Which weather plasmoid do you use?

Ok, there are quite a few plasmoids to choose from. Which one do you use? I use CWD. It has the most configuration options, and works for me.

Hmmm. I always grab my iPhone when I want the weather. I need to check out the weather plasmoids.

yawp here, been working perfectly :slight_smile:

I look out of the window, I can see what the weather will be like today. I don’t generally need to know past that.

So you use the rock approach. :stuck_out_tongue:

http://blogs.orlandosentinel.com/community_apopka_blog/WindowsLiveWriter/SirensWeDontNeedNoStinkinSirens_C053/weather.rock4_1.jpg

Is CWP or CWD one of the plasmoids installed by default ?

If not where do I get it?

Sorry to say it, but that’s a tiny bit stupid. You look out the window and know what the weather will be? You assume that the weather can’t change in a few minutes, thus getting you by surprise and making you all wet when it starts to rain? This will never happen to you because “you looked outside the window”? :wink:

YaWP FTW ! :slight_smile:

Currently i’m using yaWP, because CWP doesn’t look good in the panel. But i like the amount of options in CWP.

I don’t know if it’s install by default or not, but this is where you can get it Index of /repositories/KDE:/KDE4:/Community/openSUSE_Factory

On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 11:26:01 +0000, microchip8 wrote:

> You assume that the weather can’t change in a few minutes, thus getting
> you by surprise and making you all wet when it starts to rain?

If you know where to look, you can get a pretty good idea as to what the
weather will do in the next few minutes, sure.

I took a class in meteorology when I was in college, and I was trained as
a storm spotter years ago as a part of Skywarn (as I lived in the
northern part of Tornado Alley and was an active amateur radio operator,
I felt I could help out in that way - and Skywarn early warnings have
saved thousands of lives - there’s nothing like eyes on the ground).
Short-term predictions are actually not that difficult to make IF you
know what to look for. It’s the longer-term predictions that become
difficult (difficult enough that professionals get it wrong more often
than not).

Jim

Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Moderator

How short? A few minutes, an hours? Can you tell me with absolute certainty that it won’t rain/snow/whatever in the evening, just by looking in the morning outside of the window? Better be prepared than to try figure it all by yourself, esp when someone doesn’t know a thing about how to predict weather or what to look for, unlike you :slight_smile:

btw, just yesterday, we had a wonderful sunny day, without a cloud visible in the sky no matter how far you looked at… it took only 5-10 minutes to darken the sky and start raining like hell.

On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 18:26:01 +0000, microchip8 wrote:

> hendersj;2074641 Wrote:
>> On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 11:26:01 +0000, microchip8 wrote:
>>
>> > You assume that the weather can’t change in a few minutes, thus
>> getting
>> > you by surprise and making you all wet when it starts to rain?
>>
>> If you know where to look, you can get a pretty good idea as to what
>> the
>> weather will do in the next few minutes, sure.
>>
>> I took a class in meteorology when I was in college, and I was trained
>> as
>> a storm spotter years ago as a part of Skywarn (as I lived in the
>> northern part of Tornado Alley and was an active amateur radio
>> operator,
>> I felt I could help out in that way - and Skywarn early warnings have
>> saved thousands of lives - there’s nothing like eyes on the ground).
>> Short-term predictions are actually not that difficult to make IF you
>> know what to look for. It’s the longer-term predictions that become
>> difficult (difficult enough that professionals get it wrong more often
>> than not).
>>
>> Jim
>> –
>> Jim Henderson
>> openSUSE Forums Moderator
>
> How short? A few minutes, an hours? Can you tell me with absolute
> certainty that it won’t rain/snow/whatever in the evening, just by
> looking in the morning outside of the window? Better be prepared than to
> try figure it all by yourself, esp when someone doesn’t know a thing
> about how to predict weather or what to look for, unlike you :slight_smile:

You said “a few minutes”, which is what I was addressing. Longer term
predictions are more difficult, absolutely - which I actually did
state. :wink:

Jim

Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Moderator

It can happen in a few mintues too and I’ve witnessed it myself. It also depends on where you live and how fast changing the weather is where you’re at… So “looking outside the window” and knowing what the weather will be is imo a bit silly, esp when one is going out for a few hours or the whole day (work, shopping, etc), and doesn’t know what to look for when trying to predict it. Hell, even “professionals” get it too often wrong, even when trying to predict for shorter periods

