Usless Gnome Desktop

I just installed the newest version of SUSE… 12.1 or something like that, and found that not only is KDE now a pain in the butt, but Gnome, which is the past has been an excellent desktop not kluged up with cutsy garbage, no longer is a useful desktop. By no longer useful, I mean that I can’t put anything on it except open applications and windows. I no longer am allowed to drag files to it and use it as the center of my activities. Not only that, but there are no longer any responses to right clicks in the desktop, nor can I place applications or files on the top or bottom of the screen, or create my own side bars and drop downs and such. This “new and improved” desktop is a huge liability, and has taken away much of the user’s control.
I absolutely hate this “new improved” interface. I’ve been committed to Linux, primarily SUSE for quite a few years now. It remains my primary OS. At this point I am planning to revert to an earlier version of SUSE to get away from this GARBAGE… “Improvement” seems to be an euphemism for taking things away from us, and making things cutsy / nonfunctional!!! I currently am using the old version on my old standby / reliable computer, and have not brought the new system on line.

  Suggestions appreciated...............

Try XFCE. Lots of people don’t like Gnome 3, though others think it is great.

Thanks… I’ll try it. I’ve used Windowmaker and ICE, but not installed XFCE. I will also look at weather I can live with KDE. KDE used to have the option of going to the “traditional” desktop… I suppose that is no longer an option. I abandoned KDE when they started doing the transparency thing and hanging the silly little popup sidebars on everything on the desktop. These guys need to look at their “improvements” and assess weather they really “improve” anything. Every upgrade to almost any software removes user options and control, and tends to enforce a particular methodology on the user, rather than empowering the user and putting him in control. I have long contended that software needs to be subservient to the user, not the other way around!
Howard

You can also try LXDE.

Or install cinnamon from the GNOME:Cinnamon repository. It runs on top on Gnome3 and gives it a more traditionnal look and feel. If it doesn’t work for you, read this thread: http://forums.opensuse.org/english/get-technical-help-here/applications/473418-cinnamon-1-4-0-available.html

And now we also have RazorQt, very slck, very fast.

On 2012-04-02 16:16, Owly wrote:
> Suggestions appreciated…

I would not have used your words, but… I can’t use that G3.
Anyway, try XFCE, it looks like gnome did.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Cinnamon is probably the best desktop option for folks who like the Gnome2 desktop.

One question: is that so difficult to install gnome-tweak-tool (software.opensuse.org: Search Results) and dconf-editor (software.opensuse.org: Search Results?) You can tweak Gnome3 in less than 2 minutes and make it behave as you wish: desktop icons, drag and drop, side bars etc. Personally I love the “magic corner” and I think Gnome3 is great: fast, stable (never had a crash) and user-friendly…IF you have installed the two additional tools and played with them. I don’t think it’s a big deal to do that.

On 2012-04-03 09:16, riderplus wrote:
> One question: is that so difficult to install gnome-tweak-tool
> (‘software.opensuse.org: Search Results’ (http://tinyurl.com/6ojb4rf))
> and dconf-editor (‘software.opensuse.org: Search Results’
> (http://tinyurl.com/72h2ror) You can tweak Gnome3 in less than 2 minutes
> and make it behave as you wish: desktop icons, drag and drop, side bars
> etc.

I can not tweak it to behave as I like. I want 4*3 workspaces, in rows and
columns. I want a traditional menu. I want my weather applets on the top,
and my application list. I want the bar with the running apps listed below,
only of the apps in this workspace.

There is no “behave traditionally” switch. No, the failsafe mode is not it
either. It is better, but not it.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Gnome3 in fallback mode can do all you want, except for a couple missing applets. It is based on GTK3 and uses metacity.

http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg14/scaled.php?server=14&filename=gnomefallback.jpg&res=crop](ImageShack - Best place for all of your image hosting and image sharing needs)

Mate (screenshot belowm from Mint) behaves exactly like Gnome2 - based on GTK2. I don’t know if @ketheriel is still working on a repo for openSUSE.

http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg19/scaled.php?server=19&filename=matemint.jpg&res=crop](ImageShack - Best place for all of your image hosting and image sharing needs)

Cinnamon runs on top of Gnome3. It uses clutter and GTK3. You can have a fixed number of workspaces (unlike in Gnome-shell) but in a single row. I haven’t seen a weather applet. Some of the Gnome-shell extensions are working.

http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg88/scaled.php?server=88&filename=cinnamons.jpg&res=crop](ImageShack - Best place for all of your image hosting and image sharing needs)

In Mate and fallback, you can have the menus you like if you write your own menu file (I explained how in other posts). In Cinnamon, you can use the same menus but submenus are collapsed, because gnome-shell doesn’t support submenus.

On 2012-04-03 15:56, please try again wrote:

> Gnome3 in fallback mode can do all you want, except for a couple
> missing applets. It is based on GTK3 and uses metacity.

It can not do 4 columns by 3 rows workspaces. It only does workspaces in
vertical. I asked. That’s final for me.

XFCE can do it all out of the box, except the weather applet.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Wrong! And btw did you look at my screenshot?

The number of workspaces is stored in the metacity general properties (just like it was in Gnome2). It can be read or written with gconftool-2, using GUI gconf-editor or in the applet preferences in fallback mode.


$ gconftool-2 --get /apps/metacity/general/num_workspaces
9

The number of rows is stored in ~/.config/dconf/user. The most unacceptable thing in Gnome3 is that this file is a binary file (I suspect those guys learned programming on Windows - but in any case, it is absurd. ) You can change it using GUI dconf-editor (not to be confused with gconf-editor), by right clicking on the applet in fallback mode or with dconf on the command line.


