Upgrade destroys Installation

Anyone upgrading should be very careful to check that enough space is available on the partitions involved in the upgrade. After upgrading successfully via zypper dub a couple of times, I assumed that my 52 Gb oSUSE Gnome Root Partition had plenty of space. It didn’t. (That’s one of the disadvantages of btrfs and it’s snapshots).

I downloaded all the files first and was midway through installing almost 4500 files when disk space ran out and had to abort the upgrade. Now it won’t boot. I made flash drives for the Rescue, Net Install and DVD iso’s but they wouldn’t load. Then I burned CD’s and a DVD and they wouldn’t either.

So I tried re-installing 13.1 but couldn’t do that either.

On the positive side, my new openSUSE xfce upgrade went very well on the laptop and I have my data in a separate partition (and back up to another drive) and other OS’s are installed on this desktop machine, so I’m not in desperate shape.

But if there’s a way to recover from this debacle (which wasn’t openSUSE’s fault - the upgrade was moving along perfectly), I’ll give it a try.

Any suggestions?

On 2014-12-08 02:46, d hinds wrote:
>
> Anyone upgrading should be very careful to check that enough space is
> available on the partitions involved in the upgrade.

Yes, this is known. I reported it in a bugzilla more than a decade ago :slight_smile:
And zypper dup doesn’t check.

> Now it won’t boot. I made flash drives for the Rescue, Net Install and
> DVD iso’s but they wouldn’t load. Then I burned CD’s and a DVD and they
> wouldn’t either.

That is not related at all to the failed upgrade. That you can not boot
from the images you download and place on a usb stick or dvd, is not
related at all to your upgrade failing.

> So I tried re-installing 13.1 but couldn’t do that either.

Same thing, unrelated.

Maybe you have some other hardware issue.

> But if there’s a way to recover from this debacle (which wasn’t
> openSUSE’s fault - the upgrade was moving along perfectly), I’ll give it
> a try.

Yes, but you have to be able to boot from a dvd or usb stick. Basically
you need the full 4.7 dvd, boot, and choose upgrade.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

openSUSE is installed on all my computers. Backing up (or Remastering) another working installation could allow me to replace my broken openSUSE installation (the / partition of which is now 90 Gb) with a similar selection of software.

The openSUSE 13.2 iso’s aren’t the only ones that won’t load on this Gigabyte X58A-UD7 based machine, which has had a working version of openSUSE installed for quite a while. And since I had upgraded 12.3 to 13.1 via zypper dup, no install media was required.

A usb flash with Salix 14.1 loaded fine but wouldn’t connect to the Internet. Manjaro xfce 0.8.11.0 wouldn’t load. But the latest stage of Calculate Linux Desktop xfce loaded, installed and is working perfectly at the moment, although I had to upgrade it’s system-kernel with a still unstable one. There’s no graphical package manager but I am getting the hang of Portage.

Now this sounds even more like it is a hardware issue. Failing Memory Module, perhaps? Overheating?

The computer was built in July of 2010 w/ a MB that had one of the first implementations of usb3 and there have been issues with the BIOS, with a number of hardware related problems like not being able to see the display on recovering from suspend, and some distros (or versions of those distros) install well and others won’t, but NO distro can complete only half of a full upgrade without breaking.

I consider openSUSE to be the best of the stable, highly configurable mainstream GNU/Linux OS’s and by posting this I was hoping to determine the best way to enter the / partition (maybe chrooting?) and recover or reinstall the system.

For example, would using Yast2’s backup on a working openSUSE system installation from another machine with a similar CPU allow me to reinstall my openSuSE OS on this one?

Sparky Linux (which I also use, with OpenBox) has a system remastering tool that has been useful for installing the full system (including configurations and email accounts) to another machine. Does openSUSE have a similar tool installed available? Con YAST2’s backup app perform a full system backup and be reinstalled elsewhere?

Thanks in advance.

Perhaps you could put the DVD install ISO for the version you are moving to on one of your partitions, then run the ISO directly from there and choose the Upgrade option?

It’s already there.

I’m not sure how to do that. I doubt that clicking on it would be enough.

And I don’t have another openSUSE installation on this computer. I think I would have to be inside it - maybe chrooting - or running it in a virtual environment. I am hoping to recover the existing configuration. which may be too much to expect.

Sometimes you can’t upgrade and so you wait for the next version. But this one broke my installation so I will probably have to start over, whenever I can.

Hmm.

You need to make changes to Grub. Perhaps you can set up a Grub on a USB stick to launch the ISO from the HD.

But, I would think that if you can do that, you should just be able to install from a USB installer.

I need to think about this.

… I am assuming that you do not have any backups made, so cannot restore from them.

When you say:

The openSUSE 13.2 iso’s aren’t the only ones that won’t load …

does it not even start to load?

Or, does it stall somewhere during the loading process?

What exactly does it do?

This has happened to me about a month ago, running out of space on a 34GB root partition with Btrfs, while upgrading with zypper dup from old Tumbleweed (13.1 based) > standard 13.2 > new Tumbleweed. The first step completed ok, but snapshots reduced the space so that second upgrade failed with only a few hundred packages to go. Basically my snapper cleanup config was retaining too many “timeline” snapshots to cope with increasingly larger Pre-Post snapshots resulting from two big upgrades.

