System not using the SWAP

I just installed the latest version of opensuse and I just put the RAM and SWAP widget on. I can see the ram meter is working fine but the swap space is always 0. How do I activate the swap so it starts using that space?

/sbin/swapon -s

will tell you about your swap.

You do not tell how many RAM you have, but when it is any decent amount swap will not be used. Be glad.

EDIT: I see this is your first post. WELCOME to these Forums. Hope they are usefull and enjoy.

filename type size used Priority
/dev/sda5 partition 4.1 GB 0 -1

that is what it desplays. how do I get my system to use it?

Thanks.

Linux loads everything to ram cache
It’ll hardly ever touch swap on most modern machines

if you have your system running all day. Look at the ram use, it looks like it’s in use, but it’s not. Many users get confused by this. There is a way to adjust swapiness, but I’m not sure it’s really necessary.

The swap doesn’t have to be used; it’s not unusual if the system is using no swap space. That means that your computer has enough RAM that swap is not needed. Swap is much slower as compared to normal RAM, so it’s a good thing none is being used.

So the only way would be to remove some RAM from your computer. :stuck_out_tongue:

ok that helps a lot thank you guys.

When you see the above as an answer to what I said, I miss the size of your RAM. Also when you have computer output to display, please use CODE tags around it (slect the text and click the # button in the tool bar) to make it the inspoiled output of the compter:

filename               type               size            used            Priority
/dev/sda5            partition          4.1 GB           0                     -1

I do not quite understand why you are so fond of using your swap (most people are glad when the system does not). You could try to run more and bigger programs (especialy in the background) until the system starts swapping. Or take memory out (as suggested above). Whatever is easier.

caf4926 wrote:

>
> Linux loads everything to ram cache
> It’ll hardly ever touch swap on most modern machines

Sure it will. Just run enough processes to use up your real memory, and
Linux too will start paging/swapping.


Per Jessen, Zürich (27.1°C)

Just donate all but one of your RAM sticks to me. :slight_smile:

Incidentally you can simulate less memory using mem= on the kernel command line, if you really want to know how your machine feels with less RAM.

As other have said, it’s good that swap is not used, so enjoy.

hcvv wrote:

>
> edwardcode;2182150 Wrote:
>> filename type size used
>> Priority
>> /dev/sda5 partition 4.1 GB 0
>> -1
>>
>>
>> that is what it desplays. how do I get my system to use it?
>>
>>
>> Thanks.
> When you see the above as an answer to what I said, I miss the size of
> your RAM. Also when you have computer output to display, please use CODE
> tags around it (slect the text and click the # button in the tool bar)
> to make it the inspoiled output of the compter:
Was just reading this and thought I would learn something new, but I cannot
find a # sign on the tools bar. Even looked in config toolbar for adding
function. Nothing adds # sign function. How do i do this as it would be real
handy.

openSUSE 11.3 RC1
KDE 4.4.4 knode 4.4.5
Thanks.

upscope

From your post I guess you use the NTTP interface. I am afraid those niceties are not for you then.

Hi
If using nntp you need to manually add the tags eg CODE with and ]
along with a / to finish eg;


Paste some code/text


Cheers Malcolm °¿° (Linux Counter #276890)
SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 11 (x86_64) Kernel 2.6.32.12-0.7-default
up 3 days 22:33, 3 users, load average: 0.00, 0.03, 0.00
GPU GeForce 8600 GTS Silent - Driver Version: 256.35

The memory size was there. The system has 2 GB of RAM and a 2 GB swap
partition with no swap being used. Everything is normal. If you want to
test if swap will be used, then load up the system, or write a program
that mallocs memory and never frees it.