"ù" character on US QWERTY

How do I compose the ‘ù’ character on a US QWERTY keyboard?

Enable the Compose key, usually you choose the Windows key or the Menu key, in Regional settings > Keyboard layout and then you can enter it as Compose ` u. Analogous sequences work for other accented characters, e.g. ú, and characters like € (Compose = E).

So as far as I can tell, it can not be done with the standard English keyboard and would require a different language. Or, you can run the program:

/usr/bin/charmap

Character Map Examples: ÙÚÛÜűŰųŵů

And select the Character from a Listing or from this web site here:

Typing Spanish Written Accents

Example Selections from Web Site: áéíóú¿¡üñ

Thank You,

Nope, that’s what compose sequences are for.

Nope, that’s what compose sequences are for.
Which is not enabled by default and must take away a key for use as something else. Yes I did see that description, but was unsure you would want to give up a key, which was called a “dead key” for this purpose. Also, at least in the past, such keyboard modifications either did not work well or did not work at all. Can’t say for sure on the most recent version of openSUSE.

Thank You,

Most Linux users have no use for a Windows key, except for this purpose. There is usually a key you can give up. You phrased your answer as it it couldn’t be done at all, which is certainly not the case.

Not only does it work well on openSUSE, but also other distros. The setting panel is part of KDE. There is something analogous for GNOME. They both work on the X server settings. Recently the console and X server keyboard settings were unified which should make life less confusing.

I would update my config, except that I’m stuck on login because my account information contains the “ù”… This was a fresh openSUSE 11.4 RC1 install. Should I reinstall with ASCII-compatible account information or is there a better solution?

Hi,

if you can, login as root and simply create another user (w/o accented chars…).

I m’ not sure whether you can modify the normal user’s password as root as well (which would be even easier), but you could certainly try!

HTH
Lenwolf

On 02/19/2011 10:06 AM, pdedecker wrote:
>
> Should I reinstall with ASCII-compatible account
> information or is there a better solution?

you do not have to reinstall in order to change a password…use YaST
> Security & Users > User & Group Management

just edit it to what you want and click ok


DenverD
CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
[NNTP posted w/openSUSE 11.3, KDE4.5.5, Thunderbird3.0.11, nVidia
173.14.28 3D, Athlon 64 3000+]
“It is far easier to read, understand and follow the instructions than
to undo the problems caused by not.” DD 23 Jan 11

I know, but the thing is that I can’t login as myself or root because I let AutoYaST set up the default account with a special character that apparently isn’t available on US QWERTY keyboards, which is the keymap that AutoYaST was told to use by a VMware script.

I’ve deleted the hard drive image and I’m now doing a reinstall.

On 02/19/2011 11:06 AM, pdedecker wrote:
>
> I’ve deleted the hard drive image and I’m now doing a reinstall.

there ways to bypass a root password (say, one that has been forgotten
OR contains a non-available letter) without reinstalling:
http://tinyurl.com/5rv8fdl

by the way: openSUSE 11.4 RC1 is pre-release software and as a
software tester i whould have expected you to know how to solve this
minor problem…

and, the forum for help with testing software is here:
http://forums.opensuse.org/english/get-technical-help-here/pre-release-beta/


DenverD
CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
[NNTP posted w/openSUSE 11.3, KDE4.5.5, Thunderbird3.0.11, nVidia
173.14.28 3D, Athlon 64 3000+]
“It is far easier to read, understand and follow the instructions than
to undo the problems caused by not.” DD 23 Jan 11

On 2011-02-19 00:36, jdmcdaniel3 wrote:
>
>> Nope, that’s what compose sequences are for.

> Which is not enabled by default and must take away a key for use as
> something else.

By default it is [shift], [shift][ctrl]. It doesn’t take any key out. But
it is easier to change the keyboard to be US-international.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” at Telcontar)

By default it is [shift], [shift][ctrl]. It doesn’t take any key out. But
it is easier to change the keyboard to be US-international.
I sorry Carlos but the [shift], [shift][ctrl] sequence does not cause anything to happen on my US keyboard setup.

