on your machine?


GNOME 3.6.2
openSUSE Release 12.3 (Dartmouth) 64-bit
Kernel Linux 3.7.10-1.16-desktop

This is not always easy to explain from the fact that it is 100%. Large log files come to mind.
Look in /var/log. Old files (not written in today) can all be deleted.

For the rest, I can imagine what vazhavandan suggested. But only you can know if you installed lots and lots of software. Most people can easily live with 20GB. See mine:

boven:/var/log # df -h /dev/sda5
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda5        20G  5.3G   14G  29% /
boven:/var/log #

In the general case, a method to try to find a file (or a directory) that for some reason run out of hand is using

cd /
du -s *

and then see which one (of course skip /home because that is on another file system, likewise for other independent file systems) is to large in your opinion. Then cd to that one and repeat. Thus you may be able to drill down to the culprit.

Also check /tmp and /var/tmp. Those contain temporary files that can be safely deleted (and should be automatically every 10 resp. 30 days).

And delete all downloaded packages in /var/cache/zypper/packages/ if there are any. They are not needed anymore after they have been installed.

Yes, of course. That reminds me of the fact that the OP forgot to tell which version of openSUSE he uses (why, oh why is it it widespread disease not to tell what you have when you ask something about what you have?).

OpenSuse 12.3

culpeper@linux-0etw:/> sudo du -s *
root's password:
4708    bin
107388  boot
124     dev
23832   etc
4899848 home
219416  lib
20124   lib64
0       media
0       mnt
97864   opt
du: cannot access ‘proc/9524/task/9524/fd/4’: No such file or directory
du: cannot access ‘proc/9524/task/9524/fdinfo/4’: No such file or directory
du: cannot access ‘proc/9524/fd/4’: No such file or directory
du: cannot access ‘proc/9524/fdinfo/4’: No such file or directory
0       proc
1878252 root
du: cannot access ‘run/user/1000/gvfs’: Permission denied
4092    run
9348    sbin
0       selinux
1340    srv
0       sys
224     tmp
6733900 usr
714836  var
culpeper@linux-0etw:/> 


A small tip: specifying -h to the du command would make it slightly more readable IMHO. :wink:

Anyway, there are nearly 2GB of stuff in /root. What have you in there and why? (do you often log in as root?;))
Move that stuff over to your home directory I would say…

I would even conclude that you loged in in the GUI as root (seeing the gvfs file system).
I normaly do not even try to help people doing that :(. To many chances the system is broken.

On 08/07/2013 06:46 AM, CulpeperMM wrote:
> I would like to fix that if possible.

what kind of file system did you select for your root partition?
was it perhaps btrfs?

if it is btrfs have you tuned the snapshot thingy so it does not fill
your disk?

please show us the terminal output and input, as well as the
beginning prompt and exit prompt, from


df -hlT
sudo /sbin/fdisk -l

copy/paste the in/output back to this thread using the instructions
here: http://goo.gl/i3wnr


dd
http://tinyurl.com/DD-Caveat
http://tinyurl.com/DD-Complaints

No, according to the output he provided, he was logged in as user and called du with sudo:

culpeper@linux-0etw:/> sudo du -s *

That is not why I came to that conclusion (but I now think I am wrong). It was because you refered to the size of /root and because I saw the remark about that gvfs. But that is a misinterpretation fron my side. The gvfs is elsewhere. Sorry about that.

But your observation is still true.

