What makes openSuse special?

I used openSuse for a year and a half until about 6 months ago when I switched to Arch.
I’m a member of an open source club and am giving a short talk on openSuse in a few weeks as part of a “Distro Comparison” talk because I’m the only member with openSuse experience.
The problem is, I’m not really sure what makes openSuse special other than I liked it, it uses .rpms, has pretty full repos, and has a streamlined install process.
Having not used anything but openSuse and Arch I’m not sure what to talk about.

Any ideas?

  1. YaST.
    2). The entire distribution is generally more integrated and branded than other distributions, so it seems more integrated. For example, LibreOffice branding, GIMP branding, etc
    3). Considered to be one of the best (if not THE BEST) KDE distribution out there.
    4). Build your own cloud (with 12.1) – no other mainline distro has this IIRC.
    5). Backed by a viable company – only RH, Ubuntu, Mandriva, and SuSE have this going for them.

I’m sure that other people out there will have other thoughts on this as well …

Those are a few of my thoughts … I’m sure some people out there have others.

I only want to add to the above:

  1. YaST
  2. these Forums.

Hi,

I think YaST is one of the main things, especially for new users who want a GUI to change settings (I know this probably won’t count for much with Arch users who are used to tweaking their /etc/rc.conf). Also the community is a main thing for me, OBS, Zypper is great. Good support for multiple DEs, you can choose at install time rather than being pushed into GNOME or KDE.

And as a programmer it’s important to me that 12.1 has GCC 4.6.2 so I can make use of the extra c++0x support.

I recommend you take a look at http://en.opensuse.org/Product_highlights for further information regarding benefits of the latest version of the openSUSE distro.

Oh and if you are talking to fellow Arch users, you might want to mention Tumbleweed: the newish rolling repository, and ‘one-click install’.

Hope the talk goes well.


Barry D. Nichols

In addition to the distributions “pretty full repos” including Packman, you could mention the Build Service as providing users with access to a lot of additional software, and newer releases for packages from the standard release.

Thanks guys, I think this thread is a testament to one of the great things about openSuse :wink:

I completely forgot about Yast and how great it was for me starting out.
…I never noticed the branding until you mentioned it katanacb.
I’ll have to look into the cloud, my partition is still 11.4

The group as a whole doesn’t use openSuse because Novell backs it. Mainly because of the Microsoft/Novell stuff that went down. That’s going to be brought up by the audience before I even get a chance to plug the VGA cable in.

12.1 comes with gcc! That’s great news! I always thought it was ridiculous I had to install it.
Does 12.1 default to btrfs?

Any other great thoughts?

Hi
Remember it’s Attachmate now :wink: NetIq and SuSE…

Don’t forget SuSE Studio :slight_smile:

You might want to look at this as well;
openSUSE 12.1 Review - YouTube

my two cents.
If you have been programming computers since the early 80’s, you might be able to take the default install and work it into a functioning system, if you use brand new hardware.
At least that pretty much sums up my case. I guess I have to retire the tried and true parallel printer, too bad I have 5000 sheets worth of ink that I bought at a bargain price.

FWIW

I am scared to death of 12.1, I may never upgrade!

++ the installer is slick (looking) but it doesn’t yield a stable install.
Bottom line is I got what I paid for, and only two months to get it stable.

Jeff

I never thought I would think fondly of the vista box I just replaced.
PS:no plans to own a German Car!

Am 20.11.2011 04:06, schrieb jbenetti:
>
> my two cents.
> If you have been programming computers since the early 80’s, you might
> be able to take the default install and work it into a functioning
> system, if you use brand new hardware.
I have no idea what this has to do with this thread?

But just as a side note I installed 12.1 KDE 4.7 today on a more than 6
(almost 7) year old machine without problems so far.

I would encourage you to post your comments where it belongs to, which
means in your own thread about your problems, not to a thread where a
user asks for special features of the distro.


PC: oS 11.4 (dual boot 12.1) 64 bit | Intel Core i7-2600@3.40GHz | KDE
4.6.0 | GeForce GT 420 | 16GB Ram
Eee PC 1201n: oS 11.4 64 bit | Intel Atom 330@1.60GHz | KDE 4.7.3 |
nVidia ION | 3GB Ram

Mandriva’s MCC, which is also used in PCLinuxOS and Mageia is the equal. YaST has some advantages, as do they.

2). The entire distribution is generally more integrated and branded than other distributions, so it seems more integrated. For example, LibreOffice branding, GIMP branding, etc

I used to consider Suse the standard for the look and feel. I no longer do. Suse used to have this commercial product feel to it that many distros lack. It still has it, though to a lesser degree. I can’t put my finger on it, but it just isn’t quite as good as it once was, in this regard. I now consider Linux Mint to be the standard.

3). Considered to be one of the best (if not THE BEST) KDE distribution out there.

Subjective. PCLinuxOS has a really good distro and Mageia is on its way. You can forget the once heralded Mandriva. I think it’s on its way out. Kubuntu is a complete afterthought, and Linux Mint KDE (or KMint) is no longer even developed.

4). Build your own cloud (with 12.1) – no other mainline distro has this IIRC.

Excellent point.

5). Backed by a viable company – only RH, Ubuntu, Mandriva, and SuSE have this going for them.

Well, Mandriva is going the way of the dinosaur if things don’t do a drastic turnaround. The latest release is not making the loyal followers happy. Also, Ubuntu has never made a single $1 US in profit, and as far as I’ve read, still costing Shuttleworth money. I think it’s a matter of time before he finally figures out that his commercial venture isn’t paying off and closing the doors. It’s difficult to be a commercial venture in Linux and make money. Novell and RH pretty much had the entire market sewed up on the commercial end. Ubuntu is facing a serious uphill challenge.

That said, do you seriously think Debian is going anywhere? What about Gentoo? Some other distros may rely on their creator, but that doesn’t mean much. If they disappear, just start using a different distro.

One thing I’ve always admired about openSuse was that Novell was very creative and gave back to the Linux community. They’ve developed in-house projects such as Mono and spearheaded development of projects such as Xgl, which led to Compiz.

Thanks everyone.
I think I’m going to hit 1) Yast 2) SuseStudio 3) The Forums.
I’m 1/21 distros tonight, this should be interesting.