Tea-Time Thread

Hi there.

As i see some of you prefer tea over coffee, let me just say i just had a cup of this brew after a looooong time:

http://www.food-info.net/images/rooibos2.gif + http://www.luxury-thailand-travel.com/images/Dried-Lemongrass.JPG =

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pWqPQQ1PL.jpg

Yummie :slight_smile:

It has a slight warming sensations, lacks almost all caffeine, so i like to drink it before sleep. You?

Regards,

On 2014-09-29 21:26, holden87 wrote:

> It has a slight warming sensations, lacks almost all caffeine, so i like
> to drink it before sleep. You?

I have a concoction in front of the keyboard, that I’m drinking now
before going to bed, and I have no idea what it is made of. Two bags,
two concoctions, actually.

I just grabbed them both from the supermarket stand. One labelled
antistress, the other sleepwell or something. One day, time permitting
(ie, at normal sopping hours) I’ll go to the herbalist shop and buy a
good one from him.

On the other hand… those develop critters inside the glass jars…
turns me around to something else to drink.

That’s what happens with “natural” produce. They are too natural for me
sometimes. I don’t like extra protein with my tea… I prefer the
protein types I buy in the supermarket properly labelled and treated.

:wink:


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

What is it?

Me, I generally drink decaf instant coffee but on the rare occasions I can be bothered to make it, perhaps my favourite brew is a cup of strong Assam tea. I have it with milk but the colour is still pretty dark. Possibly all the things you would like to avoid but it tastes great!

Never heard/tried Assam, will look into it, might be the thing for helping me replace my morning coffee :slight_smile:

The pictures above are rooibos + lemon grass :slight_smile:

Yesterday, i tried what the store clerk in Egypt referred to as ‘Bedouin tea’. It’s basically black tea with some added fruit pieces and flower petals. :slight_smile:

Thanks for the info. I’ve not tried anything like that but maybe one day.

I wouldn’t have a clue about getting tea elsewhere in the world but over here (UK), Twinings is a respected old brand.

There is a shop about 10 miles from me that seems to stock most of their range and others, plus (and I really love cheese) they have a wonderful cheese counter. The only thing wrong with it is you would need a fairly hefty bank balance to do your weekly shopping there. Nice place for the occasional treat though.

On 2014-10-04 11:56, Jon Freeman wrote:
>
> Thanks for the info. I’ve not tried anything like that but maybe one
> day.
>
> I wouldn’t have a clue about getting tea elsewhere in the world but over
> here (UK), ‘Twinings’
> (http://www.twinings.co.uk/tea/black-tea/assam-loose-tea-125g) is a
> respected old brand.

I know Twinings, probably my preferred brand. Here, Spain, I can easily
find the breakfast and Earl Grey kind in tins, and some times in cardbox
refills. Other kinds, if at all available, in bags, and some tins. And
not really cheap.

> There is a shop about 10 miles from me that seems to stock most of their
> range and others, plus (and I really love cheese) they have a wonderful
> cheese counter. The only thing wrong with it is you would need a fairly
> hefty bank balance to do your weekly shopping there. Nice place for the
> occasional treat though.

:slight_smile:


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

I think (well not really but…) I’d be happier drinking Eau de Cologne than Earl Grey!

That said, you have reminded me of some time back in the 60s when I was a child. It think it was a Christmas present but for some reason, my parents were given four tins of (I seem to remember Jackson’s of Picaddilly on them) loose tea. Memory suggests they were labelled Earl Grey, English Breakfast, Darjeeling and Orange Peokoe. I thought at the time the Orange Pekoe was the best tea I’d ever tasted.

Drifting a long way from tea, but thinking of sampling things, I remember just a few years ago being given a box of chocolates. I’ve not found it since but it was a box of sort of disc shaped chocolates with very high (I think up to 90%) concentrations and from different countries. I decided that Venezuelan chocolate was the best in the world, so rich and almost fruity and melt in your mouth… Just mentioning it as it can be nice on occasion to have sort of side by side comparisons to try.

And another drift. Does any one here drink any of the other hot beverages?

