Unable to boot Suse 12.2

I have been happily running Suse 12.2 on a multi-boot computer with a separate boot manager, Acronis OSS. I have Suse 12.2 installed with its own /boot, /, and /home partitions.

Recently while in Suse something must have happened. When I now try to boot Suse the grub graphical menu screen comes up as usual. However if I attempt to boot using the latest entry, or any of the earlier entries, I get a “File not found” message. I really do not recall what I may have done from within Suse 12.2 to cause this problem. Maybe it was an update or maybe I went to the Yast Boot menu item and chose something, but whatever I did was through the graphical system and Suse 12.2 should not have fouled itself up in this way.

I have a fairly recent backup of all my Suse partitions ( 3 weeks ago ) so I can try restoring them and I should be successful. But before I do that I wanted to ask if there is anything else I could try ? Should I boot using the installation disk and try to re-install grub ? Any other suggestions ? All help will be appreciated.

The first thing that I would do was indeed reinstall grub using the DVD or a LiveCD.

If the OP needs help with GRUB re-install, this article](https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Repair_MBR_after_Windows_install) might help (it helped me).

Hi !

You will not expect that this is supported in any way by neither openSUSE, nor windows …

This is just fine, but this has nothing to do with booting.

You can do a lot of damage “in the graphical system” like you call it, i.e. even if you’re not using the command line.

Wait for a moment with restoring anything !
You still are not aware what went wrong, or what the damage exactly is about !

Booting from any Linux LiveCD (like even e.g. PartedMagic ) is a very good idea here.
That would permit you to check whether your data is still around
(I would guess that your data still is around, unless you were playing with partitions or had hardware problems).
I would say it’s not recommended to restore any data before that check !

Attempting to re-install the boot loader then of course is the next logical step.

Or perhaps attempting to install it in lieu of the “Acronis OS Selector” … :slight_smile:

Did you already try to get “Acronis OSS” fixing the situation ?

It is not an Acronis OSS problem. OSS goes to the boot code in the Suse boot partition without any problems and the Suse graphical boot acreen shows up fine. It is after choosing an entry from the boot screen that Suse was failing.

I could not boot Suse 12.2 after reinstalling grub from the installation DVD, as the same bootup error occurred. After restoring my Suse partitions I was able to bootup again. However something normal I am doing in Suse 12.2 is causing this problem because it re-occurred again. And again I was able to restore my latest backup partitions and reboot into Suse. I believe the problem has something to do with using either the Yast Boot Loader or with installing the latest kernel. I will try to narrow it down and reply again about the cause of the problem in another entry…

In the meantime I decided to try to look at my /boot folder under Suse. What I saw there seemed strange First there is a link back to the /boot folder itself. Then there are separate grub and grub2 folders, which does seem normal. I assume I am using grub and not grub2 to boot into Suse from the boot partition. So I wonder if I can just uninstall grub2 completely. Furthermore when I looked in the boot folder itself I only found a single vmlinuz kernel. Here is the folder contents:

“total 30732
-rw------- 1 root root 512 Jun 5 2012 backup_mbr
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 1 Oct 16 21:22 boot -> .
-rw-r–r-- 1 root root 1236 Jul 15 2012 boot.readme
-rw-r–r-- 1 root root 131335 Jan 31 10:03 config-3.4.28-2.20-desktop
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Feb 28 07:50 grub
drwxr-xr-x 6 root root 4096 Jan 8 06:57 grub2
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 26 Feb 28 07:50 initrd -> initrd-3.4.28-2.20-desktop
-rw-r–r-- 1 root root 17275887 Feb 28 07:50 initrd-3.4.28-2.20-desktop
drwx------ 2 root root 16384 Jun 5 2012 lost+found
-rw-r–r-- 1 root root 582144 Oct 17 22:53 message
-rw-r–r-- 1 root root 222467 Jan 31 12:18 symvers-3.4.28-2.20-desktop.gz
-rw-r–r-- 1 root root 516 Jan 31 12:18 sysctl.conf-3.4.28-2.20-desktop
-rw-r–r-- 1 root root 2489612 Jan 31 11:54 System.map-3.4.28-2.20-desktop
-rw-r–r-- 1 root root 5725189 Jan 31 12:17 vmlinux-3.4.28-2.20-desktop.gz
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 27 Feb 28 07:49 vmlinuz -> vmlinuz-3.4.28-2.20-desktop
-rw-r–r-- 1 root root 4924080 Jan 31 11:55 vmlinuz-3.4.28-2.20-desktop”