/dev/sdb6 is btrfs.

culpeper@linux-0etw:~> df -hlT
Filesystem     Type      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
devtmpfs       devtmpfs  3.9G   32K  3.9G   1% /dev
tmpfs          tmpfs     3.9G   92K  3.9G   1% /dev/shm
tmpfs          tmpfs     3.9G  4.4M  3.9G   1% /run
/dev/sdb6      btrfs      20G   16G  3.0G  85% /
tmpfs          tmpfs     3.9G     0  3.9G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
tmpfs          tmpfs     3.9G  4.4M  3.9G   1% /var/lock
tmpfs          tmpfs     3.9G  4.4M  3.9G   1% /var/run
/dev/sdb7      ext4      284G  4.8G  279G   2% /home
culpeper@linux-0etw:~> 


culpeper@linux-0etw:~> sudo /sbin/fdisk -l
root's password:

Disk /dev/sda: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders, total 976773168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x440b478f

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1            2048      206847      102400    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda2   *      206848   976773119   488283136    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT

Disk /dev/sdb: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders, total 976773168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xd858d858

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1   *          63   325734002   162866970    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sdb2       325734400   976773119   325519360    f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/sdb5       325736448   329943039     2103296   82  Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sdb6       329945088   371888127    20971520   83  Linux
/dev/sdb7       371890176   976752639   302431232   83  Linux
culpeper@linux-0etw:~> 


Good guessing from DD I must say. Most of us are still not used to the fact that it exists :wink:

Over to the Btrfs gurus then.

On 08/07/2013 08:26 PM, CulpeperMM wrote:
> /dev/sdb6 btrfs 20G 16G 3.0G 85% /

yep…the claim to fame for btrfs is that it is constantly making a
backup for you (or something like that)…in so doing it just fills
up the disk with copies of what used to be…

great if you suddenly need to reestablish what worked yesterday, or
last week…

so, what you need to do is learn how to delete some old ‘snapshots’
and also how to tune your btrfs to dump old snapshots after some
period of time (you get to decide that…wanna keep a year’s worth,
or a month, or ???

sorry, i can help you learn how to do that because i’ve never used
btrfs, too new and too untested for my taste!

well, i guess i can help a little, have a read:

Documentation:
https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Adoc.opensuse.org+deleting+btrfs+snapshots

Forums:

https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Aforums.opensuse.org+deleting+btrfs+snapshots

good luck! (and ask more, maybe a btrfs guru will appear!!)


dd
http://tinyurl.com/DD-Caveat
http://tinyurl.com/DD-Complaints

On 2013-08-07 21:58, dd wrote:
> On 08/07/2013 08:26 PM, CulpeperMM wrote:
>> /dev/sdb6 btrfs 20G 16G 3.0G 85% /
>
> yep…the claim to fame for btrfs is that it is constantly making a
> backup for you (or something like that)…in so doing it just fills up
> the disk with copies of what used to be…

Right.


> http://doc.opensuse.org/documentation/html/openSUSE/opensuse-reference/cha.snapper.html

There is a good explanation there.

It is an interesting feature to be able to go back in your work, to any
saved version of any file - the problem is that I don’t trust it much :-}


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4, with Evergreen, x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

Just cleaning out .snapshot folder brought it down to 65%. Better than 85%. Okay, well, got some reading to do and then some tuning. Thanks for the help! Always much appreciated.

On 2013-08-07 22:28, Carlos E. R. wrote:

> It is an interesting feature to be able to go back in your work, to any
> saved version of any file - the problem is that I don’t trust it much :-}

Oops, mistake. Not every saved version, but only when a snapshot is
done, automatic or manually.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

hcvv wrote:
> CulpeperMM;2577549 Wrote:
>> /dev/sdb6 is btrfs.
>>
>>
> Good guessing from DD I must say. Most of us are still not used to the
> fact that it exists :wink:
>
> Over to the Btrfs gurus then.

I haven’t used btrfs either. One snippet I have picked up though is that
as well as having to manage the snapshots, you can’t trust the system
tools to report sizes correctly! So if you want to know how much data
there is in a btrfs file system, or how much space you have left, use
the btrfs-specific tools rather than the traditional tools like df or du.

I don’t know where it’s all documented but perhaps you can start at

https://btrfs.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/FAQ#Why_are_there_so_many_ways_to_check_the_amount_of_free_space.3F

Where is btrfs tools docs. I can’t even tell if it is already installed.