Using YAST as default to install rpm downloads

On 04/27/2011 07:06 PM, ajohnw wrote:
>
> Curious thing now I’m back with 64bit 11.4 there is an option to install
> rpm’s with yast.

nothing at all curious about it…

already told you that you either had a bad install, or it was damaged
somehow after the install…


CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
[openSUSE 11.3 + KDE4.5.5 + Thunderbird3.1.8 via NNTP]
HACK Everything → http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5b4CCe9pS8&NR=1

Nope It just wasn’t there on 32bit. No idea why not either and no point in guessing. There was nothing odd about the install either other than it lost my email where as going back to 64bit kept it…

John

On 04/27/2011 09:36 PM, ajohnw wrote:
>
> Nope It just wasn’t there on 32bit. No idea why not either and no point
> in guessing.

you are not listening John, and i’m not guessing: it should have been
there…it IS there on my 32 and everyone elses…the fact that it was
not on yours indicates either you had a faulty install or an after
install damaged system.

> There was nothing odd about the install either other than
> it lost my email where as going back to 64bit kept it…

where was your mail on the system that was replaced?


CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
[openSUSE 11.3 + KDE4.5.5 + Thunderbird3.1.8 via NNTP]
HACK Everything → http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5b4CCe9pS8&NR=1

In kmail. Mostly imports and a few fresh mails that didn’t matter. I just had to import again.

On 2011-04-27 21:36, ajohnw wrote:
>
> Nope It just wasn’t there on 32bit. No idea why not either and no point
> in guessing. There was nothing odd about the install either other than
> it lost my email where as going back to 64bit kept it…

As DenverD says, bad install on your side, or it was damaged later.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” at Telcontar)

On 04/27/2011 11:06 PM, ajohnw wrote:
>
> In kmail. Mostly imports and a few fresh mails that didn’t matter. I
> just had to import again.

you may have not told the installer to preserve an existing /home…that
would wipe out all mail…

if that is what happened it was not an openSUSE problem, but instead a
user problem…


CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
[openSUSE 11.3 + KDE4.5.5 + Thunderbird3.1.8 via NNTP]
HACK Everything → http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5b4CCe9pS8&NR=1

Ever version of suse that I have installed leave home alone providing the partition isn’t changed and the user pass words are kept same.

So as I said 64bit to 32bit lost emails. This could be a file access difference. 32bit to 64bit kept them.

I think I will take a tip from you too Denver, yawn. I need a nap and have rather a lot to do and am in a hurry.

One thing I will add. This forum is somewhat better than last time I used it.

I have only made this post to see if the others come back.

Sorry to the fun guys, but I have the same problem with 32-bit version on my new laptop computer. I have 64-bit version installed on my home desktop computer and there’s no problem there. I too want to use gui to manage my packages. Here’s how to fix the problem:

  1. Right-click on any rpm file in Dolphin (probably works the same in any file manager) and choose Properties.
  2. Click on a wrench icon next to the ‘Type: RPM package’
  3. Move the ‘Install/Remove Software’ entry to the top or simply delete the KPackageSomething entry.
  4. Edit the ‘Install/Remove Software’ entry.
  5. Click on the Application tab.
  6. Change the command to yast2 -i %F
  7. Click on Advanced Options button.
  8. Check the ‘Run as a different user’ checkbox and type root as the username.
  9. Click on ok in all open dialogs to save the settings.

That’s it. All rpm files should now open in YaST as in other versions of OpenSUSE.

Perhaps this is not so automated, but what I have been doing a long time to install rpm’s with yast is:

  1. Create a folder for RPMs. I named mine RPMs (duh)
  2. In Yast repo manager, ad the rpm folder as a repo.
  3. Start yast software manager, the rpms will show on search or repo list.

I have a bunch of stactic rpms (without dependencies or with very simple ones) like kpdftools and gsview that I use this way since 11.1 or so. Still work in 11.4.

On 06/03/2011 12:06 PM, brunomcl wrote:
>
> Perhaps this is not so automated, but what I have been doing a long time
> to install rpm’s with yast is:
>
> 1. Create a folder for RPMs. I named mine RPMs (duh)
> 2. In Yast repo manager, ad the rpm folder as a repo.
> 3. Start yast software manager, the rpms will show on search or repo
> list.

all good, but if it is just one package you wanna download, then do that
and right click on it and go “Open With” > “Install Remove Software”
give password when asked and YaST pops open . . .

fini


dd CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
[NNTP via openSUSE 11.4 [2.6.37.6-0.5] + KDE 4.6.0 + Thunderbird 3.1.10]
Dual booting with Sluggish Loser7 on Acer Aspire One D255

Yes, that’s what I did at first. Then I noticed that I had all these rpms around on different folders, or not anymore, and started archiving all in the same folder. Then to configure this folder as a repo in Yast was a very small (and satisfactory) step, as these rpm become part of the package database, and are considered when yast checks versions, dependencies and such. This is specially true with proprietary packages like bricscad or ares commander, or discontinued (but functional) ones.

