sudo no longer works after changes of file permissions

A minor miracle!
I used the two commands in reverse order and rebooted: no success. Then I realized that I had forgotten to re-try also chkstat with reverse order, which gave the usual output. But then I also used rpm again in the previous order, chkstat and rebooted: voila, I can start YAST again from the startmenue! I can also use the command su, but sudo still complains that mark is not in the sudoers-file, just as before.

I must say that I am already very happy about the development.

As already mentioned in a previous post, I have looked at the sudoers file and the user name is in fact not in there. Then I was told that it might be not necessary to include it. Would you suggest that I should try this now?

Yes, that’s probably the easiest solution.

Unless you like the challenge to find out what the problem is and fix it yourself… :wink:

That is still possible.

Yes. I would rather recommend an “Upgrade” installation to the same openSUSE version instead of a fresh install though. This would just reinstall all packages and doesn’t change the system configuration or the set of packages installed.
If that doesn’t help, you still can do a fresh installation afterwards…

Good to hear! :slight_smile:

As already mentioned in a previous post, I have looked at the sudoers file and the user name is in fact not in there. Then I was told that it might be not necessary to include it. Would you suggest that I should try this now?

No, it is normally not necessary to add your user there. Otherwise it wouldn’t work at all on a default installation… :wink:

Probably it got changed somehow though?
Try to delete it and reinstall the package sudo to get the defaults:

rm /etc/sudoers
zypper in -f sudo

(it is a config file, so just reinstalling the package will NOT touch it)

I agree. It depends on what theOP wants. Getting his system functioning asap and being pretty sure that none of his actions left any relics, or trying to repair as a learning case. But doing the latter requires IMHO that he is understanding exactly what he did wrong in the first place, else he will never understand why he repaired what and how. And that will nullify the “learning”.

Guys, you are great!
Removing and re-installing the configuration file resolved even the last problem with sudo. As far as I can see everything is back to normal.

Many thanks to everyone who had helped! The support and expertise in this forum is really outstanding.

As for the learning effect: this situation has certainly taught me something, namely not to execute any idea out of convoluted processes in my mind that seems to make my life easier. To be honest changing the permissions in the directory wasn’t a by accident but deliberation. What can I say: I never really work with these things. But when a problem occurs I try and fiddle, not always with the desired result.

Yes, default openSUSE sudoers contains

Defaults targetpw   # ask for the password of the target user i.e. root
ALL    ALL=(ALL) ALL   # WARNING! Only use this together with 'Defaults targetpw'!

… definitely the best way to learn and to understand the system.:slight_smile: