There now is an easy way to create OpenSUSE Live USB sticks !

Hi there,

I just would like to let you know that I released a new version of my software today (LiLi 2.6) that will let you create OpenSUSE Live USB VERY EASILY in Windows.

Some may consider this as an advertisement and it is. But before throwing any rocks to me, be aware that my software is FREE AND OPEN-SOURCE lol! so i don’t have much to win/lose. Many of my users ask for OpenSUSE support. So here I am.

The only bad news is that it only works on Windows.

It currently supports OpenSUSE 11.3 KDE and GNOME.

No persistence for the moment. That was already quite a challenge to make it work as a Live USB without any patch.

If you are interested, please visit http://www.linuxliveusb.com

I hope you will enjoy my work.

Do not hesitate to make some feedbacks through the contact form on the website. (please DO NOT use it for technical issues).

Have a nice day,

Thibaut

PS: I will not do any support in this forum. Please use the BugTracking system instead.

linuxliveusb wrote:
> I just would like to let you know that I released a new version of my
> software today (LiLi 2.6) that will let you create OpenSUSE Live USB
> VERY EASILY
in Windows.

please help me understand the reason/worth of a “virtualization to
directly run Linux in Windows”…

perhaps i do not understand, but to me that sounds like depending on
the more frail and security weak of the two…wouldn’t it be better
to run a nice secure Linux as the base and then a virtual Windows on
top…that way when the Windows gets infected/rooted/winbotted (and it
will) all one has to do is kill/restart the compromised Windows session…

but, if you run Linux in Windows, when the Win is taken over you have
to take down everything and relaunch all the virtual sessions…

so, what is the point of doing it upside down?


DenverD
CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD [posted via NNTP w/openSUSE 10.3]

Virtualization is one possibility. You can either boot from VirtualBox or directly from your machine’s BIOS.

Please keep in mind that a Live USB is far away from being a production system or even an everyday desktop. At each reboot your system will go back to its original state, whatever you do with it.

Maybe you don’t see why virtualization is so important but it really is. Stop thinking like it is a real install and try to think like a lambda Windows user who would like to try Linux.

Let’s say you are a very basic Windows user and you don’t even know what a BIOS is. Then VirtualBox is a way to try Linux without having to change anything to your system and to your BIOS. Some PC’s are not even capable of booting off a USB stick when VirtualBox always is.

A “very basic Windows user and you don’t even know what a BIOS is” can handle any another software?

linuxliveusb wrote:
> Virtualization is one possibility. You can either boot from VirtualBox
> or directly from your machine’s BIOS.

ok…i missed that part (boot directly to Linux), i guess because you
wrote “The only bad news is that it only works on Windows.”

> Please keep in mind that a Live USB is far away from being a production
> system or even an everyday desktop. At each reboot your system will go
> back to its original state, whatever you do with it.

would seem to me with a large enough UBS stick you should be able to
boot from a read only partition but store files/configurations on a
second, writable partition…

> Maybe you don’t see why virtualization is so important but it really
> is. Stop thinking like it is a real install and try to think like a
> lambda Windows user who would like to try Linux.

they could boot directly from a Live CD…no?

> Let’s say you are a very basic Windows user and you don’t even know
> what a BIOS is. Then VirtualBox is a way to try Linux without having to
> change anything to your system and to your BIOS. Some PC’s are not even
> capable of booting off a USB stick when VirtualBox always is.

ok…btw, i’m not trying to stop you, just trying to understand who
would want to run Linux in (or on top of) Windows…

if it were me i’d build a UBS stick that boots to Linux, mounts found
MS file systems, and then runs Windows in a VM which protected from
bot/virus attacks by the underlying Linux sniffing and
filtering…THAT is something i think might make a little change for
its maker…[if you do i’d be happy to reap a very small percentage
for giving the idea.]


DenverD
CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD [posted via NNTP w/openSUSE 10.3]

I happen to like this idea. If anyone else who’s replying went to the link that was posted, it’s an easy way to create a liveusb of openSUSE. We all know that unetbootin doesn’t seem to work right (how many people run into the live image not found problem?), and having a new person who’s not knowledgable in computers try to dd the image to a usb stick can get complicated especially if they’re only currently running windows. Yes there are live-cds but why waste money on making cds when you can use a usb stick everytime, plus how about netbook users who don’t have a cd or dvd drive? This isn’t a plug to run linux on windows, that’s just an option. It’s a way to make an openSUSE live cd (it does other linux distros too). From the looks of the screenshot it seems pretty simple to do. Once I get home from work I will try this and give some feedback.

