What iso do I choose?

Sorry for this very stupid question but I am confused.

I am swapping from Kubuntu to OpenSuse and am confused.

I want the KDE one on my notebook so I just install the KDE live one to my hard drive?

What is on the 4.7Gb DVD why is it so big?

Thanks

On Tue, 15 May 2012 15:56:02 +0530, Jfreed12
<Jfreed12@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

>
> Sorry for this very stupid question but I am confused.
>
> I am swapping from Kubuntu to OpenSuse and am confused.

i assume you want the latest stable version, 12.1? if not, there may be
other choices better than what i’m going to propose.

> I want the KDE one on my notebook so I just install the KDE live one to
> my hard drive?

that’s the fastest way to get to a working system, with the KDE desktop
environment.

> What is on the 4.7Gb DVD why is it so big?
>

the DVD includes a lot more software, including other destop environments.

the trouble using the DVD (or even KDE liveCD) is that after installing,
you’ll find that many of the packages have updates, in effect you’ll
download once the CD/DVD, and then most of the packages again, when
updating your new installation.

in general i prefer the net.iso’s. these are only a couple hundred MB in
size, but require a reasonably fast network connection during intallation.
i have lousy & unreliable internet, and frequently found that i got stuck
with the net.iso, so i had to download a liveCD instead.

the answer to your question therefore depends on your circumstances: if
you have a reliable internet connection, i’d go with the net install .iso.
it allows you to customize your installation after the initial download of
the package manager and other necessary things. using the KDE liveCD, you
can’t choose which software you want to install during installation; you
gotta take what’s on the CD. (of course, you can change things to your
heart’s content afterwards.)


phani.

On 2012-05-15 12:26, Jfreed12 wrote:

> I want the KDE one on my notebook so I just install the KDE live one to
> my hard drive?

Yes. Just choose 32/64 bits. You boot the CD, try it out, then install it.

> What is on the 4.7Gb DVD why is it so big?

KDE, Gnome, and others. No test live system to try it out. It can also
“upgrade” a system, but it is not your case.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Thank you both for your answers. Very detailed, and helped me choose.

I picked the net install, as I have fast Internet and this will be good to have the up to date packages. Thanks again.

If you’re going to update KDE to KDE 4.8.3 anyway, you might want to use the option to add the repo for the KDE 48 packages during install. The installer will then install the KDE packages from that repo straight away, saves all the updating immediately after install.

On 2012-05-15 23:16, Knurpht wrote:
>
> If you’re going to update KDE to KDE 4.8.3 anyway, you might want to use
> the option to add the repo for the KDE 48 packages during install. The
> installer will then install the KDE packages from that repo straight
> away, saves all the updating immediately after install.

I’m more conservative. I prefer to install the default things, get the
system running as soon as possible, then update from the running system. I
consider the installation phase as something critical that should be soon
over, as soon as possible.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Carlos, on my production machines, ditto. Until recently. Over the last couple of weeks I did at least 10 installs like this, i.e. adding the KDE (and Kernel:stable) repo’s during a NET install. Now i’m wondering why I never tried this before. I end up with exactly the same result as from the “conservative” way (install, update), i.e. same list of packages installed. Creating a LiveCD with SUSE Studio basically works the same, the KDE Reloaded CD’s serve packages the same way as per manual intervention of the installer by adding repos. So, why not. Works fine for me, not afraid to use this on production machines.

On Wed, 16 May 2012 03:26:02 +0530, Knurpht
<Knurpht@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

> Carlos, on my production machines, ditto. Until recently. Over the last
> couple of weeks I did at least 10 installs like this, i.e. adding the
> KDE (and Kernel:stable) repo’s during a NET install. Now i’m wondering
> why I never tried this before. I end up with exactly the same result as
> from the “conservative” way (install, update), i.e. same list of
> packages installed. Creating a LiveCD with SUSE Studio basically works
> the same, the KDE Reloaded CD’s serve packages the same way as per
> manual intervention of the installer by adding repos. So, why not. Works
> fine for me, not afraid to use this on production machines.

wow, thanks for the info. i was tempted to do that during my last install
(12.2), but since i wasn’t sure what would happen, if this would go smooth
or things get confused, i chickened out and did it the long way: install
first one, then the other. if it works for you, chances are good that
it’ll work for me, too. (hopefully that won’t change before my next
planned install, ard. 12.3.)


phani.

On 2012-05-15 23:56, Knurpht wrote:

> manual intervention of the installer by adding repos. So, why not. Works
> fine for me, not afraid to use this on production machines.

Good to know. Perhaps I have been unlucky when I tried. :slight_smile:


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

On 05/15/2012 11:16 PM, Knurpht wrote:
>
> If you’re going to update KDE to KDE 4.8.3 anyway, you might want to use
> the option to add the repo for the KDE 48 packages during install. The
> installer will then install the KDE packages from that repo straight
> away, saves all the updating immediately after install.

interesting!

is that an option in the install GUI?

or do you drop to zypper to add the repo? oh, do you change the priority
of the 48 repo, or??


dd

On 2012-05-16 08:34, dd@home.dk wrote:
> is that an option in the install GUI?

Yep.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)