What Tumbleweed would make better/what does not work on Tumbleweed

Hello,

I just tested openSUSE Tumbleweed again and it is great! But there are some things that I am not happy about.

1) Download Tumbleweed
The download page of openSUSE is not really clear.There is nearly no help for beginners. First of all the decision to take Tumbleweed or Leap. E.g. a “recommended” label above Tumbleweed would be great. The download page itself is even worse. There are a lot of different version to download, exactly no help for normal user which version they should take. Something like “for normal moddern pcs” above x86_64 could really help.

**2) Installation process
**Same problem during the installation process. There is no help for beginners which desktop environment they should take. Again a “recommended” above “KDE Plasma” would be great.
Auto-login is enabled by default. I know no one who uses autologin. I think it would be better to deactivate it by default.
Last but not least there is no option to set the pc name during the installation process. It would be great if this would be possible.

3) After the installation
-Welcome window: “Show on next startup” is enabled by default. It is really annoying that this shows up after every start. I think it would be better if this window only shows after the first start after the installation (so “Show on next startup” should be disabled by default).
-Setting up the pc name in the network settings is not really self-explanatory (for normal users). It would be better if this gets an extra “settings-page” in YaST.
-User aren’t added to groups automatecly (like in other distributions). For example if you install VirtualBox, your user will not be added to the group “vboxusers”. You have to do this manually. This is not really practical, new Linux users might get problems because of this.
-I got some problems by installing .rpm packages. I tried to install Google Chrome, Discover (default application for opening .rpm files) could not install it (error: “Internal Error”). YaST could install it, but also displayed an error. With “rpm-i” in the terminal I could install Google Chrome, too. But in both cases (YaST and rpm -i way) YaST displayed the message “Unknown GnuPG Key. …] Trust?” when I started the Software Management the next time. I don’t know if this was just bad luck, but installing a .rpm like Google Chrome should definitely work by default without any problems!
https://i.paste.pics/2f057ee13a60b950b9ab1c81cbc227a0.png
-After saving the first login datas in Google Chrome, I was asked to set up the password wallet. The default “for better protection” option did not work (see screenshot). SO you have to take the other “blowfish” option. If you set a password, the wallet will not be unlocked on login (so you have to enter the password everytime you start Chrome the first time after reboot). This is really annoying. It would be cool if the password wallet is installed and set up by default, so it is unlocked on login automaticly (like other distributions do).
https://i.paste.pics/a90e8b820b3585163e8163354b6545d3.png
https://i.paste.pics/091e0fbb694ca02c6e152aae6c8e0696.png
-There is a “Template” folder in the home directory. But it seams to have no function. I think this is only for the Nautilus file manager of Gnome. This folder should not be created by default if you choose KDE Plasma as desktop.

4) Language selection
I set up e.g. german as language during the installation process, but in the KDE Plasma settings there is still american englisch (but everything is in german anyways). Would be great if the language you selected during the installation process would also be set in the KDE Plasma settings.
https://i.paste.pics/5b0390c1433aec7fec8cb8144c5a35a9.png

5) Features I miss
-Backup solution: There is no backup solution by default.It would be great if there would be a default option.

This were just my thoughts how openSUSE could be more “normal-user friendly”. It would be cool to see some of this in future versions.
What are you thoughts about this? Anything to add?

https://en.opensuse.org/Portal:Tumbleweed

Which desktop environment a user prefers depends on many aspects (capabilities of hardware available, personal experience and background, personal preferences …) so i don’t think there is a “one fits all” recommendation (… and i have seen many users who prefer autologin although i don’t).

What is a “pc name”? Are you talking about “hostname”? As far as i can remember that can be set when the network gets configured (and isn’t that the proper place where a hostname should be defined?).

Again your personal preference. I saw many users closing such a window accidentally and then complaining that they did not read the content and did not know how to get access to the information again either.

Linux is a multi-user system and chances are that not all users need/are allowed to use virtualbox?!

Oh yes, security is annoying! And if your personal data is gone or there is some malware on your machine, then it is the OSs fault! I personally think it is a good practice to setup all security options and leave it to the user to deliberately disable the ones he believes he can do without. By the way, all you are looking for can be done (just search the forum/net).

Regards

susejunky

I’ll comment on only a few of your points.

Based on forum postings, many people do use autologin. Personally, I don’t use it.

Last but not least there is no option to set the pc name during the installation process. It would be great if this would be possible.

There is a section for network settings, if you click the appropriate heading. And you should be able to set the name there.