When I look at menu.lst I see a number of grub2 entries which thinks that I am booting from the MBR (hd0) rather than my Suse boot partition (hd0,4). Here is menu.lst:

"# Modified by YaST2. Last modification on Thu Feb 28 07:50:03 EST 2013

THIS FILE WILL BE PARTIALLY OVERWRITTEN by perl-Bootloader

For the new kernel it try to figure out old parameters. In case we are not able to recognize it (e.g. change of flavor or strange install order ) it it use as fallback installation parameters from /etc/sysconfig/bootloader

default 0
timeout 8
gfxmenu (hd0,4)/message

###Don’t change this comment - YaST2 identifier: Original name: linux###
title Desktop – openSUSE 12.2 - 3.4.28-2.20
root (hd0)
kernel /vmlinuz-3.4.28-2.20-desktop root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/cb9fc3bc-b1d3-48e1-98a8-7b24a8ba2091 resume=/dev/sdb15 splash=silent quiet video=1280x1024 showopts vga=0x31a
initrd /initrd-3.4.28-2.20-desktop

###Don’t change this comment - YaST2 identifier: Original name: failsafe###
title Failsafe – openSUSE 12.2 - 3.4.28-2.20
root (hd0)
kernel /vmlinuz-3.4.28-2.20-desktop root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/cb9fc3bc-b1d3-48e1-98a8-7b24a8ba2091 showopts apm=off noresume edd=off powersaved=off nohz=off highres=off processor.max_cstate=1 nomodeset x11failsafe vga=0x31a
initrd /initrd-3.4.28-2.20-desktop

###Don’t change this comment - YaST2 identifier: Original name: linux###
title GNU GRUB 2 – openSUSE 12.2 - GNU GRUB 2 /boot/grub2/core.img /boot/grub2/core.img
kernel (hd0)/grub2/core.img root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/cb9fc3bc-b1d3-48e1-98a8-7b24a8ba2091 resume=/dev/sdb15 splash=silent quiet video=1280x1024 showopts vga=0x31a

###Don’t change this comment - YaST2 identifier: Original name: linux###
title GNU GRUB 2 – openSUSE 12.2 - GNU GRUB 2 /boot/grub2/core.img
kernel (hd0)/grub2/core.img root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/cb9fc3bc-b1d3-48e1-98a8-7b24a8ba2091 resume=/dev/sdb15 splash=silent quiet video=1280x1024 showopts vga=0x31a

###Don’t change this comment - YaST2 identifier: Original name: linux###
title GNU GRUB 2 – openSUSE 12.2 - GNU GRUB 2 /boot/grub2/core.img (hd0)/grub2/core.img
kernel (hd0)/grub2/core.img root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/cb9fc3bc-b1d3-48e1-98a8-7b24a8ba2091 resume=/dev/sdb15 splash=silent quiet video=1280x1024 showopts vga=0x31a

###Don’t change this comment - YaST2 identifier: Original name: linux###
title Desktop – openSUSE 12.2 - 3.4.11-2.16
root (hd0,4)
kernel /vmlinuz-3.4.11-2.16-desktop root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/cb9fc3bc-b1d3-48e1-98a8-7b24a8ba2091 resume=/dev/sdb15 splash=silent quiet video=1280x1024 showopts vga=0x31a
initrd /initrd-3.4.11-2.16-desktop

###Don’t change this comment - YaST2 identifier: Original name: failsafe###
title Failsafe – openSUSE 12.2 - 3.4.11-2.16
root (hd0,4)
kernel /vmlinuz-3.4.11-2.16-desktop root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/cb9fc3bc-b1d3-48e1-98a8-7b24a8ba2091 showopts apm=off noresume edd=off powersaved=off nohz=off highres=off processor.max_cstate=1 nomodeset x11failsafe vga=0x31a
initrd /initrd-3.4.11-2.16-desktop

###Don’t change this comment - YaST2 identifier: Original name: linux###
title Desktop – openSUSE 12.2 - 3.4.6-2.10
kernel (hd0,4)/vmlinuz-3.4.6-2.10-desktop root=/dev/sdb5 resume=/dev/sdb15 splash=silent quiet video=1280x1024 showopts vga=0x31a
initrd (hd0,4)/initrd-3.4.6-2.10-desktop

###Don’t change this comment - YaST2 identifier: Original name: failsafe###
title Failsafe – openSUSE 12.2 - 3.4.6-2.10
kernel (hd0,4)/vmlinuz-3.4.6-2.10-desktop root=/dev/sdb5 showopts apm=off noresume edd=off powersaved=off nohz=off highres=off processor.max_cstate=1 nomodeset x11failsafe vga=0x31a
initrd (hd0,4)/initrd-3.4.6-2.10-desktop

###Don’t change this comment - YaST2 identifier: Original name: linux###
title GNU GRUB 2 – openSUSE 12.2 - GNU GRUB 2 (hd0,4)/grub2/core.img
kernel (hd0,4)/grub2/core.img root=/dev/sdb5 resume=/dev/disk/by-uuid/cc9d21d0-2a70-46b1-9836-a7d9d2e5f360 splash=silent quiet video=1280x1024 showopts vga=0x31a"

So I think my problem has something to do with Suse 12.2 having become confused as to where my kernela exist and from where I am booting. But I have little idea at how to best straighten things out. The good thing is that I am taking backups of my Suse partitions each time I am trying to do anything with this problem in Suse, so i can always go back to the latest stable Suse if something goes wrong.

As mentioned above I will add another entry to this thread as soon as I can determine what is causing Suse to mess up my ability to boot.

Thanks for any help you can give me. It is always appreciated.

I would try after making a copy of this file menu.lst to clean it up by removing all entries which have no valid paths and try to boot again.
why tnow this is root (hd0)? it used to be root (hd0,4) which is the probably correct partition. Try to change that for the kernel kernel /vmlinuz-3.4.28-2.20-desktop and wherever appears like that.
You have 2 entries for previous kernels and both were located on hd(0,4) not hd(0). I had a problem when this file was incorrectly created with a kernel upgrade so I would be surprised to see this be for some unknown reasons incorrectly created.

Hi !

Point 1: your /boot/grub/menu.lst doesn’t look nice.
It rather looks like that you have been installing Legacy GRUB subsequent to installing GRUB 2,
which would explain well the ‘GNU GRUB 2’ entries there.

No, this isn’t normal.

Point 2: Your output in part is almost unreadable. Please post in code tags, see:

https://forums.opensuse.org/english/get-technical-help-here/how-faq-forums/advanced-how-faq-read-only/451526-posting-code-tags-guide.html

As dmera already pointed out, you additionally have boot entries for different Linux kernels.

It looks like you tried very many things, but it seems that at one point you changed too much.

You write that you have backups of running installations of openSUSE.

I would suggest that you either return to one of those, or that you make a clean install,
with only one boot loader (i.e. either Legacy GRUB, or GRUB 2, but not both).

Perhaps you may even want to wait another 2 weeks time to install openSUSE 12.3 then.

As far as I guess you’d probably like to try it anyway, sooner or later.
Right ? :wink:

Good luck
Mike

(edit: typo)

I can try cleaning up menu.lst by physically removing the invalid entries but I think Suse itself regenerates it from somewhere so even if I changed it Suse would overwrite my changes.

Also I can’t seem to find most of the kernels in the menu.lst anywhere within my /boot folder or subfolders. Where might they be ?

I had Suse 11.4, probably updated from Suse 10.3, and then I updated to Suse 12.2. But really I have not tried anything clever and have run a largely vanilla and minimum Suse installation. My interest is almost strictly in programming so I have kept Suse pretty bare.

I never tried to install grub on top of grub2. I have just let Suse do whatever it normally does when it upgrades.

Whatever is in my menu.lst is what Suse itself has put there.

Where are my kernels ? I can only find one in my boot folder/subfolders ?
Why do I have an entry in my boot folder which links back to the boot folder, causing an endlessly recursive directory structure ?

I meant, when referring to my backups, that I keep the latest backup and one backup before that at all times. I have also been careful to make backups of my Suse partitions pretty regularly now, since I have experienced this intermittent boot problem. I don’t think the earlier of my two backups is going to solve what the menu.lst looks like or the odd /boot folder directory structure.

Making a clean install sounds like I will lose my current carefully setup system. Well I can try to make a clean install of Suse 12.2 ( or 12.3 shortly ) and tell Suse not to format my /home partition. That sounds like a good way to go if there is no way to straighten out my /boot folder or menu.lst or find my kernels.

I don’t think that the menu.lst will be regenerated after. The reason I’m saying this is that I modified in the past, mine was also unbootable and the path to the kernels was partial. I edited having another system as a model and it worked for me. So knowing that you have your backups I would try this menu.lst update, but I don’t know how the /boot affects you, only by trying this change you will be able to figure out if this is the culprit or not. Good luck. I wouldn’t give up yet that you’ll find a solution to keep this updated system instead of having a new installation.

You probably didn’t do it intentionally.
But your /boot/grub/menu.lst just looks like that.

You can find the path where to look for the kernels in the /boot/grub/menu.lst that you posted.
If these kernels shouldn’t be around anymore, you could well delete the respective entries in your /boot/grub/menu.lst.

When upgrading to a newer version of openSUSE, there absolutely is NO need to delete a separate /home partition,
if this one already exists (there are setups, even suggested by the openSUSE installer in the past,
for which root and home are on the same partition - which isn’t helpful).

Firstly, it will be reasonable to make a backup of your current /home partition.
Secondly, it will help to remove the invisible folders and files from that /home partition - those ones,
the names of which begin with a period/dot ‘.’.

If you then want to keep your /home, during the installation of openSUSE, at least in the past you could not accept the
suggestions of the openSUSE installer with respect to the partitions to be created or used, because these suggestions would have
in general destroyed at least part of your existing partitions (which in case of ‘/’ or root is OK, but not in case of ‘/home’ !!).

You will have to create a manual setup with respect to the partitionning of the hard disk during installation instead.

Even if you keep your /home, by proceeding like that, you will install a new version of openSUSE, completely overwriting the old one.
That’s what I meant by a clean installation.

However, I suggest you really wait until openSUSE 12.3 is available,
so you don’t get tempted to again change the operating system just shortly after you’ve installed one.

Good luck
Mike

(edit: ‘or used’)

On 03/01/2013 03:36 AM, eldiener wrote:

> I had Suse 11.4, probably updated from Suse 10.3, and then I updated to
> Suse 12.2. But really I have not tried anything clever and have run a
> largely vanilla and minimum Suse installation. My interest is almost
> strictly in programming so I have kept Suse pretty bare.
>
> I never tried to install grub on top of grub2. I have just let Suse do
> whatever it normally u updoes when it upgrades.

When you upgrade to 12.2 from 11.4 your grub 1 will be respected, but
you also get some grub 2 entries in case you want to try grub 2 and migrate.

>
> Whatever is in my menu.lst is what Suse itself has put there.
>
> Where are my kernels ? I can only find one in my boot folder/subfolders
> ?

It is possible to have more entries in the menu file than kernels you
have. Means you have to clean up the file.

Simply comment out the entries you think that are not right, then test.
Later, remove them. But make sure that the entry that does boot is not
altered!

> Why do I have an entry in my boot folder which links back to the boot
> folder, causing an endlessly recursive directory structure ?

Dunno, it has been there since ever. Does no damage and it is
intentional. For what intention, no idea.


Cheers/Saludos
Carlos E. R. (12.3 Dartmouth test at Minas-Anor)

I guess simply to allow you to say /boot/vmlinuz without thinking whether /boot is on separate partition or not. The link belongs to grub and is not present in 12.3 where grub is not installed by default.

Sorry, forgot something,

in the directory .thunderbird within your /home/(user) directory your past eMails are stored.
You probably don’t want to delete that.

On 2013-03-02 06:06, arvidjaar wrote:
>
> robin_listas;2531182 Wrote:
>>> Why do I have an entry in my boot folder which links back to the boot
>>> folder, causing an endlessly recursive directory structure ?
>>
>> Dunno, it has been there since ever. Does no damage and it is
>> intentional. For what intention, no idea.
>>
>
> I guess simply to allow you to say /boot/vmlinuz without thinking
> whether /boot is on separate partition or not. The link belongs to grub
> and is not present in 12.3 where grub is not installed by default.

I have it on 12.3 and grub2:


> minas-tirith:~ # l /other/boot/
> total 90760
> drwxr-xr-x  4 root root     4096 Mar  2 12:59 ./
> drwxr-xr-x 24 root root     4096 Mar  2 12:59 ../
> -rw-r--r--  1 root root  2532324 Mar  1 13:48 System.map-3.7.10-1.1-desktop
> -rw-r--r--  1 root root  2532385 Feb 24 08:08 System.map-3.7.9-1.1-desktop
> -rw-r--r--  1 root root      512 Mar  1 16:07 backup_mbr
> lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root        1 Mar  1 15:59 boot -> ./    <===========


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4, with Evergreen, x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

bor@opensuse:~> rpm -qf  /boot/boot
grub-0.97-185.1.2.x86_64

Same on 12.3.

As long as its normal, and others have it, I am not going to worry about it.