What Video Editors And Audio Editors Are Available?

I’m new here and a beginner at Linux. I’ve had Ubuntu 10.04 on one computer and it took a year to get enough answers to get everything working. Now I’m trying a few distros. For now I’m on 12.3 Live USB.

I want to get this machine working for me so I can do real work. The work I want to do is video editing for web sites. I don’t want to make feature films. I make advertisements and sales videos for companies. For now I’m using a Mac Book. I want to switch to Linux because my Mac Book is getting older and I don’t want what Apple is selling these days. Their OS is getting filled with **** I have never used and will never use.

I found Ubuntu very intuitive, even more than OS X. My HP machine with a basic processor and an Nvidia card could play video better than the Mac Book with Intel integrated graphics. So I want to switch to a better distro.

I’ve learned that Lightworks is available in Ubuntu. It is an awesome professional video editor. Does anyone know if it works in Open SUSE? I know that Ubuntu and Open SUSE are different somehow but I’ve also heard that things can be compiled and made to work because of the build service. How about it?

What types of video editors are available for this OS? Let me know so I can research them. I know Audacity works for many OSs. Does it work here? It is a tool that is useful in creating my projects. These are vital questions for me to have answered before choosing my OS.

I’m not a code guy. Every bug I’ve had in Ubuntu was solved by others telling me what to type into the terminal. I’ve been on two other forums for other OSs trying to get assistance. I’ve still got week old questions that haven’t been answered. Without support from friendly helpful people who know their stuff I can’t use such a distro. I don’t have years or even the inclination to learn programming just to get an OS working smoothly. I’m understanding a bit more about terminal commands but it is coming slowly.

Is Open SUSE for me? I don’t know yet but I like it more than two others I’ve tried.

Thank you for your help.

Smallwheels

In general one can find many multimedia packages for openSUSE on the Packman packagers web site: PackMan :: home I recommend using the search TAB on that page.

The video editor I use (with KDE) is ‘kdenlive’. Packman packager page: PackMan :: Package details for kdenlive (ensure you pick the correct openSUSE version if you install from there). And kdenlive website page: Kdenlive | Free and open source video editor for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X and FreeBSD

There are training videos on the kdenlive site: Tutorials | Kdenlive

There is a kdenlive manual : Kdenlive/Manual - KDE UserBase Wiki

And there is a forum specific to supporting kdenlive users : http://forum.kde.org/viewforum.php?f=262

On 07/06/2013 11:36 AM, Smallwheels wrote:
> Is Open SUSE for me?

only YOU can answer…

many here say: Use what works!

and if Ubuntu works for you, why “Now I’m trying a few distros”?


dd

Audacity works fine and kdenlive is very good but probably not up to the same professional level as Lightworks, but it is free and worth a look.

As far as I know Lightworks is only available as a DEB package not an RPM, so someone would have to invest some time with the build service. It may be worthwhile asking the developers to produce an RPM version. There is pull for Linux versions from the Movie industry so it is worth pushing for.

in which case, you could grab the .deb and try converting it to an rpm with alien.

As mentioned Audacity works just fine.

Here, use google and this and start searching for:

  • OpenShot
  • avidemux
  • cinelerra
  • diva
  • LiVES
  • LVE
  • PITIVI
  • ProjectX
  • Vivia
  • CinePaint
  • Blender

That should get you started … some of them could be dead (I don’t know). There are likely others too

More info on Lightworks - EditShare the company who develop Lightworks say on their website that

Currently there is only a .deb download. Support for other versions of Linux will follow

So look out for an rpm download after beta testing has completed.

They also report that Fedora users have created an rpm presumably using alien and that it is working on Fedora systems.

More info on Lightworks

I have created a .rpm from the beta .deb using alien, but haven’t installed it as there are failed dependencies on my system and I don’t particularly want to mess with my Multimedia installation. These are the missing dependencies and I have briefly tried searching for a couple on Packman and other community and official repos without success. So if anyone wants to take this further let me know

a) where I can find the dependencies

marlin:/home/sam/convert # rpm -ivh --test lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64.rpm
error: Failed dependencies:
        libCg.so()(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libCgGL.so()(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libavcodec.so.53()(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libavcodec.so.53(LIBAVCODEC_53)(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libavformat.so.53()(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libavformat.so.53(LIBAVFORMAT_53)(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libcrypto.so.1.0.0(OPENSSL_1.0.0)(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libgsf-1.so.114()(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libmc_enc_ddp.so.7()(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libmc_enc_ddp.so.7(enc_ddp)(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libmc_enc_ddpp.so.7()(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libmc_enc_ddpp.so.7(enc_ddpp)(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libportaudio.so.2()(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libportaudiocpp.so.0()(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
        libtiff.so.4()(64bit) is needed by lightworks-11.1.H-2.x86_64
marlin:/home/sam/convert #

and b) to where do I upload the .rpm package to make it available for others? I’m still a newcomer so have no experience of uploading packages for wider use on this forum

