Where Is The Check Sum?

I have put 12.3 KDE on a USB stick that won’t boot. I did the md5sum and got a number. Where is that number on this site so I can check to see if the answer I got is correct? After that I’ll ask for help booting the USB if the number is correct, because it won’t boot as is.

Smallwheels

On the page where you find the download (software.opensuse.org: Download openSUSE 12.3), scroll down to
Verify your download before use

and there is md5checksum between two other check methods. Click it (with the Type of computer high up being on the correct setting 32 or 64 bit).

On Mon, 01 Jul 2013 07:26:01 GMT
Smallwheels <Smallwheels@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

>
> I have put 12.3 KDE on a USB stick that won’t boot. I did the md5sum
> and got a number. Where is that number on this site so I can check to
> see if the answer I got is correct? After that I’ll ask for help
> booting the USB if the number is correct, because it won’t boot as
> is.
>

Assuming you downloaded from the following site, you’ll find the MD5
checksum link lower down the page.
http://software.opensuse.org/123/en


Graham P Davis, Bracknell, Berks.
openSUSE 12.3 (64-bit); KDE 4.10.4; AMD Phenom II X2 550 Processor;
Kernel: 3.9.8; Video: nVidia GeForce 210 (using nouveau driver);
Sound: ATI SBx00 Azalia (Intel HDA); Wireless: BCM4306

> Where is that number on this site so I can check to see if
> the answer I got is correct?

go to http://software.opensuse.org/123/en and select the same
values as for the iso you downloaded (that is, if you downloaded a
Live KDE or Gnome, do NOT select the DVD, Rescue or etc…AND click
to select 32 or 64 bit to match what you have, and then scroll down
the page to the “Verify your download before use” section and click
on the “md5 checksum” and you should see the correct hash for your
iso, or pick from here:


c3d52c6daa68093620fcd340b04035ab  openSUSE-12.3-Addon-Lang-i586.iso
9e2e5a465b9c3d90af126f4c61161dbd  openSUSE-12.3-Addon-Lang-x86_64.iso
328daddec3984ce32812419982aa33f3
openSUSE-12.3-Addon-NonOss-BiArch-i586-x86_64.iso
97f597271a21b0877969321a3e09bc8f  openSUSE-12.3-DVD-i586.iso
02f33a86ff8e89c415f59da2618f4930  openSUSE-12.3-DVD-x86_64.iso
48425bf014f6ceb7910255d491519c54  openSUSE-12.3-GNOME-Live-i686.iso
29725b1f8308979ab248e814ee025909  openSUSE-12.3-GNOME-Live-x86_64.iso
2fb3b54715e3f3cdacd86bc0683a6db1  openSUSE-12.3-KDE-Live-i686.iso
fad87909023222943bb22cb74b9bef86  openSUSE-12.3-KDE-Live-x86_64.iso
764ae9d76de1e9813621b1606e97a41d  openSUSE-12.3-NET-i586.iso
0ef3c2f301b05f52e9c98cff3f799744  openSUSE-12.3-NET-x86_64.iso
6bb70029bb8901a769b458a46e80c48a  openSUSE-12.3-Rescue-CD-i686.iso
d9dbeba470513521e4fb867712df2474  openSUSE-12.3-Rescue-CD-x86_64.iso


dd
http://tinyurl.com/DD-Caveat

On 2013-07-01 09:26, Smallwheels wrote:
>
> I have put 12.3 KDE on a USB stick that won’t boot. I did the md5sum and
> got a number.

Notice that, depending on the method used, you can not verify the
checkum using a usb stick.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

Thank you for directing me to the right place and also displaying the numbers.

I chose KDE. The checksum is correct. Now why won’t it load from the USB stick?

I have an HP Pavillion 6100z desktop. By pressing ESC during boot it lets me select the source for the boot. The machine sees my Sandisk external drive in addition to the HDD and CD/ROM choices. I selected the Sandisk drive and the machine begins its boot, but it loads the OS on the HDD instead. What is wrong?

Before loading the Sandisk drive I thoroughly wiped it. I did the checksum on the file while it was on the desktop if that makes a difference. Then I moved it to the Sandisk drive.

To let you know what I’m doing this is my story. In 2008 my 2002 Gateway Windows XP machine was frustrating me to death. Just before it died I bought a 2008 Mac Book. I love that machine. I bought my HP in 2009 as a backup machine. It had Vista. I HATE VISTA!!! Maybe you’ve experienced it too. So I rarely used it. I put Ubuntu 10.04 on it with a dual boot but it took a year to get everything working due to not getting timely answers to questions. Thus GNU/Linux remained a hobby OS.

I have decided I want to move to Linux and keep the Mac Book as a spare computer. I’ve tried Bodhi Linux recently (successfully loaded via USB stick) but it is buggy. I want to try Trisquel 6, Ubuntu 13.04, and Open SUSE 12.3 KDE. The one I choose might have a lot to do with how quickly I can solve problems with them.

