sudo in openSUSE, is it possible to make it work like ubuntu?

Okay here is a question I wanted to ask for a bit n w since diving into openSUSE.
I noticed that it uses both sudo and root commands and that it uses two passwords, one for root and one for users.
Okay fine I can live with that, but I many want to give openSUSE to someone in my family who may not want to deal with administration and user passwords at the same time.
Currently she is using Ubuntu 12.04 and while has gotten a little used to Unity I am thinking of switching them up to KDE due to its similarities to windows xp.
Now I could run her on Kubuntu as she is familiar with ubuntu but I may want to try them on openSUSE due to my personal experiences with it (as Kubuntu can be rather clunky)
One password they are used to, but two?
I am not sure if she will react well to that.
I mean here is a person who has used Win XP as their primary OS for years but with XP on its death bed (the bed that eats) she is unsure if going to windows 7 will be any good for her (she has no interest in 8, she tried it and it confuses her)
So yeah I am wondering if its possible to disable root and make openSUSE use sudo as its administration backend.
Now yes I am well aware of the issues facing sudo if I do this, but sudo’s probable insecurities never bothered me on my buntu days.
I am aware i am doing this on my own risk and the risk of someone else but I dont want to scare them off.
I dont need any litany on the failings of sudo, I am aware of the risks and willing to take them.
its just a matter of knowing how.

Hi
During the install, the first user you add can be the ‘Admin’ if not then follow this;
https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Administer_with_sudo

You should see an option when installing from both DVDS and LIve ISOs about using the same password for “root” as well as the "new"user you are creating.

On 03/26/2013 06:06 AM, MadmanRB wrote:
> I noticed that it uses both sudo and root commands and that it uses two
> passwords, one for root and one for users.

i would suggest that if you were to do her administrative tasks, then
she would never need the root password (so never need two passwords)
and would therefore never be so unlucky as to trash her system
accidentally…

sure, she could still trash her home…

by the way, there are some differences between how openSUSE and
Ubuntu uses sudo and root, you can learn about those and other
differences here: http://tinyurl.com/ubuntu-to-openSUSE


dd
http://tinyurl.com/DD-Caveat

Well yes that does work for first install, not when the user changes passwords :smiley:

I have done this during setup myself, but its not permanant as once the users password is change the roots remains the same
Unless thats changed, usually I just separate the roots password anyway in openSUSE as I know from previous releases the root and user passwords will be different anyhow.

We always have the option of changing both at the same time :wink:

Huh, you sure?
Via commandline or YAST I imagine, I usually change the roots password via YAST

sudo passwd root
su -c 'passwd root'

What i meant was when you change one(user’s) of them , you can change the other one (root)too.
I don’t think we can change both in a single shot.

Yeah thats what I am stabbing at, I was just wondering if it was possible to work openSUSE to be a little more like Ubuntu in sharing the roots password and users password even if the user changes their password.
If this isnt possible, well okay I can live with it but I may gave my family member Kubuntu or netrunner.
I have used both, I may give her Kubuntu 12.04 as its LTS.

This is not real contribution to this discussion, but what I understand from you telling about Ubunto, I am glad I am not using it. You describe some major security flaws (and I consider the offer to use the same password for root and the first end-user created by the installer, also to be one)…

In any case, when you want it like Ubuntu: use Ubuntu.

When you want it like Windows: use Windows.

Am 26.03.2013 10:26, schrieb MadmanRB:
> a little more like Ubuntu in sharing the roots password and users
> password even if the user changes their password.

This is definitely NOT what ubuntu does, the sole difference is that
sudo is set on ubuntu to use the users password instead of the root
password.

From what I remember of top of my head just run visudo as root and look
for the line with targetpw and delete or comment it, then openSUSE will
also use the users password instead of roots password when sudo is called.


PC: oS 12.3 x86_64 | i7-2600@3.40GHz | 16GB | KDE 4.10.0 | GTX 650 Ti
ThinkPad E320: oS 12.3 x86_64 | i3@2.30GHz | 8GB | KDE 4.10.0 | HD 3000
HannsBook: oS 12.3 x86_64 | SU4100@1.3GHz | 2GB | KDE 4.10.0 | GMA4500

Am 26.03.2013 11:36, schrieb hcvv:
>
> This is not real contribution to this discussion, but what I understand
> from you telling about Ubunto, I am glad I am not using it.
Ubuntu cannot have the same root pw as the user as the root account is
completely disabled by default.


PC: oS 12.3 x86_64 | i7-2600@3.40GHz | 16GB | KDE 4.10.0 | GTX 650 Ti
ThinkPad E320: oS 12.3 x86_64 | i3@2.30GHz | 8GB | KDE 4.10.0 | HD 3000
HannsBook: oS 12.3 x86_64 | SU4100@1.3GHz | 2GB | KDE 4.10.0 | GMA4500

Yes, just follow the instructions in the /etc/sudoers file as shown below:

Code:----------

In the default (unconfigured) configuration, sudo asks for the root

password.

This allows use of an ordinary user account for administration of a freshly

installed system. When configuring sudo, delete the two

following lines:

Defaults targetpw # ask for the password of the target user i.e. root
ALL ALL=(ALL) ALL # WARNING! Only use this together with ‘Defaults
targetpw’!

Changes should take effect immediately.

Good luck.

Oh yes, the correct asnwer to the original question should have been: Compare sudo configuration between Ubuntu and openSUSE and read the man pages with them.

But IMHO both “deafult” configurations are borked. The Ubuntu one because it denied that Unix/Linux system security is largely based on “no root access to dummys”. The openSUSE one because it degenarates sudo to su. And su is something we already has for many yaesr before sudo was created. Thus why is there sudo in openSUSE which such a default configuration. It furthers the use of sudo when not needed and hodes the real purpose of sudo from people.

But again, these are my personal opinions. Only the first paragraph above is on topic (and consistant with martin_helm’s and ab’s observations).

Here is ubuntus rationale for not using root:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo

Nice, but I do not want it onmy system as the default. And as said, it may be one of the main reason to run openSUSE (and YaST of course). Thus my hint: why not run Ubuntu as you want it the Ubuntu way.

But the real solution is of course: read

man sudo
man sudoers

when you want to grant certain users to be able to execute certain root tasks.

You can of course blindly copy the way Ubunto does it to openSUSE (or vv), but understanding what you are doing will decrease the chance that you introduce a security hoole considarable.

(BTW, I do not understand why they in that link talk about user Root where it should read user root imho).

From what i have seen,all the users created by installation are “standard” users in openSUSE and you cannot probably elevate them to admin level
Are users in Ubuntu in “admin” group?

On 2013-03-26 12:56, hcvv wrote:
> The openSUSE one because it degenarates sudo
> to su. And su is something we already has for many yaesr before sudo was
> created. Thus why is there sudo in openSUSE which such a default
> configuration. It furthers the use of sudo when not needed and hodes the
> real purpose of sudo from people.

If I remember correctly, the comments in the openSUSE sudoers file says
that the “default” configuration is temporary, that the administrator is
supposed to change it after the system is installed.

Thus it is the fault of the administrator :wink:


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)