SUSE 11.3 Wont Start After PC Reboot

Hello,

I recently installed open SUSE 11.3 on my computer which I built myself and the problem I have is after rebooting the computer, I get a black screen. It will not boot the operating system.
Here is my component specification:
Video Card: BFG GeForce 8800GTX 768MB 384-bit GDDR3 PCI Express
Motherboard: DFI LP DK 790FX-M2RS AM2+/AM2
CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 955 Black Edition 3.2GHz
Memory: CORSAIR XMS2 4GB (4 x 1GB) DDR2 800 (PC2 6400)
HD: Western Digital Caviar SE16 320GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s

Another question is, where can I purchase SUSE 11.3 and if I do purchase, will I get help on the phone installing it ? Pleas keep in mind that I have little experience with SUSE Linux.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Could you describe the current behaviour a bit more precisely?

Does your machine run the BIOS okay? Does a bootloader appear? Does the choice you made in the bootloader load anything? If so, where does it stop? Are you sure it’s not only your graphics which are failing to start (command line login prompt appears)?

Pachlus asks:

… where can I purchase SUSE 11.3 and if I do purchase, will I get help on the phone installing it ? Pleas keep in mind that I have little experience with SUSE Linux.
If you desire, you can buy a copy of openSUSE at the following link:

Buy openSUSE - openSUSE

The purchase will be appreciated, but we will be happy to help you here.

I recently installed open SUSE 11.3 on my computer which I built myself and the problem I have is after rebooting the computer, I get a black screen. It will not boot the operating system.
Your computer looks fine for running openSUSE 11.3. When you say you get a black screen, is that all. By that I mean, does the Grub Boot Menu appear, allowing you to select openSUSE, but then the screen goes blank, or is the screen just blank, never showing anything? Further, did this computer come with Windows and if so, does it still work. Is this computer just a blank pile of junk after you installed openSUSE, or is there some kind of life still present?

If the boot menu comes up, but then goes blank after selecting openSUSE, then I am going to suggest you use the kernel load option, nomodeset. You just type nomodeset at the default prompt in the Grub menu and press enter before 8 seconds goes by. This should allow you to see something as openSUSE loads. At which time, we can tell you how to load the nVidia driver for your video card.

If your PC is just blank, but does try to boot, you need to attempt to reload openSUSE and make sure if you have more than one hard drive that the BIOS is booting from the drive you installed openSUSE on to.

Thank You,

Here are the answers to your questions:
*When I reboot, the screen is just blank showing no options.
* I built the computer from scratch. I am running windows 7. It is running properly. When I install OpenSuse everything runs fine. I was able to do updates but once I restart the computer then it would not boot back to Opensuse.
* Is it possible to install nVidia driver if I install OpenSuse? Is there any instruction how to install nVidia drivers in the simplest way?
Thank you for all your help!

Pachlus Here are the answers to your questions:
*When I reboot, the screen is just blank showing no options.
* I built the computer from scratch. I am running windows 7. It is running properly. When I install OpenSuse everything runs fine. I was able to do updates but once I restart the computer then it would not boot back to Opensuse.
* Is it possible to install nVidia driver if I install OpenSuse? Is there any instruction how to install nVidia drivers in the simplest way?
Thank you for all your help!
From your response, it is not clear to me just what you can do with your PC right now. Based on this line, your PC no longer boots anything. Is that correct?

*When I reboot, the screen is just blank showing no options.

When this occurs, we can assume that either A) the Master Boot Record (MBR) is no longer working OR, B) no partition is marked active OR, C) the active partition can no longer boot. It is hard to believe that there is NO output at all. Normally, there is a boot error message of some sort.

I would boot from the openSUSE disk and see if it can be reloaded one more time. I might boot from my Windows CD and see if it can restore Windows into booting. If you can not boot from a CD, then you have a hardware failure for some reason. If no disk can be found, it may have failed or perhaps came unplugged.

Thank You,

First I installed OpenSuse with Windows 7 (dual booth). The installtion went smooth and I was able to work in the operating system. Once I shut down or reset the computer, I am not able to get back to the operating system. There is an error on display that says “error loading operating sysyem”. I installed Opensuse on a seperate hard drive avoiding dual booth and the problem remains. I was able to get to the opensuse by updating the system through the installation cd and I was able to install nVdia drivers and then restart and the problem remained. I was able to boot into the sytem through installation cd update. The nvida drivers are working. After reset, I was getting a black screen again. Now I am back again in operating system through installtion cd updates and I was trying to perform updates through updater applet but I was getting errors and I restarted computer the computer but the problem still remains. I am switching SATA cable between hard drives to get back to windows 7. Hope that helps.

Thank uo

If you are trying to load openSUSE on to an external hard drive, here are some things to think about. This is a reprint from another message I wrote in the forum. You normally must modify the booting section of openSUSE when it is installed in order to run openSUSE from an external hard drive. The changes you make will cause the device.map and menu.lst files to be different from the default. Here is my reprint: So openSUSE and in particular, grub do indeed work properly when ran from an external (or second) hard drive. The issue is really the same for any computer when you decide to boot from a drive that is not the first boot drive. For instance lets say I have a sda and a sdb, sdb is based on hardware to be second, but if I boot from sdb through a BIOS setting or manipulation, grub did not know that when it was installed. If you put grub on the boot drive when it is first or sda, all things work, even if openSUSE is on sdb.