$ dconf read /org/gnome/gnome-panel/layout/objects/workspace-switcher/instance-config/num-rows
3

9 workspaces in 3 rows makes 3 columns (3x3)

Whom did you ask?

Thanks please_try_again. Some info I had been planning to find out about when having some spare time. No need for spare time anymore :smiley:

On 2012-04-03 19:26, please try again wrote:
>
> robin_listas;2453366 Wrote:

>> It can not do 4 columns by 3 rows workspaces. It only does workspaces
>> in vertical.
>>
>
> Wrong! And btw did you look at my screenshot?

I did, later, and I was surprised.

> The number of workspaces is stored in the metacity general properties
> (just like it was in Gnome2). It can be read or write with gconftool-2,
> using GUI gconf-editor or in the applet preferences in fallback mode.

I must be getting older, I forget things. I just started my 12.1 in
VMplayer, and I see I already have two rows of desktops by two columns.
Ctrl-up-arrow works, but left-right do not. Maybe vmplayer interference.

I’m interested to see that you moved the clock to the right, I can’t.

A curious thing is that when the screensaver jumps in, the top panel
remains lighted, the entire screen does not go to sleep.

What did you use to print all those status information on the right hand? I
use gkrelm, which is much more compact. I have seen in kde, but not gnome :-?

It appears you have opened the menu entry applications/main. I don’t have
that one. I have a menu with entries like “Internet”, but inside it is
flat, there are no submenus like email or browsers. This is important, xfce
has it. I think you mentioned it.

I opened xterm in one workspace, and orage in another. Both applications
show simultaneously in the application bar - this is wrong, I have dozens
of opened applications in my 12 workspaces. It will not do, all of them
mixed in the same bar.

> robin_listas;2453366 Wrote:
>>
>> I asked. That’s final for me.

> Whom did you ask?

In these forums, time ago. Maybe Jim. :-?

But I forget things I do not use often, obviously some one told me how to
get multiple workspaces and I forgot again. :frowning:

I have been using 12.1 and xfce on another machine for about two weeks, I
felt comfortable, things were as I expected and where I expected. Gnome
fallback is close to it, but…


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Hi
Browse https://extensions.gnome.org there is one to move the clock and
many others that would assist to further cusomize.


Cheers Malcolm °¿° (Linux Counter #276890)
SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 11 (x86_64) Kernel 3.0.13-0.27-default
up 1 day 21:34, 2 users, load average: 0.06, 0.07, 0.06
CPU Intel i5 CPU M520@2.40GHz | Intel Arrandale GPU

If you logged in in gnome-shell, it reset the number of workspaces to 2 (gnome-shell’s default) while keeping the number of rows. It’s possibly a bug. I use this workaround in xinitrc and/or Xsession if the command starting the session is “gnome-session --session=gnome-fallback”.

dbus-launch --sh-syntax --exit-with-session gconftool-2 --type=int --set /apps/metacity/general/num_workspaces 9

That way I always have 3x3 at Gnome (fallback) start. Don’t say “Mmmm…” again! (http://forums.opensuse.org/english/get-technical-help-here/applications/467995-whatever-happened-gnome-panel-opensuse-12-1-a-3.html#post2450562)

Alt-right click (might not work in vmware) and move the clock or

dconf write /org/gnome/gnome-panel/layout/objects/clock/pack-type "'"end"'"
  • double quote + single quote + double quote.

Or use dconf-editor on that path.

I don’t know. I disable gnome-screensaver and use xscreensaver instead.

I use conky in all desktops, including Gnome, KDE, Xfce, etc. The configuration is written by conkyconf (available in my repo).
http://forums.opensuse.org/english/get-technical-help-here/how-faq-forums/unreviewed-how-faq/464737-easy-configuring-conky-conkyconf.html

Nobody has these menus. I don’t use any of the default menu layouts in /etc/xdg/menus/ but write my own menu file and my own categories. Thus I changed the path in XDG_CONFIG_DIRS for the menu and XDG_DATA_DIRS for the desktop files. If you use the distro’s menus (like most people do), it might be necesserary to change XDG_MENU_PREFIX to an empty string to use /etc/xdg/menus/applications.menu instead of the new (since 11.4, I guess) default /etc/xdg/menus/gnome-applications.menu to get submenus in gnome-fallback. Look in /etc/xdg/menus if you’re interested in the differences between Gnome and Xfce menu layout.

Check “Show windows from current workspace” instead of the default “Show windows from all workspaces” in the Window list Preferences.

or …

  • find out the name of the window list applet:
$ dconf list /org/gnome/gnome-panel/layout/objects/  
clock/
menu-bar/
notification-area/
object-0/
user-menu/
workspace-switcher/

It will be different for you. It’s called “object-0” here because I just added it for this example. I normally don’t set up a bottom panel and don’t use the Window list myself.

  • then set display-all-workspaces to false:
$ dconf write /org/gnome/gnome-panel/layout/objects/object-0/instance-config/display-all-workspaces false

I have the opposite problem. I remember what I explained to whom … and often get the impression that people don’t listen or don’t care. lol!

On 2012-04-04 00:48, malcolmlewis wrote:
> Browse https://extensions.gnome.org there is one to move the clock and
> many others that would assist to further cusomize.

Ow.

And will the current extensions work with a gnome that was released several
months ago? I heard not.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

LXDE or Cinamon might be worth looking into.

Best regards,
Greg

Mate if it pisses you off enough, get off your arse, stop winging and install gnome2. This is Gnu/Linux buddy, and it’s (mostly) about freedom. In kde you go back to traditional icons by creating the appropriate desktop activity. Here’s a pic of my screen i took just for you.
http://i39.tinypic.com/34xf4m1.png

I’ve xfce4.8, gnome2.32, kde4.7 soon to be kde4.8 on my asparagus system.