I’ve never been fond of the so called “drinking chocolates” but as a kid, I used to sometimes make myself a cup of (Cadbury’s Bourneville) cocoa. Used to heat it in a pan with milk and warm it up slowly. Horlicks and Ovaltine would be other sort of “blasts from the past” for me.

Milky coffee was another one. Used to heat a pan of milk up and pour it into (say) a cup with some Nescaffe blend 37 coffee in.

Nowadays with me, all to often things have to be sort of instant, just boil the kettle and job done… Maybe I’m missing out on some things from my own laziness…

On Sun, 05 Oct 2014 02:36:01 GMT
Jon Freeman <Jon_Freeman@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

>
> And another drift. Does any one here drink any of the other hot
> beverages?
>
> I’ve never been fond of the so called “drinking chocolates” but as a
> kid, I used to sometimes make myself a cup of (Cadbury’s Bourneville)
> cocoa. Used to heat it in a pan with milk and warm it up slowly.
> Horlicks and Ovaltine would be other sort of “blasts from the past”
> for me.

I usually find “blasts from the past” turn out to be damp squibs.
Sometimes it’s because your tastes change as you get older but it can
also be that the make-up of the product has changed.

In the first bracket, I think, is Bournville Drinking Chocolate which I
tried a couple of decades ago when I couldn’t get a decent-sized tin of
cocoa and, after one tasting, took it into work and gave it to someone
who liked the muck. Far too sweet!

I made the same mistake with a bar of Bournville plain chocolate as I
loved that at a kid. Again, far too sweet and sickly. I nowadays get
milk chocolate that has more cocoa in it than Bournville Plain.

In the second bracket are products that have changed owners. I used to
like Crawfords Cheddars, a small cracker with a strong cheesy flavour.
For some reason, I went for years without buying any but then I saw
some in my local shop so bought a packet. I think that after a couple
of biscuits I threw them away. There was no hint of cheese in them;
they were just salty crackers. I checked the packet and saw that it was
no longer Crawford’s but McVitie’s.

A prime example of how takeovers can affect products is the
story of Walker’s Crisps:

It was about forty years ago when I first came across Walker’s.
They did no advertising as they couldn’t keep up with demand created by
word-of-mouth. They were different from Smith’s in that the different
flavours had different flavours whereas Smith’s all tasted the same, as
if they’d been about a decade on the shelf past their sell-by date. One
lunchtime, I was in a pub and a bloke poked head through the doorway
and asked the landlord what crisps he’d got. He replied, “plain, cheese
and onion, salt & vinegar . . .” whereupon he was interrupted and asked
“no, which brand?” “Smith’s”, he replied. “No Walker’s?”, “No.” With
that, the potential customer went away.

Anyway, some years later, I bought a packet of Walker’s crisps and they
were disgusting, just as bad a Smith’s. I checked the label and found
they were now owned but Nabisco, who, funnily enough, also owned
Smith’s.

A few years passed and I heard that Walker’s had been sold off by
Nabisco and were now independent again. I tried them and, although they
weren’t back to their peak, they were much better than under Nabisco.
They then gradually improved until they were back in prime form.

Another few years passed and I noticed that a packet didn’t have the
same flavour as before - though nowhere near as bad as under Nabisco -
and the crisps were no longer crisp but hard and brittle. As before, I
checked the label but it gave no indication of any change of ownership.
Some months later, I found that they had been taken over by Lay’s. I
see that the Americanisation of the firm is now complete with the
launch of their latest product, “Deli Chips”. “Chips”?! They’re crisps
not chips! Bah!


Graham P Davis, Bracknell, Berks.
openSUSE 13.2-m0 (64-bit); KDE 4.14.1; AMD Phenom II X2 550 Processor;
Kernel: 3.16.2; Video: nVidia GeForce 210 (using nouveau driver);
Sound: ATI SBx00 Azalia (Intel HDA)

On Sun, 05 Oct 2014 01:46:01 GMT
Jon Freeman <Jon_Freeman@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

> Drifting a long way from tea, but thinking of sampling things, I
> remember just a few years ago being given a box of chocolates. I’ve
> not found it since but it was a box of sort of disc shaped chocolates
> with very high (I think up to 90%) concentrations and from different
> countries. I decided that Venezuelan chocolate was the best in the
> world, so rich and almost fruity and melt in your mouth… Just
> mentioning it as it can be nice on occasion to have sort of side by
> side comparisons to try.