On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 18:46:02 +0000, microchip8 wrote:

> It can happen in a few mintues too and I’ve witnessed it myself. It also
> depends on where you live and how fast changing the weather is where
> you’re at… So “looking outside the window” and knowing what the
> weather will be is imo a bit silly, esp when one is going out for a few
> hours or the whole day (work, shopping, etc), and doesn’t know what to
> look for when trying to predict it. Hell, even “professionals” get it
> too often wrong, even when trying to predict for shorter periods

It can happen in a short period of time (I’ve not said it could never
happen) - I went to school in Florida, and yes, especially during the
rainy season, it can be very different.

But claiming that it’s silly to say you can predict the next few minutes
just by looking out the window is also not a complete picture, either -
it’s not so silly, and depends a lot on the locality, familiarity with
the weather patterns in the area (in Florida, during certain times of the
year, you can set your clocks to the rainstorms - I understand the same
is true in monsoon season in Arizona).

Looking outside my window right now, I see a mostly clear sky, temps
around freezing, and snow on the ground. I’d guess, based on that
current weather and the fact that the snow came in last night that it
will stay cool through the day, with a high that might get close to 40
degrees F (but that’d be pushing it). The air feels a little more humid
than usual (remember in Utah this is essentially a desert, humidity tends
to be around 10-15% at most), so we might see a little rain/snow this
evening.

Now looking at the weather report through my applet…

Today’s forecast shows partly cloudy, highs around 40. Pretty much all
it says, tonight lows near 20, also partly cloudy.

I still think we might get some precip, even though the radar is
completely clear at the moment. I was right, the humidity is up,
currently at 59% which is really high for us.

Pressure is at 30.40 inHg, which is slightly high as well, which accounts
for the clear skies (which is something I would be able to make an
educated guess about - generally, high pressure means clear skies).
Winds are calm, so there’s no front moving this way at the moment (since
winds are caused by an atmospheric pressure differential).

So as I said, you can tell quite a lot through simple observation, and
you can make educated guesses based on those observations.

Yes, professional meteorologists get it wrong more often than not (didn’t
I say that already? :wink: ). Part of the reason is that they’re looking at
a larger area, so where they might predict rain in your area may not
translate to rain at your location.

But often times (at least IME) a look out the window gives me enough of
an idea of the weather that I can know if I’m adequately prepared for the
day.

Jim

Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Moderator

Most what you said is true, but you’re also a bit of nitpicking about the “few minutes”. A few minutes ago here it was pouring rain like hell… now there’s not a single cloud in the sky and it’ll be pretty difficult to predict if it’ll stay like that in the next 5-30 minutes, or not…

so “looking out the window” won’t tell me much right now

Thanks Jonathan_R for helping me find it.

I used the Community repo that’s in the Yast repository manager.

I wish I could change my vote to CWP.

Very nice weather plasmoid.

Replaced Yawp with CWP.

On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 19:26:01 +0000, microchip8 wrote:

> Most what you said is true, but you’re also a bit of nitpicking about
> the “few minutes”. A few minutes ago here it was pouring rain like
> hell… now there’s not a single cloud in the sky and it’ll be pretty
> difficult to predict if it’ll stay like that in the next 5-30 minutes,
> or not…
>
> so “looking out the window” won’t tell me much right now

It may not tell you much, but to someone who’s trained, it’ll probably
tell them more. That’s my point: Saying “oh, it’s silly to say that
looking out the window can tell you anything” about someone else isn’t
really valid, because it depends on what they know about their local
weather.

The fact that you can’t tell what the weather will do in 5-10 minutes
because you lack the training doesn’t mean that it’s silly to say that
anyone can (or that it’s valid to say that nobody could).

I’m not sure where you’re located, but I’d be willing to bet that there’s
someone in your locality who could probably tell when the rain is coming
in - some people can feel pressure changes more readily than others (I
occasionally can because I broke my leg several years ago - and the
pressure changes are something I can feel in my leg as a result of the
surgery I had as a result of that accident).

I’m just saying that I wouldn’t be dismissive of the idea of looking out
the window as a way to tell what the weather’s doing.

Jim

Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Moderator

YASP as its easy for me to configure.