Speeding up Booting - Boot Time 8min 29.588sec with userspace alone 8min 16.386sec

Note that ModemManager is not in the critical chain, but the Firewall is.

The only reason I suggest turning off the network is so the system is safer when you turn the firewall off to boot down and for booting up.

Either ModemManager is holding up the Firewall initializing, or the Firewall is configured in a way that takes a long time to initialize and it then also holds up ModemManager

NetworkManager.service takes less than a quarter of a second to load, so turning off networking is in itself not going to gain you more than part of a blink of an eye.

Is the plymouth screen just the splash screen or is it also the program that tells what things have been loaded?

If the program that gives scrolling text is not part of plymouth then what is it called?

If it is just the splash screen then, I don’t need it. It looks hideous.

Sorry, something is unclear.

Do you use a 2G/3G/4G modem? If not, disable ModemManager and see if things improve.

Just the splash. But I would not think it would do much on speeding things up

Check to make sure the Fire wall is actually running (can be done from Yast). I had problems with the new wicked driver and because it never started right some thing did not get initialized. This may slow the firewall start.

Hi
Easy enough to remove (I do…);


zypper se -i plymouth
zypper rm (packages from above command)
mkinitrd

Yes, removing plymouth speeds up boot.

Okay, it may not speed things up in terms of clock time. But it does speed it up in terms of psychological time. Instead of twiddling your thumb staring at a barely changing green screen, you see a rapid stream of startup messages.

QUOTE=lorenzodes;2706606]Do you use a 2G/3G/4G modem? If not, disable ModemManager and see if things improve.[/QUOTE]
With root privileges, did

systemctl disable modemmanager.service

Result, ModemManager.service now takes 9.163s instead of 17.166s.

Did I do it properly.

akash@akash:~> systemd-analyze
Startup finished in 2.053s (firmware) + 2.476s (loader) + 2.762s (kernel) + 3.352s (initrd) + 31.216s (userspace) = 41.861s
akash@akash:~> systemd-analyze critical-chain
The time after the unit is active or started is printed after the "@" character.
The time the unit takes to start is printed after the "+" character.

graphical.target @31.210s
└─multi-user.target @31.210s
  └─dkms.service @18.802s +12.406s
    └─basic.target @18.791s
      └─timers.target @18.789s
        └─systemd-tmpfiles-clean.timer @18.789s
          └─sysinit.target @18.789s
            └─apparmor.service @17.751s +1.038s
              └─systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service @17.565s +184ms
                └─local-fs.target @17.546s
                  └─run-media-akash-DATA.mount @14.557s +1.927s
                    └─dev-disk-by\x2dlabel-DATA.device @14.551s
akash@akash:~> systemd-analyze blame         
         12.406s dkms.service
         10.025s display-manager.service
          9.163s ModemManager.service
          8.471s systemd-udev-settle.service
          7.952s SuSEfirewall2_init.service
          2.229s postfix.service
          2.156s lvm2-activation-early.service
          1.927s run-media-akash-DATA.mount
          1.636s NetworkManager.service
          1.411s systemd-journald.service
          1.393s systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
          1.274s dev-hugepages.mount
          1.273s dev-mqueue.mount
          1.272s sys-kernel-debug.mount
          1.174s SuSEfirewall2.service
          1.063s systemd-fsck-root.service
          1.045s boot-efi.mount
          1.038s apparmor.service
          1.025s polkit.service
           978ms systemd-udev-trigger.service                                                                                                                                                   
           830ms lvm2-activation.service                                                                                                                                                        
           505ms vboxdrv.service                                                                                                                                                                
           454ms systemd-modules-load.service                                                                                                                                                   
           356ms dm-event.service                                                                                                                                                               
           354ms lvm2-lvmetad.service                                                                                                                                                           
           315ms user@1000.service                                                                                                                                                              
           207ms systemd-readahead-replay.service                                                                                                                                               
           203ms jexec.service                                                                                                                                                                  
           199ms rtkit-daemon.service                                                                                                                                                           
           188ms console-kit-log-system-start.service                                                                                                                                           
           188ms alsa-restore.service                                                                                                                                                           
           184ms systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service                                                                                                                                                 
           179ms systemd-user-sessions.service                                                                                                                                                  
           168ms nscd.service
           165ms rc-local.service
           151ms systemd-remount-fs.service
           146ms systemd-readahead-collect.service
           144ms systemd-sysctl.service
           138ms avahi-daemon.service
           121ms wpa_supplicant.service
           111ms kmod-static-nodes.service
            82ms console-kit-daemon.service
            71ms cycle.service
            48ms systemd-udev-root-symlink.service
            43ms auditd.service
            41ms plymouth-read-write.service
            38ms udisks2.service
            37ms iscsi.service
            31ms dev-sda8.swap
            15ms plymouth-start.service
            14ms systemd-vconsole-setup.service
             7ms systemd-journal-flush.service
             6ms upower.service
             6ms systemd-rfkill@rfkill1.service
             6ms systemd-logind.service
             5ms systemd-update-utmp-runlevel.service
             4ms systemd-rfkill@rfkill2.service
             4ms proc-sys-fs-binfmt_misc.mount
             3ms systemd-update-utmp.service
             3ms systemd-rfkill@rfkill0.service
             3ms systemd-random-seed.service
             3ms systemd-udevd.service
             2ms sys-fs-fuse-connections.mount
             2ms systemd-backlight@backlight:intel_backlight.service
             2ms systemd-readahead-done.service
             2ms bluetooth.service