I’ve just had my delivery of Chocolate Tasting Club’s Excellence
selection and the dark chocolate batons in that box are from
Madagascar: Manjari 64%. Absolutely stunning! More fruit flavour than
you’d find in some fruit-filled chocolates.
http://www.hotelchocolat.com/uk/tasting-club


Graham P Davis, Bracknell, Berks.
openSUSE 13.2-m0 (64-bit); KDE 4.14.1; AMD Phenom II X2 550 Processor;
Kernel: 3.16.2; Video: nVidia GeForce 210 (using nouveau driver);
Sound: ATI SBx00 Azalia (Intel HDA)

On 2014-10-05 04:46, Jon Freeman wrote:
>
> Milky coffee was another one. Used to heat a pan of milk up and pour it
> into (say) a cup with some Nescaffe blend 37 coffee in.
>
> Nowadays with me, all to often things have to be sort of instant, just
> boil the kettle and job done… Maybe I’m missing out on some things
> from my own laziness…

Kettle? That’s a thing from the past!
Just put the cup in the microwave :slight_smile:

Specially for chocolate or milk: they make a mess of the pan to clean up
after boiling. The cup used in the micro is far easier to clean.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

I know what you mean on both counts.

I made the same mistake with a bar of Bournville plain chocolate as I
loved that at a kid. Again, far too sweet and sickly. I nowadays get
milk chocolate that has more cocoa in it than Bournville Plain.

A Bournville chocolate bar used to be something to spend my pocket money on. I’ve not tried one in years.

A prime example of how takeovers can affect products is the
story of Walker’s Crisps: …]

Smiths and the other one was Golden Wonder when I was a kid. I just about go back to the days of the old blue bag.

Oddly enough, a couple of days ago, we were talking to one of the farm workers on the field behind us where they had been harvesting potatoes (I hope btw they do barley again next year - a nice crop to watch growing). He said their crop was destined for Kettle crisps in Norwich. Perhaps if in a few of weeks time I bought a packet I’d get one made with “our very own potatoes”???

On Sun, 05 Oct 2014 12:46:01 GMT
Jon Freeman <Jon_Freeman@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

> Smiths and the other one was Golden Wonder when I was a kid. I just
> about go back to the days of the old blue bag.

I’m afraid I’m old enough to remember when the blue bag was just twisted
by hand to seal it, not crimped by a machine. The crisps also had green
and black patches. Good old days?


Graham P Davis, Bracknell, Berks.
openSUSE 13.2-beta (64-bit); KDE 4.14.1; AMD Phenom II X2 550 Processor;
Kernel: 3.16.3; Video: nVidia GeForce 210 (using nouveau driver);
Sound: ATI SBx00 Azalia (Intel HDA)

[QUOTE=Cloddy;2668032]On Sun, 05 Oct 2014 12:46:01 GMT
Jon Freeman <Jon_Freeman@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

> Smiths and the other one was Golden Wonder when I was a kid. I just
> about go back to the days of the old blue bag.

I’m afraid I’m old enough to remember when the blue bag was just twisted
by hand to seal it, not crimped by a machine. The crisps also had green
and black patches. Good old days?

My old and foggy memory is the twisted bag. I think there was a later attempt to do sealed sachets (as you describe) but they weren’t the same…

Good old days is maybe another thing and I’m not sure where to begin or how at the moment to evaluate. Mother who will be 80 next year was rural Shropsire and will tell me tales of the threshing machine visiting the farms, of her mother’s love of the countryside and what grew there, even of Italian POWS helping on the farms . Fathers’s home was bombed out in WW2 and he lived in a city (Norwich) so I can get very different perspective from those closet to me…

Me, possibly for this post I just say “times change” Funny really the way things go. As an example, I pretty much left mainstream music years ago but do I still have a fondness for say Slade and T Rex…

Of course tea is the best. I prefer green tea on winter with honey and in a small bowl some nuts. It is perfect. On summer Green ice tea with fruits. It is perfect.