Which flavor is best for me?

Which flavor of openSUSE is best for core2duo 2.13 GHz, 1 GB RAM and 256 MB graphics card computer. I am regular Windows user. Will KDE work fine for me? (I have tested gnome 3)

Also I have windows license too, can I replace native Wine files with files from Windows Installation directory?

On 2012-09-23 16:36, momin90909 wrote:
>
> Which flavor of openSUSE is best for core2duo 2.13 GHz, 1 GB RAM and 256
> MB graphics card computer. I am regular Windows user. Will KDE work fine
> for me? (I have tested gnome 3)

What is “flavor” for you? If you mean the desktop choice, like kde, gnome, xfce, etc, then
simply choose the one you like more. There is no good or bad here.

> Also I have windows license too, can I replace native Wine files with
> files from Windows Installation directory?

I guess not.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

The best thing to do would probably to install all of the DMs openSUSE offers. You can do that during installation - when shown the installation summary, before the actual installation, hit the change button, tell it you want to change the “software” and click on all desktop environments. Later on, you can then test them all and choose the one you will find best for you.

Also I have windows license too, can I replace native Wine files with files from Windows Installation directory?
Umpf, I wouldn’t if I were you - some dlls might work only with some versions of windows (and thus wine) etc… Perhaps the wine wiki can help you : FAQ - The Official Wine Wiki HTH Lenwolf

Last time I tried, the bad side of doing this is that menus (at least KDE’s) get cluttered with launchers of all other DEs, i.e., KDE menu has entries for totem, evince, etc. I find it annoying, and for a newbie it can be a bewildering inconsistent experience -> OMG linux sux let me go back to windows!

The alternative would be to try each DE in a separate partition or VM.

On 09/23/2012 06:16 PM, lenwolf wrote:
>
> The best thing to do would probably to install all of the DMs openSUSE
> offers.

that is an opinion i do not share, for a lot of reasons…*…some other
reasons brunomcl covered very well…

running each, individually, in a VM would be much better than installing
everything!

i’d suggest easiest might be for the OP download the KDE Live CD and run
it for a while…note that KDE/openSUSE will run faster once installed,
but you can get a good idea of what the interface is like by running it
straight off the CD…(you will find KDE much more “windows-like” than
gnome)

ymmv!


dd
*

I also think it is a bad idea to install multiple desktops.
You asked this: Will KDE work fine for me?
The answer is: yes (at first glance)

On 2012-09-23 19:54, dd@home.dk wrote:
> On 09/23/2012 06:16 PM, lenwolf wrote:
>>
>> The best thing to do would probably to install all of the DMs openSUSE
>> offers.
>
> that is an opinion i do not share, for a lot of reasons……some other reasons brunomcl covered very well…

I have installed and used several desktops for more than ten years without problems.
I love it :slight_smile:

I can one day start kde, another gnome, another xfce… and more. Well, yes, the menus are
mixed, but the fact is that you can run applications from one desktop in another. Yes, it would
be preferable that the menu entries said for which desktop they were designed. You people can
write a bugzilla about that :slight_smile:


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

Ok, fair enough. - I’m not bothered by having more than one choice for several types of software. I haven’t yet found a case where a, say, gnome software wouldn’t work under KDE if it was proposed in the KDE menu.

I find it annoying, and for a newbie it can be a bewildering inconsistent experience -> OMG linux sux let me go back to windows!

Sorry, I personally can’t see that happening like that…

The alternative would be to try each DE in a separate partition or VM.

Quite frankly, that’s not what I’d recommend to a “newbie”.

Lenwolf

Hi,

and

I also think it is a bad idea to install multiple desktops.

Actually, I’d like to learn more about both of your reasons (and no, I’m not trying to be polemic, just trying to understand why you think that something I believe is “good” is “not good”.).

Lenwolf*

Thanks everyone for very quick replies. Support here is very fast.