Take Care,

Ian

thank you for this constructive comment. You are defending my project better than me rotfl!

Do you want a job @ LinuxLive USB corporation ? We have a very motivated team of 1 people.

linuxliveusb wrote:
> thank you for this constructive comment. You are defending my project
> better than me rotfl!

sorry you felt like i was attacking your work, and that you had to
defend it…

instead of attacking i was trying to understand why anyone could want
to put (for example) a fine, safe, nimble and quick Mercedes on the
bed of an old technology Ford carry-all truck and sit in the Mercedes
while someone you can’t trust drove the Ford to where you wanted to
go, if it didn’t break down or get infected on the way!!

to me, it just seems easier, safer and better to just go get in my
Mercedes and drive myself in comfort and safety and let someone else
worry about their old Ford’s frailties…

now, if you wanna market a way to haul around broken Fords (or
auto-repair their infections) with a perfectly running Mercedes, that
is a different ball of wax i can understand the need for!!


DenverD
CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD [posted via NNTP w/openSUSE 10.3]

I lost my reply so I will try again.

I don’t understand why you keep comparing Windows and OpenSUSE. This thread is not about running OpenSUSE on Windows nor replacing Windows with OpenSUSE ! It is about being able to test OpenSUSE and install it from a Live USB instead of having to burn it to a CD/DVD. Like ijbreaky said : virtualization in an option (quite useful actually).

LiveUSB are not meant to replace your main OS. They are meant for 5 usages :

→ Trying and testing (just like a LiveCD, but without having to burn anything)
→ Installing the OS (netbooks usually can’t even install from CD’s)
→ As a rescue system (oh ! my windows ****** up its FAT32 partition … how can i get my data back easily ?)
→ For demonstration purpose (showing OpenSUSE to your Windows friends without messing with theirs computers)
→ As a portable OS (some uses LiveUSB as portable dev environments or for security pentesting)

Moreover, some LiveUSBs offers persistency which allow users to keep some datas and almost have a real system. This is something that LiveCDs usually does not offer easily.

Main purpose of virtualization is for users to try their Linux without having to change anything to their BIOSes. Why do a reboot when you don’t have to ? Trying Linux “on the fly” is very convenient. I’ve already tried more than 150 ones using this method (i tried every single ISO supported by LiLi).

And i did not even talk about DVD’s. Some old PCs do not have a DVD writer, in that case, burning it to a USB stick is a blessing.

Are you able to see why it could be useful now ?

linuxliveusb wrote:
> Are you able to see why it could be useful now ?

yes thanks…

i was confused by your earlier create “OpenSUSE Live USB VERY EASILY
in Windows” and “it only works on Windows”…

i think i now understand that what you meant to write was that you
have formulated instructions on how to create a bootable Linux USB
stick using Windows…

and, once created it is a stand alone operating system on a stick
which can be directly booted on hardware (if the BIOS supports), or
booted and run in any VM which supports Linux (not just a VM running
in Windows, only)…

right? if so, good… but, then i kinda wonder why mention it here
since everyone here has long known how to make the same stick using
Linux or Windows:
http://en.opensuse.org//SDB:Live_USB_stick

and, the version from as far back as 2007:
http://old-en.opensuse.org//Live_USB_stick

or, maybe i’m still confused by what you are doing or why you
posted…but, again i mention i’m not attacking so need not defend…

if you are helping folks discover openSUSE–THANKS… (i don’t even
mind if you make some change off the Windows crowd, everyone else is!)


DenverD
CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD [posted via NNTP w/openSUSE 10.3]

and, once created it is a stand alone operating system on a stick
which can be directly booted on hardware (if the BIOS supports), or
booted and run in any VM which supports Linux (not just a VM running
in Windows, only)…

You are right.

right? if so, good… but, then i kinda wonder why mention it here
since everyone here has long known how to make the same stick using
Linux or Windows:
SDB:Live USB stick - openSUSE

This tutorial is using an alternate method. This method is Raw writing the ISO to your USB stick and that will really mess it up. You will have one partition of the size of your ISO, not readable by Windows. It is even harder to bring your key to its original state (FAT32 partition, full size of the stick) because Windows partition tool is just dumb and will try to recreate a partition of the same size as the old one.

