systemd and Yast2

I’m sorry to say, but may impression of systemd and actual Yast2 is a sack full of bugs!
I worked with several unix versions 10 years before I touched windows 3.11 for the first time.
I had SuSE 1.0 working on one of my first PCs. OK, I’m a developer, not an Admin, but I had from SLES 1.0 until 11 all versions running on my servers, or in the firms where I worked. Hence I do not setup a server for the first time. But never I wasted so much time as with this version!
Installation of Apache2 with Yast worked. But setting up virtual hosts ended in disaster! Using the Yast http configuration plugin turned the runing http-server into a dead body. After the second try with the same result, I uninstalled apache2, downloaded apache 2.4 from the apache site, built it an configured it. This versions works now, but startup on server boot was a nightmare! No mean to start or stop with service script! Downgrading to runlevel manager ended in all yast-modules being dead. I had to force an upgrade of all of them. Finally, I did a manual configuration of run-levels as I did in the early 1980! This worked! But somehow behind in an nontransparent manner the runlevel configuration was transformed to services. I don’t like that!
Tomcat was even worse! Tomcat installed from Yast never ran! mod-jk had to be downloaded and built from source, as the delivered so doesn’t work.
On doing a manual start or stop of an application server is a kind of hazard game! Does it stop or start, you never know. You must verify with the ps command. Sometimes a had to stop or start from the terminal using the manual command to get the desired result!
I’m old, but I’m still open for new things. But the new must be better. If I must waste my time with a sack full of bugs like systemd, I’m sorry, I say just give me back the old run level starting! My Servers are up for month, so I don’t care if startup takes 5 minutes or an hour. I care only if it works or not!
Beside: Having so much troubles, I tried to install SLES 12-sp2 on a virtual machine, just to see if the same problems exist. No chance, the installation crashed with some internal error!

Is there an actual question here??

On 02/10/2016 07:56 AM, juerg wrote:
>
> I’m sorry to say, but may impression of systemd and actual Yast2 is a
> sack full of bugs!

It may be a better use of your time, as a developer, to bring the issues
here to troubleshoot them, if you have not done so already ( see you have
a thread on glassfish along with this one).

> Installation of Apache2 with Yast worked. But setting up virtual hosts
> ended in disaster! Using the Yast http configuration plugin turned the

Yast has never been fantastic about doing more than an initial setup of
Apache httpd, unfortunately, and it is pretty easy to break Apache httpd
using it after the initial setup. With that said, doing the initial setup
including virtual hosts usually works, and the system is usually reliable
(I’ve done it a lot) as long as you then modify things manually using the
/etc/sysconfig/apache2 file or other configuration files under
/etc/apache2 as you would with any other installation (and as you probably
did with your manual installation).

> runing http-server into a dead body. After the second try with the same
> result, I uninstalled apache2, downloaded apache 2.4 from the apache
> site, built it an configured it. This versions works now, but startup on
> server boot was a nightmare! No mean to start or stop with service

Using a traditional service script should work, but Apache httpd doesn’t
focus on creating perfect init scripts for openSUSE the way openSUSE does.
Also, backward compatibility is still using systemd, and things are
different with systemd, but in a lot of ways it is better. I’ll give an
example below.

> script! Downgrading to runlevel manager ended in all yast-modules being
> dead. I had to force an upgrade of all of them. Finally, I did a manual

Holy cow!!!

> configuration of run-levels as I did in the early 1980! This worked! But
> somehow behind in an nontransparent manner the runlevel configuration
> was transformed to services. I don’t like that!
> Tomcat was even worse! Tomcat installed from Yast never ran! mod-jk had
> to be downloaded and built from source, as the delivered so doesn’t
> work.

After all you have changed, I’m surprised your system boots, personally,
and having changed the entire base system all bets on depending software
are, in my opinion, off.

> On doing a manual start or stop of an application server is a kind of
> hazard game! Does it stop or start, you never know. You must verify with

My example of how systemd can help is here. With the sys-v system things
are as you describe them. Does it start? Does it stop? Did it crash
somewhere in between? With systemd as a sort of wrapper rather than just
something that kicks off an init script and hopes for the best, you can
very easily do a check to see the actual status of a command, see the
actual output of its startup (days/weeks/months/years later) and even have
systemd auto-restart it if/when it crashes (for whatever reason), maybe
after a delay of seconds/minutes just in case that’s helpful. This is all
done in pretty simple service files, rather than complicated init scripts
and cron jobs and PID files. Better? In some ways, yes.
More-complicated, usually not, but different and unfamiliar to those of us
who have been doing this for more than half of our lives.

> the ps command. Sometimes a had to stop or start from the terminal using
> the manual command to get the desired result!
> I’m old, but I’m still open for new things. But the new must be better.
> If I must waste my time with a sack full of bugs like systemd, I’m
> sorry, I say just give me back the old run level starting! My Servers
> are up for month, so I don’t care if startup takes 5 minutes or an hour.
> I care only if it works or not!

While you’re not alone in feeling this way, it may be worth mentioning
that finding Linux distributions that are planning to hand onto sys-v
perpetually is hard. Still, the joy of FOSS, and Linux in particular, is
that you can roll your own, though that means a lot of hard work. Clearly
you are up to that task, but I think most people’s time, and maybe yours
too, would be better spent picking a distro and then starting a thread on
a particular issue to see if others can duplicate it or help resolve it.

> Beside: Having so much troubles, I tried to install SLES 12-sp2 on a

There is no such thing as SLES 12 SP2 at this point in time; was it a
beta, or did you mean SP1 which came out a month or two ago, or did you
use openSUSE 12.2?

> virtual machine, just to see if the same problems exist. No chance, the
> installation crashed with some internal error!

Be sure to check your installation media. I’ve never had an “internal
error” installing openSUSE or SLES unless I downloaded an ISO that was
corrupt, or then burned an ISO to media and having it somehow become
corrupt. In a virtual environment I’d expect fewer errors because the
“hardware” is generalized, so less likely to have driver problems.


Good luck.

If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
show your appreciation and click on the star below…

Indeed. Can the OP please identify which need for technical help he has? Else this will be better placed in General Chitchat.

This will be moved to Chitchat and is CLOSED for the moment.

Moved from Install/Boot/Login and open again.