Thank You,

On 2011-02-19 16:06, jdmcdaniel3 wrote:
>
>> By default it is [shift], [shift][ctrl]. It doesn’t take any key out.
>> But it is easier to change the keyboard to be US-international.

> I sorry Carlos but the [shift], [shift][ctrl] sequence does not cause
> anything to happen on my US keyboard setup.

It is shift, release, sift-ctrl, release, 'a and I get á. Sometimes it also
works without the first shift. Right hand only. I’m not using KDE.

Tested on two computers.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” at Telcontar)

This is all I get Carlos: 'a

I presume you might be able to configure any operation with your keyboard, but by default I am not seeing this work for me with a US keyboard setup. Certainly this is a problem if this was in your login name, you had the standard US keyboard setup and you had to login before you could do anything else. I have tried this on openSUSE 11.2, 11.3 and 11.4 where no attempt had been made to make any special setup with the keyboard from its default.

Thank You,

That was my first time downloading a pre-release Linux ISO. I gotta start somewhere, don’t I? Also, wow… I had no idea that you could bypass Linux passwords that easily. When I forget Windows passwords, I have to download an ISO and let a certain tool run for a while. It’s nice to have a backdoor, but it’s really insecure.

This question wasn’t related to pre-release software. It pertains to all openSUSE versions and by extension to all X Window System-enabled Linux distributions.

On 02/19/2011 05:36 PM, pdedecker wrote:
>
> but it’s really insecure.

true, if you do not exercise positive physical control of your machine
you have zero security…but, that is true of all operating systems
i’m aware of…

there are ways to set booby traps which will destroy the hard drive if
tripped…and, of course there is always encryption…

> It pertains to
> all openSUSE versions and by extension to all X Window System-enabled
> Linux distributions.

consider my note as a future pointer for pre-release questions…


DenverD
CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
[NNTP posted w/openSUSE 11.3, KDE4.5.5, Thunderbird3.0.11, nVidia
173.14.28 3D, Athlon 64 3000+]
“It is far easier to read, understand and follow the instructions than
to undo the problems caused by not.” DD 23 Jan 11

On 2011-02-19 17:06, jdmcdaniel3 wrote:
>
> This is all I get Carlos: 'a

Funny. Are you using kde, perhaps? Maybe it makes a difference. Try another
environment.

> I presume you might be able to configure any operation with your
> keyboard, but by default I am not seeing this work for me with a US
> keyboard setup. Certainly this is a problem if this was in your login
> name, you had the standard US keyboard setup and you had to login before
> you could do anything else.

I would not use those chars for login. I have always been afraid of that
problem - in emergency mode, linux doesn’t boot with i18n keyboard, it
reverts to US even if your keyboard is not US.

> I have tried this on openSUSE 11.2, 11.3
> and 11.4 where no attempt had been made to make any special setup with
> the keyboard from its default.

I tried two systems, one 11.2 upgraded from 8.x in steps, and another with
11.2 fresh. Both have the Spanish keyboard. I also have a computer with a
US keyboard, but it runs 7.3 and can’t power it up easily. As far as I
remember, compose worked on it just fine.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” at Telcontar)

On 2011-02-19 17:36, pdedecker wrote:

> have to download an ISO and let a certain tool run for a while. It’s
> nice to have a backdoor, but it’s really insecure.

Unless you encrypt the disk, from linux you can read the entire windows
partition without knowing the password - provided you can mount it, of course.

The linux password only protects a running system, and only if the attacker
can not have physical access. The password is more important for remote
access. If you can not guard from physical access, you need encryption.

Now, I’m curious: what tool is that you use to “break” into windows? Once I
forgot my password, and had to search for the slip of paper for hours. I
found it at last, but such a tool could be handy.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” at Telcontar)

I don’t remember, sorry. I came across it one day, but never used it. It might have been Ophcrack. (@Mods: if this link violates the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, I’ll remove it. No hard feelings.)