ssystem shuts down because CPU reached mx. temp using VLC and pulse audio

I have had several times the case that my OpenSuse 12.1 on my Toshiba Satellite laptop, dual core with approx 1.5 GB of RAM instantly shuts down prompting me that it reached max. CPU temp. I Used only VLC and in teh background pulse audio as default. IT hapenned with watching video and listening mp3 only.
Please advise

Thanks,

Veki

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Well, if your system managed to get hot enough to shut down you may want
to consider better-ventilating your computer. I’ve had this happen once
with 12.2 when I put it in an unventilated space and left it idle. It
took a while and the logs clearly showed the temperature increasing
until the system shutdown to prevent damage. Besides a better location,
maybe you need to check your heat dissipation stuff in your computer.

Good luck.
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On 2012-11-13 23:50, ab wrote:
> Well, if your system managed to get hot enough to shut down you may
> want to consider better-ventilating your computer. I’ve had this
> happen once with 12.2 when I put it in an unventilated space and
> left it idle. It took a while and the logs clearly showed the
> temperature increasing until the system shutdown to prevent damage.
> Besides a better location, maybe you need to check your heat
> dissipation stuff in your computer.

I always wondered if previous to that limit situation the OS (the
kernel, rather) can not take measures like slowing down the cpu or
inserting idle ops. :-?


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

THis does not happen with other applications regardless of duration of work of computer. Thus, I can download formany hours files and use Libre Office, etc. and everything works fine. BUt, using VLC with Pulse audio stops computer after 20 -30 minutes.

Yes, but I got message that CPU down and that system is going down and that is all. And that is due to normal playingg mp3 files or watching ordinary movie without any other application openned at tthe time. (i.e. Libre Office, GIMP or so.)

On 11/14/2012 07:36 AM, veki wrote:
> BUt, using VLC with Pulse audio
> stops computer after 20 -30 minutes.

it is a cooling problem…if your machine is over (say) six months old
check the Toshiba site for recommended cleaning frequency for your
machine…do what they say do (probably blow out the cooling channels,
or or or or…or, in extreme cases it might be required to do
more…or maybe just place the laptop on a hard surface (soft surfaces
can BLOCK air intake vents)…


dd

The system works fine for several hours heavy loaded without any problems, but its huts down after 30-40 minutes after playback on mp3 or video in VLC using pulse audio.

You said that (or similar) several times already.

Several people advised you to check the system, open it, look for dust, etc. Now when you refuse to do so and report back and keep answering like the above, both sides can go on forever IMHO.

Hello, I did not say that I refuse. I am just enmphasizing that system works sometimes for a long time beaing heavily loaded without any issue. By the way, my laptop is cleaned mon a regular basis. I am focusing on ceratin situation when it shuts down.
Thus, I expect that someone can direct me to investigate that certain situation instead of repeatedly saying common things neglecting what I stated and focused on.

Thanks,

Veki

Am 14.11.2012 11:26, schrieb hcvv:
> Several people advised you to check the system, open it, look for dust,
> etc. Now when you refuse to do so and report back and keep answering
> like the above, both sides can go on forever IMHO.
>
+1

I read such threads several times and always it is like someone is
complaining about some piece of software which makes the system overheat.

Whatever a software does and whatever is wrong with it (if there is
something wrong at all), even if it drives all cpu cores to 100% load
over hours and also the graphics card - a system which is ok can never
overheat - period (as long as you run it in an environment it was
designed for and not in tropical heat or in a bakery).

If it does the hardware is not ok (dust, fans, sensors … whatever) or
it is a “driver” problem which prevents the cooling system to work the
right way (not spinning up fans for example).

This problem has to be identified and solved not (first step as
diagnostic - cleaning).
Everything else is most likely a side effect and cannot be solved in
the software which seems to produce the crash.


PC: oS 12.2 x86_64 | i7-2600@3.40GHz | 16GB | KDE 4.8.5 | GeForce GT 420
ThinkPad E320: oS 12.2 x86_64 | i3@2.30GHz | 8GB | KDE 4.9.3 | HD 3000
eCAFE 800: oS 11.4 i586 | AMD Geode LX 800@500MHz | 512MB | lamp server

After your initial question (post #1), @ab answered you within the hour with the suggestion to look for dust.
You answered him in post#4, 7 hours later (time enough for looking inside I guess) and there you ignored this advice completely. Not even something like: “thank for the hint, but I clean out regularly”.

As a member I would not go into further conversation with you and attend other, more rewarding, threads. But as a mod I try to give you the advice to answer at least at those points where peolpe try to help you. As long as you do not say that you clean your laptop regularly, nobody in these forums can know. We are not clairvoyant, but depend on the facts given in the discussion.

Even if you think that an advice is “nuts”, then answer to it. Try to explain why you think it is not applicable, or just follow it and report back to satisfy the other. Simply ignoring is the shortest way into no posting to you thread anymore.

On 2012-11-14 11:06, veki wrote:
>
> The system works fine for several hours heavy loaded without any
> problems, but its huts down after 30-40 minutes after playback on mp3 or
> video in VLC using pulse audio.

CPU load can be heavier with video. Obviously it is in your case. Or it
is the GPU if you have one.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

Hello,

The system shuts down by the system. SO , the system recognized high temp. and shuts it down.
BUt, the question is why it overheats only in that context and not in other conctexts.
My laptop is always in teh same place on teh same table with normal room temperature.