So, what is the problem/fix when you install openSUSE and grub to an external hard drive?

  1. You must be able to select the second hard drive as your booting drive in your BIOS setup for any of this to work.

  2. What ever boot drive you select by any BIOS means is HD0. That is the problem in that if I boot from sdb, then it is HD0.

  3. When you installed openSUSE, you did not boot from the external hard drive, so it was NOT labeled by grub as HD0. openSUSE has no way to even guess what hard you are intended on booting from if it is not the first hard drive!

If it is a new install (no existing partitions on second hard drive) here are the basics I would follow.

  1. Keep the number of partitions at four or below. (Like SWAP (2GB only), / [root] as EXT4, /home as EXT4 & /Software (NTFS or FAT32 so Windows can see it and allow easy file sharing).
  2. Use all Primary Partitions (no logical Ones)
  3. Install a generic Master Boot Record (MBR)
  4. Install Grub in the “/” root partition. Make this the Active or booting partition.
  5. During the install, you must modify the booting section so that the external drive is HD0 in device.map and in the menu.lst file. Assign other hard drives in the remaining hardware order.
  6. I highly suggest you create a separate partition for /home as it is helpful anytime you reinstall openSUSE to maintain.
  7. I would make any forth partition compatible with Windows, such as FAT32 or NTFS. The openSUSE Partitioner can not create a NTFS partition. As long as there are only four partitions total, you can create the NTFS BEFORE you install openSUSE. Just leave 80 GB or so NOT partitioned and free or you can come back later and add a NTFS or FAT32 partition. However, it will not be added automatically to your fstab file if it does not exist when you install openSUSE.
  8. When you install openSUSE and Grub on an external hard drive, you only need to remove the external hard drive for Windows to boot normally. Further, as long as the Windows drive is normal, you can load any Windows service pack without error by simply removing the external hard drive.

That is it in a nutshell. Do the above and it will work like a champ. Be for warned that you are trying to NOT install anything on your normal boot drive. Make sure that the booting section is setup just as I say above. Make a backup of any Windows partitions you can not save or restore.

That is the end of the reprint… You must make changes to your BIOS setting to boot the external drive first, you must modify the disk order so that the external drive is listed first when installing openSUSE and thus it becomes HD0, and when you do this, the grub menu.lst file will be modified as well. In a case where you where disconnecting one drive and making another first, you could make a manual edit as root to theses two files and change all HD0 to HD1 and all HD1 to HD0 and you might have a booting drive. Consider that once you make this change, the drive must be second (running with two drives) and your BIOS must be set to boot the second drive first. The edit commands would be:

kdesu kwrite /boot/grub/device.map

kdesu kwrite /boot/grub/menu.lst

Thank You,

Thanks for the response, first of all I would like clarify that the HD is internal. And yes for installation I had boot from cd first and then after installation I changed to boot from HD. The reason I m switching cables between is to have simple installation of OS on my PC. On Main board I connect HD1 to SATA 1 and loaded windows 7 then I disconnect the SATA 1 cable from HD1 and connect SATA1 to another HD2 and that’s were I loaded opensuse, to avaoid dual boot. The reason being, I wanted to resolve the issue with opensuse and find the reason why is not booting and then worry about dual boot. And if I load dual boot I m able to select which operating system to load, between windows 7, open suse and safe open suse, but I’m only able to get to windows 7, if I select opensuse or safe suse then is back to the same problem.

Thank you,

So when you have both hard drives connected, only Windows will load and when you connect only the openSUSE drive, openSUSE will boot. If these statements are true, then your solution was in my last message, which does not mean it is easy to understand as you need to understand a lot of things to make it work. I can say that openSUSE can be made to work as a dual boot operating system, but if you don’t want to keep swapping cables and you don’t want to load openSUSE partly on the first or Windows drive, then your only solution outside of cable swapping is in my last message. Just let me know if you want to go any further. I would read through my previous message more than once and I would ask specific questions about what was said. But you got to think about it and I just don’t understand it is not going to help here.

Thank You,

First of all, switching cable in multiboot situations creates more problems than it provides solutions. If your computer boots directly in Windows after restart, that’s just because you installed Linux without setting the bootflag on the Grub partition, so the Windows partition remains active and the generic bootcode in MBR pass control to it or someone or somebody - like a makeactive command in Grub menu - did reactivate the Windows parition.

You should install Grub in the MBR of whatever is your first harddrive and both Linux and Windows will boot fine. Since Windows occasionally overwrites the MBR - actually not, only if recover/reinstall it - you should also install Grub either in the Linux root partition if it’s a primary one, otherwise in the extended partition, or even better, in both partitions. Having the grub bootloader (stage1) in several bootsectors doesn’t hurt anybody. The only place where you should never install it in the Windows boot partition.

Dualboot is not more complicated than single boot or triple boot. Grub doesn’t care how many entries it has in its boot menu. Some pople have quite a lot. Look at that guy : Unable to boot CentOS 5.5 with SUSE 11.3 grub . As soon as a partition contains a valid bootcode, is set as (the only) active if needed, and is able to find its boolader and system files, it will boot, whether it’s called Windows 7 or MS DOS 6.0.

Thank you all for the response, this is little bit more complicated than I thought. Hopefully the next generation of SUSE will work, install smother.

Thank you,