Thank you all for this information. I’m spending my whole Saturday looking into these programs. Youtube is a really helpful place to see many of these in use.

My HP computer had Vista and Ubuntu 10.04. I hated Vista and liked Ubuntu but my version was getting old. Since I’ve wiped the drive (never to use Microsoft junk again… relief) I thought why not try some different OSs. I regularly read of peoples experiences with different distributions and their likes and opinions. Some people even make trying different ones a hobby. My only direct GNU/Linux experience was with that version of Ubuntu. It is time for me to find something directly suitable for my wants and needs.

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) had one that I want to try but I’m having difficulty getting answers to my questions there. The community at Trisquel is smaller and I suppose it just takes longer for someone who knows the solution to reply. I do believe I’ll be able to get it going this weekend.

While at the FSF I learned that the only reason Open SUSE isn’t included as a recommended distribution is because it allows non-free software into its repositories. I wish I could use all free software just to avoid those evil user license agreements and hidden malicious code. I don’t know if that will be possible yet since I need Flash. I’ve read that there are free alternatives that just don’t work as well.

I see one big benefit of Open SUSE is the new Tumbleweed program to keep the OS up to date forever without needing to start from scratch every couple of years. :slight_smile:

On 07/07/2013 01:26 AM, Smallwheels wrote:
> DenverD;2569818 Wrote:
>> >…and if Ubuntu works for you, why “Now I’m trying a few distros”?My HP computer had Vista and Ubuntu 10.04. I hated Vista and liked
> Ubuntu but my version was getting old. Since I’ve wiped the drive (never
> to use Microsoft junk again… relief) I thought why not try some
> different OSs. I regularly read of peoples experiences with different
> distributions and their likes and opinions. Some people even make trying
> different ones a hobby. My only direct GNU/Linux experience was with
> that version of Ubuntu. It is time for me to find something directly
> suitable for my wants and needs.

ok, i now i understand and would suggest this:

well, had you asked prior to wiping the drive i would have said to
keep what you know and can use (that Ubuntu) and then try others by
first running from a live CD/DVD where you might immediately ‘hate’ a
distro and can easily move on…but, if you like it then install it
in a dual boot way…so you can boot to what you know and can use
or you can boot to what you are taking a look at to see if it fits…

if the new is not ‘just right’ then dump it and try another–via live
first and then install in dual boot…

why? several reasons:

  • sometimes the live runs fine but the install is painful to not
    possible…if you REALLY love the live can work to get it going, but
    if you only think it might be ok you can decide (easily) to
    lookelsewhere…

  • you always retain a working, comfortable with system you can boot
    to if the thing being tried goes bad

  • no live is gonna exactly duplicate the actual of an install system
    (for speed if nothing else)

so, even if you have wiped the disk i’d still say to install that old
version of Ubuntu (if it is still getting security updates…don’t
know) and then do as above…

anyway, good luck on finding a great fit…i’ve been into several
different distros and settled into this back in the SUSE 9.x
days…really like it, but it is not for everyone…

and, as always: ymmv–mine is an opinion and the next one you read
may be better, for YOU.


dd

On 2013-07-07 01:26, Smallwheels wrote:

> While at the FSF I learned that the only reason Open SUSE isn’t
> included as a recommended distribution is because it allows non-free
> software into its repositories.

That is true if you wish to make it true :slight_smile:

There is a separate repository dedicated to “non free”, the standard
distro is fully free. So you can indeed consider the distribution as
free, or you can not if you wish to be more strict than strict. Saying
that openSUSE is not free… well, it is not true. The truth would be
saying that you can install non free packages if you so wish, the user
makes the decision.

> I wish I could use all free software
> just to avoid those evil user license agreements and hidden malicious
> code. I don’t know if that will be possible yet since I need Flash. I’ve
> read that there are free alternatives that just don’t work as well.

