VNC connection problem

On one machine I have OpenSuSE 11.4 and the other is Windows 7. From OpenSuSE I can connect to the Windows 7 machine running Tight VNC using KDRC and no problems. But I get a message of ‘Failed to connect to server (192.168.1.1)’ when I go from the Windows machine to the OpenSuSE machine.

ON the OpenSuSE machine, the firewall has VNC and VNC Sercver allowed in the firewall.
In the Remote Administration, ‘Allow Remote Administration’ is checked and Open port in firewall is also checked.

Why can I not connect?

Also, how do I set what the password is on the OpenSuSE machine?

Thanks!

You’ll find these lines in the file /etc/hosts:

# special IPv6 addresses
::1 localhost ipv6-localhost ipv6-loopback 

Comment the second line with a hash (#) and VNC should work. You should then get a 1024x768 login screen on port 5901 (address xxx.yyy.zzz.aaa:1). If you want a different sized screen, go to Yast → network services → xinetd and you’ll find three options in the list where you can switch to a different resolution. This method doesn’t require setting of a password because the login screen takes care of the password issue.

Do you actually have a vnc server running on the opensuse machine?

Haven’t used vnc in a long time as I prefer nx but I’m guessing that by ‘Allow Remote Administration’ is checked and Open port in firewall is also checked’ you mean the vnc module in yast rather than having installed something like x11vnc right?

You don’t mention what you’re using to try connecting from windows but I believe using the yast module you can connect from another machine using a link like this in a web browser: http://192.168.1.1:5901, vnc clients like realvnc typically use 5900 as the default port so if you’re using one you might have to change the port number

A quick google also revealed that ipv6 can interfere if enabled when using the yast vnc module

Correction to my post above:

I tried just now to toggle the other resolutions on in the xinetd GUI and I can’t get it to work at any resolution beyond 1024x768. If you also have this problem, you might have to use the other method, using TightVNC, as described here: TightVNC on openSUSE as Client or Server (Remote Desktop Connections)

It’s weird that this problem has been allowed to stand since openSUSE 10.3; that’s about 3 1/2 years since TightVNC worked properly on openSUSE.

Just outta curiosity, what do you (plan to) use vnc for?

While I have the two machines in front of me, this is to test things out. The third machine is located close by but don’t feel like running up and down the stairs. My goal is to get VNC working on that third machine. The third machine has a user session already running and want to control that session.

I tried the ip address but this time added a “:1” after it and got a KDE login screen. I signed on OK and saw the desktop. When I tried to logout I received a notification that KDE had crashed. After clocking on “close the application”, VNC ended.

Later I tried with a “:0” to try and get to the screen/keyboard/mouse of the session that was already running and with this I received: “Failed to connect to server (192.168.1.1)”.

I did comment out that line that you mentioned and yet to reboot and try it. However, just as an FYI, Going through YAST, and then into Network Settings, and then in Global Settings, I have Enable IPv6 unchecked. This is to allow my network to run faster.

For local usage then, that running user session you wanna control, do you physically sit at that machine and use the session or are you only planning on using it remotely

Do you have the vnc connection actually working now?

VNC was already installed, or ensured it was through software management. I would say you were right.

Haven’t heard of nx before. I have seen this software called “Synergy” which is supposed to do something like VNC.

From Windows I am using TightVNC as both a client and server.

Just tried going through Firefox (browser) running on Windows to the Linux machine and using in the URL “http://192.168.1.1:5901” and received back a message of “RFB 003.007”. Thought it would be interesting to try and possibly use later on to see if I could get to the Linux machine through a browser.

The machine that is remote, normally I start things up while at the machine but later on want to control it via VNC. It would be nice if I could either 1) be at the machine and start things up and use VNC to remotely control it. 2) Let the remote machine come up, connect to it via VNC, get things running, disconnect from it, reconnect to it later on just like I left it.

I do have a VNC connection running but can only connect to it to a new KDE session and not one that is already in progress.

Try http://192.168.1.1:5900

Looks like vnc on port 5900 connects to a running session while 5901 starts a new session, not sure if yast’s module works that way but worth a try

You may have to open 5900 in the firewall advanced section

Just for interest though, nx can work pretty much as you want and the connection is usually quicker over nx than vnc. Also the machine you’re remoting into doesn’t even have to be running a desktop environment, sessions are saved under your users home directory and I believe you can log back into a session even after a machine has been rebooted

Well, I’m working on getting spacifically the port 5900 opened up. Will know how that works out by morning.

As for the nx program, I take it that it is unavailable for use on a windows machine? If not, that may cause problems. Of course there is the Netop software, but that costs…

You might find interesting the GUI in Yast – network services – xinetd

That will tell you what ports are available on what resolutions (for this version of tightvnc infrastructure)

nomachine’s nx client will run on windows, but you can’t run an nx server on windows

I see that ports 5901 - 5903 is available with the resolution. Still, would like to be able to access the current user of the remote system.

Oldcpu uses a vnc setup that allows the same window open on the client and the server, see post #3 here: VNC usage