Hi
So why not use journalctl to see what the dkms service is doing? On my systems I don’t even see it appear, since it isn’t installed or used, plus don’t use vbox, instead use kvm.

Did

zypper rm plymouth plymouth-dracut plymouth-plugin-script plymouth-scripts plymouth-branding-openSUSE


and mkinitrd as suggested

The hideous screen in gone. And my beloved scrolling text that tells me about loading components is also gone too. Why?

Result, overall boot time got increased.

akash@akash:~> systemd-analyze
Startup finished in 2.054s (firmware) + 2.956s (loader) + 2.617s (kernel) + 3.301s (initrd) + 39.321s (userspace) = 50.251s

Ok now time to play with my firewall settings.
In Firewall yast settings
Startup firewall - on
Interfaces - nothing added
Allowed Services - Nothing Added
Masquerading - Nothing Added
Broadcast - Nothing Added
Logging Level - For both Accepted and Non Accepted Packets - Log Only Critical
Custom Rules - Nothing Added

There is no room for playing here. What should I do with Firewall settings?

How can I do that?
Entering journalctl command shows too much data and journalctl | grep dkms shows old data.

akash@akash:~> journalctl | grep dkms
Feb 01 12:11:30 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1851]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert 'nvidia_uvm': No such device
Feb 01 12:11:30 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1851]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert 'nvidia': No such device
Feb 01 12:55:47 akash.acer dbus[1870]: [system] Rejected send message, 2 matched rules; type="method_call", sender=":1.50" (uid=1000 pid=4293 comm="systemctl enable dkms ") interface="org.freedesktop.systemd1.Manager" member="EnableUnitFiles" error name="(unset)" requested_reply="0" destination="org.freedesktop.systemd1" (uid=0 pid=1 comm="/usr/lib/systemd/systemd --switched-root --system ")
Feb 01 16:34:14 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1953]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert 'nvidia_uvm': No such device
Feb 01 16:34:14 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1953]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert 'nvidia': No such device
Feb 02 10:28:11 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1480]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert 'nvidia_uvm': No such device
Feb 02 10:28:11 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1480]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert 'nvidia': No such device
Feb 02 21:41:02 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1358]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert 'nvidia_uvm': No such device
Feb 02 21:41:02 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1358]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert 'nvidia': No such device
Feb 02 22:18:07 akash dkms.systemd[1416]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert 'nvidia_uvm': No such device
Feb 02 22:18:07 akash dkms.systemd[1416]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert 'nvidia': No such device

How to use journalctl?

On Fri 24 Apr 2015 03:26:01 PM CDT, vish 99 wrote:

malcolmlewis;2706641 Wrote:
> Hi
> So why not use journalctl to see what the dkms service is doing? On my
> systems I don’t even see it appear, since it isn’t installed or used,
> plus don’t use vbox, instead use kvm.
How can I do that?
Entering journalctl command shows too much data and journalctl shows old
data.

Code:

akash@akash:~> journalctl | grep dkms
Feb 01 12:11:30 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1851]: modprobe: ERROR: could
not insert ‘nvidia_uvm’: No such device Feb 01 12:11:30 akash.acer
dkms.systemd[1851]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert ‘nvidia’: No such
device Feb 01 12:55:47 akash.acer dbus[1870]: [system] Rejected send
message, 2 matched rules; type=“method_call”, sender=“:1.50” (uid=1000
pid=4293 comm=“systemctl enable dkms “)
interface=“org.freedesktop.systemd1.Manager” member=“EnableUnitFiles”
error name=”(unset)” requested_reply=“0”
destination=“org.freedesktop.systemd1” (uid=0 pid=1
comm="/usr/lib/systemd/systemd --switched-root --system ") Feb 01
16:34:14 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1953]: modprobe: ERROR: could not
insert ‘nvidia_uvm’: No such device Feb 01 16:34:14 akash.acer
dkms.systemd[1953]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert ‘nvidia’: No such
device Feb 02 10:28:11 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1480]: modprobe: ERROR:
could not insert ‘nvidia_uvm’: No such device Feb 02 10:28:11
akash.acer dkms.systemd[1480]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert
‘nvidia’: No such device Feb 02 21:41:02 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1358]:
modprobe: ERROR: could not insert ‘nvidia_uvm’: No such device Feb 02
21:41:02 akash.acer dkms.systemd[1358]: modprobe: ERROR: could not
insert ‘nvidia’: No such device Feb 02 22:18:07 akash
dkms.systemd[1416]: modprobe: ERROR: could not insert ‘nvidia_uvm’: No
such device Feb 02 22:18:07 akash dkms.systemd[1416]: modprobe: ERROR:
could not insert ‘nvidia’: No such device --------------------

How to use journalctl?