The Tumbleweed system here means I won’t need to do anything to my OS should I choose 12.3. With the others I might have to reload the OS down the road, especially since Canonical is making big changes in the future. I really don’t want to wait a year to get my new OS fully functioning.

So my next step is to just get the USB stick to load so I can run the live version for a day or two to check it out. How do I do that?

Thank you.

it is unclear how you ‘moved’ the iso to the USB stick . You can’t just do a file copy you must do a low level copy usually with dd or a program like ImageWriter

Did you follow instructions from here?
https://en.opensuse.org/Live_USB_stick

On 2013-07-01 23:06, Smallwheels wrote:
> Then I moved it to the Sandisk drive.

How? Because if just “moved” the file, it will not work.

You have instructions on that page.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

I dragged the file to the hard drive icon and the file moved.

If I begin on a GNU/Linux machine with the file saved to the desktop and the md5sum verified, how should it be moved to the USB drive?

I read a blurb about dd but I don’t know what that is and the instructions weren’t clear for somebody who has no idea how to do it. So please direct me to a clear explanation of how to do it or post it here. In the OpenSUSE documentation it said that the dd command was dangerous and could mess up a computer.

What I need is step by step instructions with the exact commands to type, not a simple statement like “You need to use the dd command.”

If I’m going to reload the drive with the OS, I need to know how to wipe the drive using GNU/Linux. I wiped it on my Mac Book the last time. I’m familiar with the OS X Disk Utility program. It is very useful. I should learn how to do it on my HP computer too. I’ll also need exact instruction with the command line since I don’t know where to find that information on the current OS.

On 2013-07-02 23:06, Smallwheels wrote:
>
> I dragged the file to the hard drive icon and the file moved.

That does not work.

You have to clone an image to the disk, not copy a file.

> If I begin on a GNU/Linux machine with the file saved to the desktop
> and the md5sum verified, how should it be moved to the USB drive?

The instructions are in that page, they are long. The third link below.

Download page
SDB:Download help
SDB:Live USB stick

> I read a blurb about dd but I don’t know what that is and the
> instructions weren’t clear for somebody who has no idea how to do it. So
> please direct me to a clear explanation of how to do it or post it here.
> In the OpenSUSE documentation it said that the dd command was dangerous
> and could mess up a computer.

But it also mentions an application to do it, ImageWriter. The
instructions are there, very detailed. I can not write them better. And
yes, of course there is danger, it is there and you have to be aware of
it - denying the danger would be lying to you.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

I’m typing this from the Live version on my USB stick. I was hoping to load three OSs to try on it but the imagewriter software only allowed one thing at a time. I did that in Bodhi Linux.

First problem was connecting to the WiFi network. I found Kinfo and it was no help. Then I noticed the icon on the bottom of the page on the right side. I clicked it and information about the area networks popped up. I clicked the one I wanted and it connected somehow WITHOUT A PASSWORD! How did it do that?

After making the connection I tried some sites. Speedtest.net needs a plug-in. Firefox couldn’t find it. I went to Youtube and couldn’t watch videos for the same reason. I wanted to see how fast the videos play. On Bodhi they drag and the audio is out of sync with the images. Can I make this work on the Live version before loading it?

So far I like it more than Bodhi. I must say that within the menu items there are many terms that are unfamiliar to me. If I choose this one it will almost be like starting over with computers.

I’ve got other questions about the OS that I’ll post in a new thread. I still need to know about the things I’ve asked here. Thanks for helping.

On 2013-07-06 10:46, Smallwheels wrote:
>
> I’m typing this from the Live version on my USB stick. I was hoping to
> load three OSs to try on it but the imagewriter software only allowed
> one thing at a time. I did that in Bodhi Linux.

Ah, good, you got it.

> First problem was connecting to the WiFi network. I found Kinfo and it
> was no help. Then I noticed the icon on the bottom of the page on the
> right side. I clicked it and information about the area networks popped
> up. I clicked the one I wanted and it connected somehow WITHOUT A
> PASSWORD! How did it do that?

Not openSUSE fault. It means that network is open without password.

> After making the connection I tried some sites. Speedtest.net needs a
> plug-in. Firefox couldn’t find it.

Nono. Tell what plugin. My guess it is flash - you don’t use firefox to
find any plugin - instead you use yast to install flash, it is in the
standard repos.

> I went to Youtube and couldn’t watch
> videos for the same reason.

flash.

> I wanted to see how fast the videos play. On
> Bodhi they drag and the audio is out of sync with the images. Can I make
> this work on the Live version before loading it?

I don’t know. I’ve never used a live that long to know.

> So far I like it more than Bodhi. I must say that within the menu items
> there are many terms that are unfamiliar to me. If I choose this one it
> will almost be like starting over with computers.

There is a saying: If you know one Linux, you know just one Linux. Ie,
although all Linux versions are all of them Linux, they are different.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)