For example, ATM I have the following packages, not all installed:

Bricscad-V11.3.3-1-en_US.rpm
Bricscad-V11.3.5-1-en_US.rpm
Bricscad-V11.3.8-1-en_US.rpm
BricscadClassic-V11.1.13-1-en_US.rpm
BricscadClassic-V11.1.17-1-en_US.rpm
BricscadClassic-V11.1.19-1-en_US.rpm
DraftSight.rpm
SpiderOak-9807-1.x86_64.rpm
WorldOfGooDemo.1.41.rpm
atari+±1.52-1.3.x86_64.rpm
atari800-2.0.3-2.3.x86_64.rpm
autokey-common-0.71.3-13.1.noarch.rpm
autokey-gtk-0.71.3-13.1.noarch.rpm
autokey-qt-0.71.3-13.1.noarch.rpm
cups-pdf-2.5.0-2.1.x86_64.rpm
gsview-4.9-11.3.x86_64.rpm
kpdftool-0.22-10.2.x86_64.rpm

On 06/04/2011 10:06 AM, brunomcl wrote:
>
> Yes, that’s what I did at first. Then I noticed that I had all these
> rpms around on different folders

agree with all you say, which is why i prefaced my offering with: “if it
is just one package you wanna download”

which directly answered the thread starter, and is a potential remedy
for those who piled in later…


dd CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
[NNTP via openSUSE 11.4 [2.6.37.6-0.5] + KDE 4.6.0 + Thunderbird 3.1.10]
Dual booting with Sluggish Loser7 on Acer Aspire One D255

On 2011-06-04 10:06, brunomcl wrote:
>
> Yes, that’s what I did at first. Then I noticed that I had all these
> rpms around on different folders, or not anymore, and started archiving
> all in the same folder. Then to configure this folder as a repo in Yast
> was a very small (and satisfactory) step, as these rpm become part of
> the package database,

The rpm database is independent of how you install rpms. It is updated when
whatever you use to install something calls the command “rpm” in the end.

You mean the “live” database yast uses comparing all the rpms, deps and
such. It is not a real database, it is created again each time the yast
package manager or zypper starts

It is an interesting idea, having those rpms in the same place, and add it
as a repo.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Me too; I don’t, however, organise a separate folder for this, but use my general ‘downloads’ folder, and let Yast sort out which are the appropriate files. It is quite happy to filter the .rpms from the other stuff that might be there, and I wouldn’t download an .rpm file if I thought it presented a danger.

(Incidentally, I’ve fallen into the same trap as many other in this thread; Yast exists as both a GUI app, and a curses, ancient-command-line-graphical-app style. So there is always a danger of having to say ‘which Yast’, when someone says ‘I don’t like command line’ because they may or may not like the non-GUI Yast.)

Anyway, if you do go down the ‘download an rpm route’, be aware that this means that you take responsibility for watching for updates and keeping your system secure. Given that Opera has an inbuilt notification when you start up if a more recent version has been detected, it probably isn’t a big issue in this case, but for many apps there is concern that you miss out on critical security updates.

In the case of Opera, there are usually versions from people’s personal repos that are reasonably up-to-date, but I can’t see a reason for preferring this to getting it directly from the official Opera website. If you take the opposite view, currently one of the ‘prusnak’ repos has a reasonably up-to-date version and that would be satisfactory for you.

The one thing that I do not think is advisable is to run an ancient version that has known serious vulns. This is not a matter of ‘wouldn’t it be cool to have the latest and greatest features’ but avoiding known and exploitable security vulnerabilities.

To the OP

Opening rpms with Yast’s installer can be set simply in System Settings, but once you are in the relevant screen for doing that you are also able to view the relevant lines/parms to add to a .desktop file

Not sure why you would want to make a .desktop file for Yast package manager when there’s already one on the menu which can be added to the desktop with a right-click (and copied to anywhere else from there should you want to), but here’s how to find the info using System Settings

Open System Settings > File Associations

Type rpm in the search box

Expand Applications and click on x-rpm

In the right-hand pane you can then use the Move Up button to put Install/Remove Software at the top of the list making it the default

To look at the entries needed for a .desktop file, select Install/Remove Software and click the Edit button

In the Edit screen scroll across to the preview tab, this preview shows the information you would need to enter into your .desktop file, as for icon, that’s one of the parameters

(also, opening your existing .desktop files in kwrite is a simple way to look at what sort of instuctions & parameters you can use in them)

Hope that’s of use to ya