well well guess which company is looking old and tired?

Amid layoffs, Microsofties reveal further turmoil in Redmond

And the posts from insiders in the blog linked to in the article are also fascinating reading.

On Fri, 09 Jul 2010 02:46:01 +0000, ken yap wrote:

> ‘Amid layoffs, Microsofties reveal further turmoil in Redmond’
> (http://blog.seattlepi.com/microsoft/archives/213808.asp)
>
> And the posts from insiders in the blog linked to in the article are
> also fascinating reading.

Having been through layoffs myself (and even on the RIF list once, though
I got rehired the same day), I hope those who are being laid off land on
their feet.

Not saying that you’re taking any joy in the MS layoff, Ken, but it’s
important for everyone to remember that when something like this happens,
it’s the “little guy” who’s affected, generally not those who make a
company’s policy.

Jim

Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator

Maybe Microsoft needs to try and hire Steve Jobs! :wink:

Of course, none of these people talking smack are disgruntled employees, right?

Being from Seattle, it isn’t good news, but Ken’s main point (in the subject line) is on track. MS has never been very innovative, and as things change, they are just chasing the real movers now. In recent years they’ve been shortsighted and they’re becoming less relevant. They can’t milk Windows and Office much longer.

On Fri, 09 Jul 2010 04:06:01 +0000, dragonbite wrote:

> Maybe Microsoft needs to try and hire Steve Jobs! :wink:

Heh…no comment. :wink:

> Of course, none of these people talking smack are disgruntled employees,
> right?

I’m sure most of them are - but that’s different than what I’ve seen some
do (not here, but in other places) by expressing anything less than
understanding at those who have been laid off from their jobs (no matter
what company, I might add).

IOW, it’s one thing to be upset at the policies of a company; quite
another to take pleasure in seeing people getting laid off - whether it’s
Novell (ie, my employer), Microsoft, or even SCO for that matter. I have
friends who work at Microsoft, and colleagues who are former Santa Cruz
Operation (though not any of the successor company) employees.

I take no pleasure in seeing people losing their jobs because of poor
management decisions. (It’s a bit different, of course, if they’re the
ones who made the bad decisions - unfortunately in most RIFs, the bad
decision makers usually are not the ones who are affected).

All I’m sayin’ is let’s keep some perspective and show respect and
compassion to the guys and gals in the trenches who are affected at
Microsoft by bad management decisions. And I’m saying it now rather
than waiting until someone comes in here and starts it (not saying anyone
is going to, I sincerely hope nobody thinks that’s appropriate behaviour).

Jim

Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator

On Fri, 09 Jul 2010 04:56:01 +0000, chief sealth wrote:

> hendersj;2186382 Wrote:
>> Not saying that you’re taking any joy in the MS layoff, Ken, but it’s
>> important for everyone to remember that when something like this
>> happens, it’s the “little guy” who’s affected, generally not those who
>> make a company’s policy.
>
> Being from Seattle, it isn’t good news, but Ken’s main point (in the
> subject line) is on track. MS has never been very innovative, and as
> things change, they are just chasing the real movers now. In recent
> years they’ve been shortsighted and they’re becoming less relevant. They
> can’t milk Windows and Office much longer.

No disagreement there, I just didn’t (and don’t) want to see anyone
rejoicing in others’ misfortune, that’s all - and I didn’t think Ken was.

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator

No no, that would be politically incorrect of course. :wink:

This is about M$, not the workers. The workers have spoken volumes in the blog.

Jim Henderson wrote:

> IOW, it’s one thing to be upset at the policies of a company; quite
> another to take pleasure in seeing people getting laid off -

[Caution: alliteration & massively mixed metaphors crossing]

agree, but there is one thing you seem to overlook: the illegal
monopolistic business practices and buy/borrow/mimic others ideas
while calling same ‘innovation’ has been around since the early '90s,
at least…so anyone with less than (say) 15 or 20 years in the
company made a conscious decision to hitch their wagon to that team…

then, that the mules have been getting older and weaker for a very
long time is a fact only an ostrich could have missed…

so, yes those “guys and gals in the trenches” who have hung onto the
gravy train will now have to face the music…and, it is not my job
to have either joy (that they have a new opportunity), or sadness for
them…

i believe they have been very well paid and very mismanaged…

and they have known that for a very long time–as is evidenced by
numerous blogs and leaks…

the smart ones have already gone on to better conditions in better
managed and visioned arenas…the ones in the trenches now are not
the swiftest…

no matter how much we need more Contributors i’d recommend the
Community not recruit from the rolls of late jumping Redmond Gravy
Train Riders…

ymmv–my views do not reflect those of any organization i’ve ever been
associated with (but i smile as i note that even the DoD gravy is
drying up, late but long expected…)


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DenverD
CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD [posted via NNTP w/openSUSE 10.3]

On Fri, 09 Jul 2010 08:13:12 +0000, DenverD wrote:

> agree, but there is one thing you seem to overlook: the illegal
> monopolistic business practices and buy/borrow/mimic others ideas while
> calling same ‘innovation’ has been around since the early '90s, at
> least…so anyone with less than (say) 15 or 20 years in the company
> made a conscious decision to hitch their wagon to that team…

Nope, I’m not overlooking the company’s behaviour at all. I’m addressing
a different issue, which is that of forum members prospectively rejoicing
at people being laid off. That ain’t cool, and I don’t want to see
anyone here acting that way.

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator

On Fri, 09 Jul 2010 07:16:01 +0000, ken yap wrote:

> hendersj;2186382 Wrote:
>> Not saying that you’re taking any joy in the MS layoff
>
> No no, that would be politically incorrect of course. :wink:

It isn’t even really about being politically correct - it just simply
ain’t cool to take pleasure in people “in the trenches” being laid off.
They don’t set policy, they’re expected to follow it.

Having had friends laid off (and as I mentioned before, having been on
the list once myself), it’s a terrible thing to go through because of
others’ decisions. You feel like you have absolutely no control over
your life.

> This is about M$, not the workers. The workers have spoken volumes in
> the blog.

Yes, and I hope they do continue to speak out.

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator

Absolutely correct, with the addition of …“Or the overpaid pompous parasites that were sucking its *** till it was dry.”

Mate, you’re just too earnest. I’m just stirring you. :stuck_out_tongue:

On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 01:16:01 +0000, ken yap wrote:

> hendersj;2186816 Wrote:
>> people “in the trenches” being laid off. They don’t set policy, they’re
>> expected to follow it.
>
> Mate, you’re just too earnest. I’m just stirring you. :stuck_out_tongue:

Yeah, I know - but having been unemployed in the past and a part of a RIF
more recently (it’s been probably 6 years now, though), it’s perhaps a
touchy subject. I saw people during the last MS layoff who were just a
little too pleased about it - that’s all. :slight_smile:

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator

As is evident by “allowing” limited free versions of office for cloud use. As another Seattleite, it would be a serious blow to the local economy. I’m retired so woudn’t have much effect on me personally but the current jobless level would go through the roof. Not only the actual MS employees but all the contract and ancillary people would be hurt. I don’t agree with their way of doing business and feel it is up to us to try and change the publics mind about using their software.

Tom

David Rushkoff said it: We’ve turned the world into a large corporation, let’s get it back.

IMHO it’s becoming more and more evident, that the future is not for the giant molochs. Communities have proven to be more effective, more productive, more flexible. Apple already found out, M$ missed the boat.