Although Grub2 belonged to the unbootable Btrfs system being upgraded, it was on a separate /boot partition using ext2. I could therefore boot another openSUSE 13.1 system on a separate partition which I used to chroot into the failed partition. I then used chroot to run snapper delete commands to remove many older snapshots. Since the downloaded package upgrades were retained in zypper’s cache, running zypper dup again picked up from where it left off.

Actually zypper dup gave up again nearer the finish, as I hadn’t freed up enough space. After deleting more snapshots and restarting zypper dup, the upgraded completed successfully. That upgrade method is quite robust, thanks to its download cache. The hard part was getting the right mounts and binds for chroot and its use of snapper. :wink:

I’ve tried the Rescue, Net Install and DVD isos on both optical disks and usb flash drives.

As I recall the Net Install disk offers both Rescue and Install options and has gotten farther into the process but what happens is it finally reboots the computer.

I can also boot into the partition (openSuse took over the Grub and it’s Plymouth screen appears) and it tries to load the system before running into a mortal error, and stopping - it says it’s going to reboot, but doesn’t. It gets stuck.

Since this occurred on my main desktop machine and the only other OS I was using (Sparky Ultra Openbox) is getting old (it’s 3.2 and the current version is 3.5 with 3.6 due out any day) and I haven’t updated it because doing so on other machines caused problems, I installed what I’m using at the moment: Calculate Linux Desktop Xfce (it’s an overlay of Gentoo) over the weekend and I’m in the middle of some things I have to finish.

The usb drives did better if I used SUSE Studio Image Writer (using a laptop computer with 3 working openSUSE installations on it) than with unetbootin and I erased the two smaller images (which aren’t big enough for the 4.7 Gb DVD image) but can reinstall them if needed.

I attempted to back up the laptop’s openSUSE xfce installation this morning but it’s been installing files not linked to packages all day long (it’s the snapshots - another btrfs problem).

When I get a chance I’ll try to do a rescue installation and take note of what happens. Thanks for taking an interest in resolving this situation. (To be continued).

Try again with USB drives.

First, try the install DVD.

dd the ISO to the device, not a partition on the device. That is, target sdX, not sdX1 or sdX2.

# umount /dev/sdX
# dd if=/path/to/downloaded.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=4M

See if that works (should, from the hints you give).

unetbootln does not work with these images.

And, from the SDB:

How to make a USB drive bootable

This situation would happen very rarely, but in the even that your computer doesn’t boot from the LiveUSB/DVD from the steps above, you might try the following procedure.

Open a console and do the following as root:

# umount /dev/sdX
# fdisk /dev/sdX
: p   «--- print partition table
: a   «--- activate partition (bootable)
: 1   «--- apply to partition 1
: w   «--- write changes and exit

That is very encouraging and is in line with the way I conceived that the problem could be resolved. I once used a Manjaro installation mounted on a usb flash drive to chroot into an existing Manjaro installation and reinstall it’s Grub. But I did that following instructions that may not apply to openSUSE (although both -unlike Debian- use the same file system layout), but I will search the openSUSE literature and try to find something suitable.

My two openSYSE partitions are on sda9 (/) and sda10 (/home). What binds did you use for yours?

If you are booting with an openSUSE live CD or DVD, make certain it is the same version as installed. You can also do this from the install DVD by choosing “Rescue System”

mount /dev/sda9 /mnt

Then

chroot /mnt
mount -t proc proc /proc
mount -t sysfs sysfs /sys

Ooops, left out a step, the bind::shame:

After you mount device sda9, and before you chroot:

To mount the other devices do:

mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev

We could have arrived here quicker, but it was not clear that you could boot with a Live openSUSE device, at least to me.

On 2014-12-09 03:26, d hinds wrote:
>
> Fraser_Bell;2681651 Wrote:
>> When you say:
>>
>> does it not even start to load?
>>
>> Or, does it stall somewhere during the loading process?
>>
>> What exactly does it do?
>
> I’ve tried the Rescue, Net Install and DVD isos on both optical disks
> and usb flash drives.
>
> As I recall the Net Install disk offers both Rescue and Install options
> and has gotten farther into the process but what happens is it finally
> reboots the computer.
>
> I can also boot into the partition (openSuse took over the Grub and it’s
> Plymouth screen appears) and it tries to load the system before running
> into a mortal error, and stopping - it says it’s going to reboot, but
> doesn’t. It gets stuck.

Try booting the dvd in failsafe mode (I’m uncertain of the naming).

Seeing that your machine is problematic, I would have skipped upgrading,
and remained on 13.1 evergreen. Just an opinion…

Another idea, seeing that your machine you say has an early
implementation of usb3, is adding an usb2 card, assuming they can boot,
and use it. Otherwise, you should use something connected on the
SATA/eSATA bus. You could use an external hd used as if it were flash
bootable media…

Also, make sure to disable plymouth. It is “plymouth.enable=0” boot
option. Just in case. Also, you can use text mode - both on the
installed system and on the installer DVD. I’m unsure how to trigger it,
though.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

On 2014-12-09 05:06, Fraser Bell wrote:
>
> We could have arrived here quicker, but it was not clear that you could
> boot with a Live openSUSE device, at least to me.

I think he can not :-?


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

… well … yeah … I am now thoroughly confused about that.:sarcastic: