What is really vista?

Well guys: today i decided to inspect the c:\ drive! No don’t you think it is the first time i run vista. I use it for trivial reasons like usb sniffing. My os is Unix in any flavour. So i have been very suprised when i saw those directories like \boot and \users. It seems to me like the osx structure and so Unix. Adding that vista ultimate was claimed as be able to run Unix sw(which os and which sw), i an asking to myself: is it really windows or something else? Are they (don’t want to write their copyrighted name) switching to something different?

I think if they really wanted to emulate Unix, they would use the regular slash “/” for directories instead of the backward slash “”. I never understood why they use \ instead of /. \ is backwards. That always confused me. Now that I use Linux instead, it makes a bit more sense. / is used in websites, too.

Windows has had a POSIX compatibility layer since NT. It can run unix sw. I’ve never bothered trying, but they do have a unix service layer or some such thing that you can download. (And hey, they even licensed from SCO and all… :wink: )

It’s Windows. No, they’re not “stealing” BSD or linux or anything like that. They’ve even replaced the TCP stack they used from BSD in previous versions.

Hope this helps…

Cheers,
KV

\ is backwards
:smiley:
Yeah. I was thinking that too.

Only trouble is; Some of us have to know all about it because of work. That really sucks.

According to my Chambers dictionary, vista is ‘a view or prospect … a mental view or vision extending far into the past or future …’

So nothing to do with the present, then?

(And hey, they even licensed from SCO and all… :wink: )

Yuck! That’s creepy and just wrong! Like something you’d beat with a hockey stick!

john hudson wrote:

>
> According to my Chambers dictionary, vista is ‘a view or prospect … a
> mental view or vision extending far into the past or future …’
>
> So nothing to do with the present, then?
>
>

I read recently that Vista is Lithuanian for ‘Chicken’.

Microsoft Chicken!! Now with Aero!!


L R Nix
lornix@lornix.com

You got to bet the Novell lawyers had fun with that one!

For anyone that’s interested there’s a large add-on called SFU (Services For Unix). Details available here:
Windows Services for UNIX. This was originally developed by a Microsoft partner, the name escapes me, back in the days of NT4, and was eventually bought by Microsoft at some point. It used to cost money but has been a free download for some years now.

Also see Introduction to Microsoft Windows Services for UNIX 3.5

What is Vista? Vista is proprietary software that has malicious features. The malicious features include spying on its users, Digital Restrictions Management, Microsoft’s ability to send out updates without users’ consent, and probable keys and/or backdoors for the NSA/US government.

Sad thing is, the judge decided that SCO was allowed to keep the money they received from MS, because the Novell portion of the IP wasn’t clearly enough delineated from SCO’s actual IP. SCO would be dead by now if they had to turn over that revenue.

The most amusing irony though, albeit somewhat unrelated, is that Sun released openSolaris based, in part, on copyright that has now been determined to belong to Novell, and that they paid SCO for. Technically, lacking an agreement with Novell directly, Sun has violated Novell’s copyrights by releasing openSolaris. Who’s Sun’s daddy now…? :wink:

I only say it’s amusing because of the irony, I can’t see Novell pulling a Microsoft-move and trying to derail openSolaris. Frankly, I’d be disappointed if they did. I’m cynical about Sun’s motives and intents, but I’ve always applauded them for opening Solaris, even if I’m not likely to use it.

Still, it’s delicious. Sun threw money at SCO prior to their embrace-OSS strategy, in a feeble attempt to undermine linux by strengthening SCO’s claim. And now Novell p0wns them. :wink:

Cheers,
KV

RichardStallman wrote:
> What is Vista? Vista is proprietary software that has malicious
> features. The malicious features include spying on its users, Digital
> Restrictions Management, Microsoft’s ability to send out updates
> without users’ consent, and probable keys and/or backdoors for the
> NSA/US government.
>
>
Any proof for points 1 or 4?