Too many choices

My new video card and my new monitor (which haven’t arrived yet) have multiple connections. Among them are HDMI and DVI and Mini Display connectors. I ordered an HDMI cable as it made a very big difference in the connection between the cable box and the TV. Of course, I’m now second guessing myself. And I don’t yet have the equipment to look at the instruction sheets.

So, what’s the general consensus? HDMI or DVI or…?

Why so many choices?

Bart

Let me guess. Because people all the time make new inventions. And because these new inventions promise to the customers (the general people) a bright new world, they are offered for sale. And because there is a large base of people still using the old, the old must also be supported. And thus interfaces for oldest, older, old, present, new, newer and newest are all offered. After all when you offer all of them on your device, you can sell more hardware and in the same time make people happy.

My conclusion, it is the customer (you included) that wants all these possibilities and choices to be offered on the market.

I stick with HDMI whenever possible. Why? It is digital so I prefer it
over analog VGA, it is fairly standard on all devices we have here so I
only need one type of cable at home and when a cable dies (and sometimes
they die as we have two cats who cannot be trained not to play with
them) I can quickly take one from the TV or DVD player or satellite
receiver … and reuse it for the computer monitor until I get a new one
or the other way around, whatever is killed first.


PC: oS 12.3 x86_64 | i7-2600@3.40GHz | 16GB | KDE 4.10.0 | GTX 650 Ti
ThinkPad E320: oS 12.3 x86_64 | i3@2.30GHz | 8GB | KDE 4.10.2 | HD 3000
HannsBook: oS 12.3 x86_64 | SU4100@1.3GHz | 2GB | KDE 4.10.0 | GMA4500

On 04/14/2013 01:06 PM, hcvv wrote:
>
> montana_suse_user;2547524 Wrote:
>>
>> Why so many choices?
>>
> Let me guess. Because people all the time make new inventions. And
> because these new inventions promise to the customers (the general
> people) a bright new world, they are offered for sale. And because there
> is a large base of people still using the old, the old must also be
> supported. And thus interfaces for oldest, older, old, present, new,
> newer and newest are all offered. After all when you offer all of them
> on your device, you can sell more hardware and in the same time make
> people happy.
>
> My conclusion, it is the customer (you included) that wants all these
> possibilities and choices to be offered on the market.

EXCELLENT reasoning and conclusion!!!


dd

I would think that it is the failure on the part of the nation from adopting “standards”. We all have standard electrical sockets and all devices can draw power from those sockets. Unfortunately there are very few standards adopted by many nations with regard to electronic goods. I cannot use same charger for mobile phones from various manufacturers.:\

On Sun, 14 Apr 2013 04:46:01 GMT
montana suse user <montana_suse_user@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

>
> My new video card and my new monitor (which haven’t arrived yet) have
> multiple connections. Among them are HDMI and DVI and Mini Display
> connectors. I ordered an HDMI cable as it made a very big difference
> in the connection between the cable box and the TV. Of course, I’m
> now second guessing myself. And I don’t yet have the equipment to
> look at the instruction sheets.
>
> So, what’s the general consensus? HDMI or DVI or…?
>

In my experience, the answer is ‘it depends.’ I use HDMI connecting TV
to DVD player and cable box but DVI connecting the PC. Although HDMI
is fine for the first two, the picture was dismal when HDMI was used for
connecting the PC; a switch to DVI cured the trouble. The video card,
ATI Radeon, may be the problem and a different card might have been OK.


Graham P Davis, Bracknell, Berks.
openSUSE 12.3 (64-bit); KDE 4.10.00; AMD Phenom II X2 550 Processor;
Kernel: 3.8.6; Video: nVidia GeForce 210 (using nouveau driver);
Sound: ATI SBx00 Azalia (Intel HDA); Wireless: BCM4306

So it looks like the best choice is what works best in my situation. I guess I’ll buy one of each and see what happens.

Thanks all for your replies.

Bart

You should search about a bit with focus on DRM - Digital Rights Management.
My detailed knowledge is somewhat dated, but I believe you will find that the Physical layer signaling is the same.
DVI was developed as the first PC to Monitor digital interface, some called it digital RGB.
There are mechanical adapters to turn HDMI into DVI, but not the other way.

To comply with DRM “rules” and licenses, a source (DVD Player, set top box, etc) must authenticate the displays DRM compliance, HDMI is 2-way to facilitate this.
A PC running acceptable DRM, such as MS Silverlight, is cryptographically capable of decoding a BluRay DVD and sending it to an HDMI display, but not DVI
If a non-authenticated link for DRM’d content is detected, the source is obligated(by license) to downgrade the Quality of the content to something equivalent to VHS video. That might explain you performance issues.

Due to the limited availability of OpenSource workarounds, processing DRM’d content is limited on OpenSUSE and others.
It is, of course, technically possible since the vast majority of intelligent consumer electronics run on Linux, but use proprietary code.

Bottom line - if you need an interface for DRM’d content (BluRay, NetFlix, etc), your only choice is HDMI

cmcgrath,

Interesting! Its strange that Asus included a DVI cable with the monitor but no HDMI. This is a new model, 27 inch LCD display, back lighted built in speakers and even a web cam. There was a USB cable for the camera, and a cable for sound and the power cord.

I do have a HDMI cable and so I guess I’ll connect it to see if I notice any difference. I do understand that if I connect a Blu-ray player or netflix device, I’ll need the HDMI cable between the monitor and that device.

Thank you for your time.

Bart

You called it a Monitor, not a TV (at 27", both do exist) so I’ll guess that the Monitor is not HDMI (copy protection) compliant.
Built-in web cam is probably the key - I have not seen "TV"s with web cams yet, but new feature TVs (built in web appliance) are coming out fast so the distinction is getting blurred.
So you probably can drive the Monitor via the HDMI port on your card, using an adaptor (HDMI->DVI).
Or, does not Monitor also have an HDMI connector(you did not specifically say, I assumed not)?
You will not be able (without hacks) to view DRM protected content, and you will need separate audio cable to access the display’s speakers.

Just for example, I have a media PC running openSUSE, has an HDMI (as well as DVI and RGB) video outputs.
I use HDMI to interface to my Samsung DLP TV, works great for standard content, video and sound one one cable.
A big difference, for some, is that Monitors frequently have much better than 1920x1080 resolution. Most “TV” class displays are max 1920x1080p. Hard core gamers would probably add that monitors have better(faster) refresh rates.

It would be reasonable to assume that HDMI ''certification" costs the manufacturer a license fee, so you don’t see HDMI on units that are not expected/intended to touch DRMd content.

Happy viewing.