Suse 12.3 - Authorization required to mount DVD

When I insert a dvd into my home PC and then select it with Dolphin or Handbrake I get a popup that says “Authorization is required to mount…” and I must furnish the root password. This works. When it’s time to eject the same dvd it demands the root password again.

This is a genuine pain in the neck. What do I need to do in order to use a DVD without having to type in a password?

Try Yast>Users and group management>Edit>Details>Additional groups>cdrom

BTW it is openSUSE 12.3 and you should be moving to 13.2. (SUSE is the enterprise distribution.)

A long time since I used openSUSE 12.3, though I did find an old thread reporting similar

https://forums.opensuse.org/showthread.php/484600-root-authorization-to-mount-CD-ROM-USB-stick-and-shutdown-and-no-SB-Audigy-Alsa-Mixer-in-SuSE12-3

I would be inclined to check the local security setting via YaST > Security and Users or the setting in /etc/sysconfig/security for the ‘PERMISSION_SECURITY=’ entry.

PERMISSION_SECURITY="easy local"

http://www.softpanorama.org/Commercial_linuxes/Suse/Security/chkstat_and_permissions_files.shtml

There are polkit settings which can be adjusted too if necessary. (We can explore further if the above advice doesn’t resolve.)

https://doc.opensuse.org/documentation/html/openSUSE_113/opensuse-security/cha.security.policykit.html

Not sure if this is helpfull or not to this specific circumstance, but:

I still am running 12.3 on a few machines, have never run into that problem.

Me neither. I was always a member of the ‘cdrom’ group (for access to /dev/sr0), and have a reasonable working knowledge of polkit privileges anyway - not that I’ve had to adjust for that particular issue.

… of course, when the machine can be physically accessed by several people, the system can be set up in ways to prevent unauthorized copying of information from it, or loading unauthorized information, files, or programs onto it.

But, that would manifest itself in other ways, as well. Not only would you need root privileges to mount CDs/DVDs (blank or otherwise), you would face the same restriction when mounting external drives, USB keys, Bluetooth devices, and SD Cards/Card Readers.

If, any time in the past, the OP ever ran a utility to provide this added security, that could account for this problem.

Thanks.
I tried this yesterday but it did not work.

YaST was the answer.
I went to my openSUSE YaST/Security Center and Hardening/Local Security Configuration and switched from “custom settings” to “home workstation” and the problem went away.
I recall using the optical drive in the past without needing root pw to mount it but something must have changed due to either a side-effect from some upgrade or a personal blunder, prolly the latter.

Thanks to all responders.

PS: When I get my new machine (soon) I will switch to 13.2.

Good to know that was the fix. I seem to recall it affected a an umber of users when 12.3 was current.

PS: When I get my new machine (soon) I will switch to 13.2.

Good idea :slight_smile:

Pleased to hear that. When deano mentioned that, I was already convinced that would be your answer.

PS: When I get my new machine (soon) I will switch to 13.2.

I have several machines in a few locations running 12.3 (not all mine, some are friends and so forth) that I am going to have to go around switching, something I am not very happy about.

Not that I have anything against 13.1 or 13.2, simply that they are all running flawlessly and have been for quite some time under 12.3, and I do not look forward to having to do all that re-installing on all those machines for no reason other than the arbitrary EOL headache.>:)

I hope you’re recognised for your time/effort/knowledge involved with supporting these people. :slight_smile:

Having said that, I gave an old ThinkPad (with openSUSE 13.1, KDE) to my younger brother, (and support is free). He mentioned that as a regular user, he hardly even aware that he’s using Linux, and more comfortable about security when online.

Oh, yes indeed, I am. Some of them are non-profit community support organizations (food banks, volunteer organizations, organizations to help seniors, low-income, and homeless people, and so forth). They all appreciate it immensely, I get great recognition and respect (although those are not my true goals, I just like what these people do and want to contribute the way I can best contribute), I wind up with free restaurant meals, good friendships, and an ongoing list of non-financial personal benefits, not the least of which is the satisfaction I feel for having done something worthy.

It is a great way to spend retirement.

Having said that, I gave an old ThinkPad (with openSUSE 13.1, KDE) to my younger brother, (and support is free). He mentioned that as a regular user, he hardly even aware that he’s using Linux, and more comfortable about security when online.

… same here, with most of my installs for others. Plus, they do notice greater stability (they just use it, not have to fight with it) and most often much snappier performance.

Fantastic! I happen to live in a community with a large number of senior citizens, and there is a local computer club that provides training and support for members. I’ve been meaning to find time to make contact and register my interest in providing Linux support (assuming that they’d be interested).

Find some companies or people disposing of slightly older computers, set them up with openSUSE with an interface that is familiar to anyone who has used Windows in the past, then donate those PCs to the organizations, or to individual fixed-income or low-income seniors (you can probably find out who would want and most benefit from them at that computer club, for example, or through the help organizations).

That would be a good way to start.:slight_smile:

Yes, I was thinking along those lines. I’ll give it some thought.

It will take up some of your time, but I have always found that if you need something done, go to a truly busy person. They always seem to find the time …

BTW: 2 years ago, for example, I set up one old fellow, a very depressed senior, in just that way. He was one of those “You will never get me anywhere near one of those stupid things!” guys. I set him up with openSUSE, for e-mail and Facebook, and connected him to family he had not seen nor communicated with in a couple of decades. He now spends anywhere from 3 to 7 hours a day on Facebook communicating with family, old long-lost friends, and now many new friends. The change in him is remarkable: Much happier, much more pleasant.:slight_smile: