What is that **** button that hides all my windows in KDE ??

I have had this experience when I press the combo of:

<window key> + <tab> that my windows goes missing into the land of the la-la. I don’t really know where they went and usually have to restart my browser of my konsole session which is really irritating. Googling for kde key combo does not tell me much. Anyone have any idea what this combination of keys actually do and better yet how do I reverse it’s effect ?

Press <window key>+<tab> again (maybe a few times)?

<window key>+<tab> switches to the next activity. Each activity has its own set of applications/windows, the task manager only shows those by default (it can be configured to show all though regardless of the activity).
You can right-click on a window’s titlebar to move a window to a specific activity, or to have it show up in all activitites.

Press <window key>+<Q> or click on the 3 dots in the panel to open the “Activity Manager”. You can directly switch to any activity there. You probably want to switch back to “Desktop” to get all your windows back.
And you can stop activities there by clicking on the “stop” button, so you don’t switch to them by mistake any more. (you could even delete them if you want)

On 2014-12-03, lowks <lowks@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:
>
> I have had this experience when I press the combo of:
>
><window key> + <tab> that my windows goes missing into the land of the
> la-la. I don’t really know where they went and usually have to restart
> my browser of my konsole session which is really irritating. Googling
> for kde key combo does not tell me much. Anyone have any idea what this
> combination of keys actually do and better yet how do I reverse it’s
> effect ?
>

First of all, the *** button and Meta-tab shorcut (it’s only the Windows' key in Windows) are _very_ good things in KDE, and if you don't like them, you should consider switching DE, because the Activities’ facility is something that
makes KDE unique, and in my opinion better than any other DE. For a demystification of Activities see
http://www.datamation.com/open-source/the-mystery-of-kde-activities-1.html .

However, if you insist on using KDE without using one its core functionalities, you only need to stop' all your other activies. This is done by pressing Meta-Q’, and pressing the `stop’ sign (black square) on all the non-Desktop
Activities leaving you with the facility to switch DE screens only with Virtual Desktops (if you have more than one
active, which I imagine you don’t).

Thanks people for all the insightful answers!

???

Just because you like and use it, does not mean that everyone should “or else leave”.

I use KDE my own way, which actually does not involve “Activities” very often, either. And, I am not leaving, because I like it.:stuck_out_tongue:

Cant you also do something very KDE like, change keybindings? “Configure Desktop”, “Shortcuts and Gestures” - see under “Global Keyboard Shortcuts”, and as component pick “Plasma Desktop Shell”. Away it goes or does something else.

KDE reminds me of this old saying:
A user interface is like a joke: If you have to explain it, it’s not that good.

demystifying is not better. May be a lazy user came up with that one liner? Could be, but also food for thought for some developers.

Does not matter that much with KDE since all or most stones in shoe can be removed by OWNING options. If something is stupid disable or change it. Offering a way out is best KDE core feature.

The Rise of Plasma Activities and What it can do for You – Between Linux and Anime This 2011 article and even more the comments explain why activities feature is work of the devil or must-have. Die hard KDE fans argue :slight_smile:

Dont get me wrong. I am hardcore KDE supporter and fan. I really love KDE SC more than GNOME. But so far no one, No one has not could tell why Activities are better than virtual desktops or how they would resolve problems easier and better way than what virtual desktops could ever do.

Is so opinion based it hurts but really more of a settings issue I think. True no one is forced to use them but there is no big “DISABLE” button which remove “activities” term 100% from interface. It is in Power Management! = hard coded in to KDE. Of course it is or it would not work but might send bad vibes to people who dislike concept and to those who like simpler DEs but is now trying KDE because hmm “features”. Not the same as they accept “the more the better” mentality.

Not possible to make everyone happy but I would love a “disable entirely” button.

Well when first introduced activities really did not work well. However they seem to work well today. So here is a general usage scenario.

Say you are a person that has several different jobs, say 4. Now each job is complex and may take up one or more virtual desktops to work efficiently each VD pointing to a different directory. But the directories and the application may be different for job 1 2 3 and 4. So for each job you set up the VDs to work for that job and save it as an activity. Now you can move from job to job via the meta-tab keys. Now probably not a lot of people need that level of abstraction but it is nice if you do need it. So don’t think of it as an aggravation think of it as a super feature.

I have always used Virtual Desktops for different activities and use the mouse wheel to scroll through them. I have the Pager on the Task Manager bar, which provides a quick visual cue of what’s going on (Configure Desktop -> Workspace Behavior -> Virtural Desktops). I tried KDE Activities, but it was a little overkill and less efficient for me. There are a lot of features in KDE, and the great thing is, for the most part, the user can customize the desktop for efficiency, performance, and enjoyment.
Article at ghacks.net on KDE Pager.

As far as keyboard shortcuts go, checkout: Configure Desktop -> Shortcuts and Gestures.

A few versions back, I turned off the startup of power manager (in “Startup and Shutdown”). I discovered that this also disabled activities, though that was not why I disabled the startup.

On 2014-12-04, Fraser Bell <Fraser_Bell@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:
> Just because you like and use it, does not mean that everyone should “or
> else leave”.

No. I did not say that. Please don’t put words into my mouth. I said the OP should consider switching' - with no reference to leave’. Give proper consideration to my use of the word `consider’.

On 2014-12-04, Fraser Bell Fraser_Bell@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org wrote:

I use KDE my own way, which actually does not involve “Activities” very often, either. And, I am not leaving, because
I like it.:stuck_out_tongue:

I am not suggesting you or anyone else should. No. I was empathising on behalf the OP. Look at the evidence. The OP was
not clear what the ***' icon did, was not familiar with Activities’, and found the default Alt-Meta' action really
irritating’. During openSUSE installation, there is a choice between KDE and GNOME (and others…). Since one of the key
distinguishing features of KDE is Activities', I wasn't sure that the OP made a fully informed decisision. I'm not even the sure the OP is confident he/she made a fully informed decision! If it were possible to find desktop settings that was less irritating’ to the OP, then I was merely suggesting that the OP does not exclude an alternative DE as a viable
solution. If you felt threatened by this suggestion, then I am sorry.

To be fair to the OP, KDE doesn’t do anyone any favours with it’s marketting and documentation, or rather lack thereof.
I sympathise for the OP that a Google search for KDE Activities tutorial' yields nothing particularly useful from kde.org and that's why I posted the datamotion link. Yes, of course it's perfectly possible to use KDE without Activities, but I'm not convinced you can replace possible’ with `optimal’ in this sentence. One thing I am sure
however is that it’s not something worth having a religious war over.