Which version is appropriate for Intel Core i7

Hi,
Previously I had an AMD 64 machine. OpenSuse X86-64 was great!
Today, I have upgraded my machine to following features:
CPU: Intel Corei7 920-2.66GHZ
MB: BioStar TPower X58
RAM: CRUCIAL-triple channel-1333 (6*2GB)
Which versions of OpenSUSE or SUSE Enterprise (Desktop/Server) is appropriate with new configuration?
Kind regards.

amirjadidi wrote:

>
> Hi,
> Previously I had an AMD 64 machine. OpenSuse X86-64 was great!
> Today, I have upgraded my machine to following features:
> CPU: Intel Corei7 920-2.66GHZ
> MB: BioStar TPower X58
> RAM: CRUCIAL-triple channel-1333 (6*2GB)
> Which versions of OpenSUSE or SUSE Enterprise (Desktop/Server) is
> appropriate with new configuration?
> Kind regards.
>
>
I don’t understand your question - you had a 64bit processor and you
happily ran a 64bit os, now you have a new 64bit processor and you’re
not sure you should run a 64bit os? Maybe you think that 12gb of ram
isn’t enough or an 17 isn’t fast enough?

Oh, wait you’re just trying to make me jealous of your new hw – and
damn it you have


Suse 11.1 x64, Kde 4.2.1, Opera 10.x weekly

The only concern I might have with the motherboard for the Intel Core i7 is that most tend to have the JMicron JMB363 SATA controller. But purportedly as of the 2.6.18.1 kernel, Linux support for that controller is OK (before then it was abysmal under Linux).

I prefer openSUSE because of the 3rd party multimedia support that is compiled/built specifically for openSUSE releases. However Novell support is only for 2 years for openSUSE releases, so you will likely be looking at updating your openSUSE every 2 to 3 years. On the other hand you can possible squeeze some more life out of SLED or SLES (in terms of Novell support) BUT you do not get the same community support for SLED or SLES (IMHO).

OpenSUSE tends to be a bit more cutting edge, … with the disadvantages and advantages, that go with that.

Pick your poison :slight_smile:

On Tue, 2009-04-21 at 19:56 +0000, amirjadidi wrote:
> Hi,
> Previously I had an AMD 64 machine. OpenSuse X86-64 was great!
> Today, I have upgraded my machine to following features:
> CPU: Intel Corei7 920-2.66GHZ
> MB: BioStar TPower X58
> RAM: CRUCIAL-triple channel-1333 (6*2GB)
> Which versions of OpenSUSE or SUSE Enterprise (Desktop/Server) is
> appropriate with new configuration?
> Kind regards.
>
>

SLES/SLED 11 as well as openSUSE 11.1 have support for it
(pretty sure).

Difference is in terms of “freshness” and support. SLES/SLED 11
is pretty fresh right now, but because of the length of support,
you may find it lacking after many years. openSUSE is fresh,
but without long term support (good for less than 2 years).

I just built a similar machine over the weekend, Core i7 920 CPU, Asus P6T motherboard, Corsair 6GB RAM (3 * 2GB), NVIDIA 9800GT video. I’ve got SLED 11 x86_64 installed on it and SLED picked up all the hardware including sound, video, and NIC.

Joe

Both should do fine, i7 support on Linux seems good no matter the distro.
I personally would use OpenSuse though because of community support as I prefer community support over commercial.

Hi All,
Greatly appreciate for useful comments. So, please update supported CPUs in the following page:
Software.openSUSE.org
I mostly wonder about motherboard compatibility. Anybody have an experiment with “BioStar TPower X58”
Share the information after I download and install OpenSUSE 11.1 x86-64.
Kind regards.