So, in a nutshell :
-> Your USB stick will only be dedicated for LiveUSB purpose (not access to partition)
-> Resizing it to its original size will be a nightmare
-> You will not be able to try it easily in Windows
-> Wiki procedure does not work on Seven

These 4 facts will block 90% of users.

My software is mainly meant to be used by people who never tried Linux but always wanted to. So you are right, i’m trying to help people discover Linux. Bringing it on a plate, as easy as possible for the user.

linuxliveusb wrote:
> My software is mainly meant to be used by people who never tried Linux
> but always wanted to. So you are right, i’m trying to help people
> discover Linux. Bringing it on a plate, as easy as possible for the
> user.

thank you for that!


DenverD
CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD [posted via NNTP w/openSUSE 10.3]

So, will you try it someday ? (You will have to find a Windows computer before :wink: )

linuxliveusb, I just downloaded the program and the latest GParted image (5.4?), as I do use this a lot. I switched to Windows 7 on my dual boot system and used your program to create a USB pen drive GParted (2GB stick with about 700 mb free now) boot disk and it worked like a champ. Thank you so much for the program and good luck in what ever you are doing with this project.

Thank You,

linuxliveusb wrote:
> So, will you try it someday ?

hmmmmmm…

i’ll tell you what i’ll do: you send me the money to buy a retail box
of Win7 in Denmark (where i live) and i’ll load it in a VM and then
use that to build a UBS stick with your work…

so, just send me 755 to 840 Danish Kroner (about: US$ 132 to 147, or
Euro 101 to 113), see current pricing here:
http://www.microsoft.com/danmark/din_virksomhed/koeb_online/operativsystemer.mspx

but warning, maybe while counting your money i’ll change my mind… :wink:


DenverD
CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD [posted via NNTP w/openSUSE 10.3]

Well, I’m not gonna send you money to pay for a Windows just to put OpenSUSE on a stick. But I’m sure one day you will find an opportunity to use my software to show your favourite OS to your friends.

What’s funny in that story is that I’m developing a Windows software to create Linux Live USB sticks when at the same time I’m a Mac user (@ home). Though I’m also using Linux but mostly as my server’s OS.

Hello,

I have a question. At my company I’m going to work with OpenSuse 11.3 via your VirtualBox under Windows XP. OpenSuse will be installed on an USB stick. At the home I have installed OpenSuse 11.3 on my notebook and want to transfer my changes (created files, etc.) to my notebook. What shall I do? Simple put the USB stick and copy all changes to my notebook? Will be LiveUSB well recognized because the installed OS on the my notebook is the same?

Thanks in advance.
Oleg.

right? if so, good… but, then i kinda wonder why mention it here
since everyone here has long known how to make the same stick using
Linux or Windows:
SDB:Live USB stick - openSUSE

DenverD: It seems fair that he brought this to our attention as some users have trouble with unetbootin or dd
Thanks. linuxliveusb

ova2 wrote:
> I have a question. At my company I’m going to work with OpenSuse 11.3
> via your VirtualBox under Windows XP.

hi Ova, the person who began this thread (the same one who and makes
what you are using) wrote in his first post:

I will not do any support in this forum…

…please visit http://www.linuxliveusb.com

Please use the ‘BugTracking system’
(http://www.linuxliveusb.com/en/help-guides/bugs-requests.html)

that is to say, he may or may not ever return to this forum again and
even if he does he should be supporting his product in his forum on
his web site…


DenverD
CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD [posted via NNTP w/openSUSE 10.3]
When it comes to chocolate, resistance is futile.

You should try a solution like Dropbox or any other solution working on OpenSUSE. It will let you share files very easily between your home and your work. Other solution : have another USB key or disk to work from and save everything on it.

PS: DenverD is right, please prefer the BugTracking system or contact form to contact me as I will not watch this thread forever.

PS2: I tried with OpenSUSE 11.3 Network edition and it seems to work too (but i need some feedbacks to confirm).