It is dual boot machine and such “overheating” never repeats in other operating system even after many hours of work. It never happens in my Open Suse 12.1 except in that context.
It may be that pulse aduo invokes some kernel module which has issue in my case or with driver and that it cause overheating.
But, I am pretty sure that hardware is OK since it works sometimes for 2 days without stopping even more CPU demanding apps.

THanks,

Veki

Am 14.11.2012 12:46, schrieb veki:
> It is dual boot machine and such “overheating” never repeats in other
> operating system even after many hours of work. It never happens in my
> Open Suse 12.1 except in that context.

Ok, if the machine is clean and it does not happen with MS Windows (if
that is what you mean by other) - have you compared just by listening at
least if the fans speed up early enough in Linux or not?
If you have sensors installed and configured you could watch it in a
terminal to see the speed of the fans together with the temperature


watch sensors

while running vlc.


PC: oS 12.2 x86_64 | i7-2600@3.40GHz | 16GB | KDE 4.8.5 | GeForce GT 420
ThinkPad E320: oS 12.2 x86_64 | i3@2.30GHz | 8GB | KDE 4.9.3 | HD 3000
eCAFE 800: oS 11.4 i586 | AMD Geode LX 800@500MHz | 512MB | lamp server

The same happens with playing mp3 without video.

Muchas gracias,

Veki

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I think the long and short of what you are not considering can be
summarized in two points, which we are all trying to help you understand
in different ways.

  1. Software CANNOT cause hardware to do things it is not made to do.
    Software (as Martin Helm pointed out) could drive every CPU core to
    100%, and cause the hard drives to spin and work as hard as possible
    (SSDs don’t spin, but they can still generate a little heat) and cause
    the video card to work really hard, but it can only make all of these
    things happen because the hardware allows it. One may argue that
    software can exploit deficiencies in hardware, or do things that the
    designer did not intend, but regardless of the intent, hardware is made
    to do things and will do only those things.

  2. Audio/Visual media are not the same as documents, spreadsheets, and
    presentations in how the CPU is working. When you listen to music you
    are processing around 30 samples per second as I recall, so the computer
    MUST keep up with that rate. With MP3s the system is also decompressing
    and decoding, probably in stereo, and so if you watch your CPU you’ll
    see it is constantly working on ‘vlc’ and ‘pulseaudio’ stuff because
    those programs are, by your request, always doing something so that the
    computer can meet the needs of your human parts (constant sound and
    video). Video compounds the problem because not only are you needing 30
    samples per second from speakers you also need something in that
    neighborhood to satisfy your visual sensors (eyes/brain). This is a
    much more complex problem for computers and requires even more
    processing power. More than that, it often involves firing up that
    expensive video card GPU and doing fun things there, especially if you
    are using the visualization-creating features of things like VLC. To
    compare with your documents, open about ten of them (make them
    good-sized ones) and go see how much, once they are open and steady,
    your CPU is dedicating time to LibreOffice. The result should be just
    about nothing. When typing your CPU is similarly pretty idle because
    you don’t type anywhere near its capacity to do stuff, even if it is
    doing on-the-fly spell checking.

You could likely blame your music specifically. Want proof? Fire up
VLC but don’t play the music. Does the problem exist? Apparently not
VLC’s fault… but now play your music (which is, in itself, software
and not hardware) and you’ll see the problem. I’m making this point to
show that it’s not the digital parts, but the hardware bits, which are
allowing the system to overheat.

In summary: If hardware overheats it is the fault of the hardware or the
environment (the physical environment) in almost every case. That it
does not happen in another OS is interesting but others have already
given some pointers on how to watch the system’s sensors. Much busier
computers than yours run just fine without overheating, and it is
because they are designed to dissipate heat properly. The tiniest heat
source can heat any properly-insulated space, and any amount of heat can
be dissipated if the right environment is in place to dissipate it.

Good luck.
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ab wrote:
> When you listen to music you
> are processing around 30 samples per second as I recall

I agree with everything you say but this bit is technically inaccurate.
30 samples per second is a reasonable frame rate for video but totally
inadequate for audio. CDs have a sample rate over 44,000 samples per
second, for example. mp3 varies from less than this to around 3 times as
much. The video frame rate is not the data rate in a video signal of
course, that’s much higher again. There’s a historical explanation at

http://www.cs.columbia.edu/~hgs/audio/44.1.html

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Of course you’re right… I had my numbers all stuck in video-land,
which is terrible. Thank-you for pointing out something accurate.

Good luck.
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On 11/14/2012 12:16 PM, hcvv wrote:
> Simply ignoring is the shortest way into no posting to you thread anymore.

there are only two options:

  1. solve the heat problem (a hardware issue)
    or
  2. do not use the software which drives the hardware to make heat faster
    than the hardware can dissipate it…(don’t listen to music or watch videos)

NOTE: the ability to dissipate heat DECREASES over time with the buildup
of an even VERY thin layer of (say) nicotine and tar exhaled by smokers;
or a layer of microscopic soot from oil, coal, wood heating sorces; or
even grease from deep-fat fryers; additionally, the thermal grease
between the CPU case and the heat sink will dry out over time and become
less capable of quickly and completely move heat away from the CPU…

so, just keep telling us YOUR problem is a software problem, and it will
stay your problem, and get worse and worse as the insulating layers
buildup, and the thermal grease dries out–i am out of this thread.


dd

Thanks a lot anyway. I started to measure temperature and during playback it increased for 12 F after 15-20 min and it continued to increase gradually.

Thanks

Veki