It seems that I have to replace BioStar TPower x58 with Asus P6T. Note about BioStar support team:
"Dear Customer,
This is Customer Service of Biostar. On April 22
you reported OS support for Tpower X58
there are so many different kind of Linux OS and
the chip manafacturer may not develop suitable drivers.
so we do not guarantee that Tpower X58 run on Linux OS properly.
we guarantee that Supporting Windows 2000 / XP / XP 64 / Vista / Vista 64
more detail, you could check our website
BIOSTAR
sorry for your inconvenience

Thank you that choosing Biostar motherboard.
If you have any problems, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Regards,

Biostar FAE Team"

This does not really prove anything. You can get the same or similar reply from Gigabyte or ASUS about this. Seeing that this BioStar MB uses Intel chips, there’s a good chance that it may be supported by the kernel as Intel is very active in Linux kernel development and drivers additions. There are usually no problems running Core i7 on Linux and even Phoronix have done benchmarks of this processor running Ubuntu Linux

You won’t find to many hardware vendors supporting linux.

Supporting and working are different things.

If you’re looking for that then I would think you need to be here or on the end of a phone…

At least that is my understanding of the Yes certification… for example but I’m stumbling here.

YES CERTIFIED Bulletin Search
YES Certified Program and Novell Ready Program FAQ

As a Linux community (and not just openSUSE) we probably do need to keep working on posting our success (and failure) stories with such motherboards.

I ended up putting a deposit down on an Asus P6T Deluxe motherboard (for an Intel Core i7 chipset) and part of the factors that encouraged me to select that board was it has Linux in ROM on the board (in a feature Asus call “Express Gate”, which is a version of “Splashtop” Linux). Now I plan to install openSUSE-11.1 on this motherboard (and associated new PC) , but having Asus supply the motherboard with Splashtop Linux (called “Express Gate” ) provides me a warm fuzzy feeling that the motherboard works ok with Linux. I also noted someone was kind enough to update the openSUSE HCL, noting Asus P6T Deluxe support for openSUSE-11.0. HCL/Main Boards - openSUSE

Interesting… I read about the Express Gate feature in the manual, which sounds interesting, but I didn’t realize it used Linux. The only thing, though, is that you have to have Windows on the PC to then install the software that enables Express Gate. :frowning:

At any rate, sorta changing topics, have you found anything that says what’s different with the P6T Deluxe vs the plain P6T? I looked at Asus’ website and the features looked like they were pretty much the same. You can’t find the Deluxe anymore, but instead the Deluxe v2, and it’s about $50 more so I just went with the non-Deluxe.

Joe

Yes, but take a look at its drivers page. Almost all utilities are window support!
As I can change my offer and also there are some successful experiments in the community, I prefer to buy a well-tested hardware.

I didn’t know that Windows requirement about the P6T (to activate Express Gate), but even with that, its not a factor in my decision.

What was important to me is a variant of Linux (Splashtop) functions on that motherboard. This suggests to me that accessing the Internet via the ethernet works (proving the ethernet hardware works with Linux) and the Splashtop has a feature that access’s photos and other aspects on the hard drive (proving the SATA controller works with Linux). Possibly there are power management aspects as well which benefit from Splashtop Linux being sorted by Asus as functioning on this motherboard.

Hence that is another factor that gives me confidence that the P6T will function with openSUSE Linux (in addition to the openSUSE HCL entry).

Well, it definitely works with SLED11, so I’m assuming it should work fine with openSUSE 11.1.

Joe

The P6T is not available in our local stores. I could get the P6T deluxe V2 so I ordered that.

I read some articles which noted the P6T has 1 ethernet device, vs 2 on the P6T deluxe. The P6T only supports 12GB RAM while the P6T deluxe 24GB RAM. Another noted P6T supports 12 USB vs 14 on the P6T deluxe. There are purported differences in cooling design between the boards, and a difference in at least one of the onboard chipsets. But thats from a scattering of sources and I can’t provide any real confirmation nor assessment on that.

Take a look here:
AnandTech - P6T review

*Those wondering what the differences between the P6T and P6T Deluxe can refer to this chart. The quick run down is a change from the 16+2 phase setup to an 8+2 setup that we find just as stable so far, a single Realtek Gigabit LAN controller instead of dual Marvell controllers, Marvell SAS support is dropped but the two additional SATA ports are retained via a JMicron JMB322, and on-board audio switches from the ADI AD2000B to the Realtek ALC 1200 chipset. The P6T features true dual-slot card three-way CrossFire or SLI support compared to the two-way dual-slot card support on the Deluxe board. *