-Welcome window: “Show on next startup” is enabled by default. It is really annoying that this shows up after every start. I think it would be better if this window only shows after the first start after the installation (so “Show on next startup” should be disabled by default).

I’m inclined to disagree with you on that one.

The user can click the close button to close that window. And, if he has not changed the startup default, he can be sure that he will get another chance on the next login.

My practice on an unfamiliar distro that does the same:

  1. Take a quick look.
  2. Maybe try one of the options
  3. Close the window and continue exploring the new distro

That way, I know that I haven’t lost anything. I can logout and login again to get that welcome page back.

After a few logins, I flip the switch, so that it won’t start again on the next login.

-User aren’t added to groups automatecly (like in other distributions). For example if you install VirtualBox, your user will not be added to the group “vboxusers”. You have to do this manually. This is not really practical, new Linux users might get problems because of this.

Suppose I have three users. Which one of them should be automatically added to the “vboxusers” group?

Traditionally, that’s a decision for the system administrator.

-After saving the first login datas in Google Chrome, I was asked to set up the password wallet. The default “for better protection” option did not work (see screenshot). SO you have to take the other “blowfish” option.

As far as I know, that’s a decision by the KDE developers at “kde.org”. I think they have their own forum.

I partially agree. The “gpg” option only makes sense for people who already have some experience with using “gpg”.

If you set a password, the wallet will not be unlocked on login (so you have to enter the password everytime you start Chrome the first time after reboot). This is really annoying. It would be cool if the password wallet is installed and set up by default, so it is unlocked on login automaticly (like other distributions do).

You can take care of that, by installing “pam_kwallet”. That will work provided you use “blowfish” encryption, and take the defaults for everything else. And then use your login password as the kwallet password.

Note, however, that it probably won’t work for people using autologin. And the security will probably be weaker than using GPG encryption for kwallet.

-There is a “Template” folder in the home directory. But it seams to have no function. I think this is only for the Nautilus file manager of Gnome. This folder should not be created by default if you choose KDE Plasma as desktop.

I just leave that empty. I think it is created when you first login to KDE.

I agree it should not be enabled by default. It complicates the troubleshooting process when the initial installation’s first boot produces a black screen or unfamiliar text messages instead of a login greeter, especially on a dual graphics laptop. What’s broke? Pam? SDDM? LightDM? GDM? Gnome? KDE? XFCE? X? Wayland? Video driver? Encryption? Missing firmware?

Instead, auto-login as a suggestion could be on the welcome screen, after knowing login, X and DE are working.

I see the reasons for offering different desktops, but for normal users a help which desktop to choose would be good. I mean e.g. the server option is clear, but the KDE, Gnome and Xfce desktops have the same description. As a normal user I wouldn’t know what to do here.

And the thing with the autologin: Of course there should be an option to enable autologin, but this option shouldn’t be set by default.

To the “auto add to groups” and the password wallet: other distributions are able to handle it, so there should be a way to do this.

You should at least in detail explain what they do. Then we may, each for her/himself, decide if those distributions “are able to handle it”, or are making a mess of it. Or are you suggesting that some of us here install one or more of those distributions to test for ourselves?

As people explained, it is not even clear from a human point of view (at least my point of view) which users on a system I do not know should be chosen to be added to that group. Let alone that such a decision can be made by stupid software. There are 47 users in my /etc/passwd. When you add all, then the security that derives from being part of a group or not (and thus as a user having certain permissions or not) is gone down the drain. It would be easier to set all file access permission of the product on for the world/others instead of restricting them to the group and then adding all users to the group.

I don’t know how it works. But when I install VirtualBox on e.g. Ubuntu, I can use it directly, without adding my user to the vboxusers group manually.

And is the user added to the vboxusers group then, or is it just working without that done (and you only assuming that that particular user is added to the vboxusers group).

Without going into specific choices,
I also recognized that there are a number of relatively unsaid decisions that have to be made before, during and immediately after installation which is why I created the following slide deck for a new openSUSE Install

http://slides.com/tonysu/opensuse#/

The slide deck contains screenshots of the Installation where important decisions are made, although I don’t describe in detail everything in each page, the astute observer will note that each screenshot actually shows more than what is minimally default. And, when I do an actual presentation, I do go over nearly everything checkbox and line of each form which means that I do cover things like disabling auto-login, setting up no User or disabling the User as the Administrator account, not setting the same password for User and root, etc.

As a new User, I recommend you go through the slide deck, there is plenty there beyond just the words.
I don’t go into setting up any specific Desktop, I cover only the common openSUSE parts for every install whether it’s LEAP or TW.

TSU