So we have the non-oss repo where not free, or not strictly free,
packages, but at least redistributable packages reside. And, external to
the distro there are alternative packages that do not heed patents or
licenses, like packman or videolan.

> I see one big benefit of Open SUSE is the new Tumbleweed program to
> keep the OS up to date forever without needing to start from scratch
> every couple of years. :slight_smile:

Well, not completely true, either :slight_smile:

Tumbleweed is always based on the current stable version. You have to
add the current repos, plus the tumbleweed repos. The “current” repos
are a link or pointer at this time to 12.3, and in some months time they
will be moved to 13.1. If you do the recommended practice of using
routinely “zypper dup”⁽¹⁾ one day you will do a sudden update of a
thousand packages.

(1) The standard distros are to be updated with zypper patch or zyper
up. The exceptions are factory and tumblewee, which have to be updated
with zypper dup. The reasons may be complex to explain.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

So I still need to learn how to do updates in addition to activating Tumbleweed. OK.

I went to the web and learned of several video and audio programs for GNU/Linux but not all of them seem to be available.
I want to try Openshot, Avidemux, Audacity, Cinelerra, and maybe Clementine.
Where do I go to find if these are available in OpenSUSE 12.3? How do I access the repositories so I can see a list of what is there?
I found Kdenlive and Pitivi. They are on my machine now.

The Kmail program seemed to fail me immediately so I got Thunderbird. It is working though I don’t think it has all of the features I like, such as magnifying the screen or enlarging the text.

A couple of weeks ago I saw a video at Youtube that showed someone looking around in a software center for 12.3. There were many icons available for each area of interest where one could just click the icon and learn about the program. If they liked it the program could be downloaded and used. Is there still such a place for me to find programs? Ubuntu has a software center with many sections full of programs. It didn’t look like the one I saw for Open SUSE in that video.

Smallwheels

these are all available from packman

go to Yast>Software Repositories>Add> Community Repositories
and select packman.
Then you will have access to all this software from within Yast - software management

btw, as you are just starting out in openSUSE I’d recommend staying away from tumbleweed. It’s really not needed. The distribution is kept up to date through the oss update repo and all packman files are kept reasonably up to date.
When a new release becomes available it is a simple update without the need to start from the beginning.

having a read through this might also answer some of your questions . . .

1. Introduction - Beginner’s Guide to openSUSE 12.3 / SUSE Linux

On 2013-07-11 05:46, Smallwheels wrote:
>
> So I still need to learn how to do updates in addition to activating
> Tumbleweed. OK.

Notice that tumbleweed is not for novices.
All that is documented on the tumbleweed portal.

> I went to the web and learned of several video and audio programs for
> GNU/Linux but not all of them seem to be available.
> I want to try Openshot, Avidemux, Audacity, Cinelerra, and maybe
> Clementine.
> Where do I go to find if these are available in OpenSUSE 12.3?

Packman or videolan (not both).

> How do I
> access the repositories so I can see a list of what is there?

I YaST package manager.

> The Kmail program seemed to fail me immediately so I got Thunderbird.
> It is working though I don’t think it has all of the features I like,
> such as magnifying the screen or enlarging the text.

[Ctrl]+] on the numeric keyboard. + or -.

> A couple of weeks ago I saw a video at Youtube that showed someone
> looking around in a software center for 12.3. There were many icons
> available for each area of interest where one could just click the icon
> and learn about the program. If they liked it the program could be
> downloaded and used. Is there still such a place for me to find
> programs?

I don’t know of such a thing.
There is the search package feature, top of the download page, but you
have to know the name of the package or program.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

You are maybe talking about Apper. This software is bundled with openSUSE when you choose a KDE desktop and gives a more user friendly way to install/update softwares but has less features than YaST/zypper, in my humble opinion. All what you can do with Apper can be done with YaST and zypper, but the reciprocal is false.

Apper can be started from the KDE kick-off menu, System Settings->Software Management if I remenber well.

farcusnz and robin_listas already gave you indications how to use YaST for installing your softwares and managing your repositories so I’ll stop my post here before repeating what has already been said.

Juste another thing (I’ll stop after, I promess ;)): don’t forget the there is fine documentation avaible for openSUSE! You should look at the Start-Up guide, part II. farcusnz also gave you a link to another (unofficial but still fine) guide.