Hi
So you have an issue with the nvidia driver, hence the delay… fix it?

The man page for journalctl is worth a perusal…

Try something like;


journalctl --no-pager -u dkms

The -u is for the systemd unit your looking at.


Cheers Malcolm °¿° LFCS, SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 12 GNOME 3.10.1 Kernel 3.12.39-47-default
If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
please show your appreciation and click on the star below… Thanks!

Removed vbox by

zypper rm virtualbox virtualbox-guest-kmp-desktop virtualbox-host-kmp-desktop  virtualbox-qt

It automatically did initrd.

Result. No change.

akash@akash:~> systemd-analyze
Startup finished in 2.045s (firmware) + 2.604s (loader) + 2.614s (kernel) + 3.482s (initrd) + 47.993s (userspace) = 58.738s
akash@akash:~> systemd-analyze critical-chain
The time after the unit is active or started is printed after the "@" character.
The time the unit takes to start is printed after the "+" character.

graphical.target @47.987s
└─multi-user.target @47.987s
  └─cron.service @47.987s
    └─postfix.service @47.092s +894ms
      └─network.target @46.891s
        └─NetworkManager.service @45.851s +1.040s
          └─SuSEfirewall2_init.service @19.774s +26.075s
            └─basic.target @19.659s
              └─timers.target @19.659s
                └─systemd-tmpfiles-clean.timer @19.659s
                  └─sysinit.target @19.659s
                    └─apparmor.service @19.322s +335ms
                      └─systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service @19.134s +188ms
                        └─local-fs.target @19.121s
                          └─run-media-akash-DATA.mount @13.580s +3.032s
                            └─dev-disk-by\x2dlabel-DATA.device @13.579s
akash@akash:~> systemd-analyze blame
         26.820s display-manager.service
         26.312s ModemManager.service
         26.075s SuSEfirewall2_init.service
         13.240s dkms.service
          7.624s systemd-udev-settle.service
          3.032s run-media-akash-DATA.mount
          2.501s lvm2-activation-early.service
          2.266s lvm2-activation.service
          2.027s systemd-vconsole-setup.service
          1.404s systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
          1.163s systemd-logind.service
          1.160s dev-mqueue.mount
          1.159s sys-kernel-debug.mount
          1.158s dev-hugepages.mount
          1.077s systemd-journald.service
          1.040s NetworkManager.service                                                                                                                                                         
          1.015s systemd-rfkill@rfkill1.service                                                                                                                                                 
          1.012s systemd-rfkill@rfkill2.service                                                                                                                                                 
           909ms systemd-fsck-root.service                                                                                                                                                      
           894ms postfix.service                                                                                                                                                                
           725ms polkit.service                                                                                                                                                                 
           503ms dm-event.service                                                                                                                                                               
           442ms rtkit-daemon.service                                                                                                                                                           
           393ms systemd-modules-load.service                                                                                                                                                   
           335ms apparmor.service                                                                                                                                                               
           335ms systemd-backlight@backlight:intel_backlight.service                                                                                                                            
           322ms boot-efi.mount                                                                                                                                                                 
           274ms SuSEfirewall2.service                                                                                                                                                          
           270ms systemd-remount-fs.service                                                                                                                                                     
           259ms systemd-rfkill@rfkill0.service
           253ms systemd-random-seed.service
           188ms systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service
           137ms systemd-readahead-replay.service
           135ms systemd-readahead-collect.service
           131ms jexec.service
           116ms kmod-static-nodes.service
           114ms alsa-restore.service
           114ms console-kit-log-system-start.service
           112ms systemd-user-sessions.service
           108ms nscd.service
           107ms rc-local.service
           100ms lvm2-lvmetad.service
           100ms systemd-udev-trigger.service
            88ms dev-sda8.swap
            81ms avahi-daemon.service
            77ms systemd-sysctl.service
            75ms wpa_supplicant.service
            69ms console-kit-daemon.service
            59ms cycle.service
            50ms user@1000.service
            38ms systemd-udev-root-symlink.service
            37ms udisks2.service
            33ms auditd.service
             8ms systemd-journal-flush.service
             7ms upower.service
             5ms proc-sys-fs-binfmt_misc.mount
             4ms systemd-update-utmp-runlevel.service
             3ms systemd-update-utmp.service
             3ms systemd-readahead-done.service
             2ms bluetooth.service
             2ms sys-fs-fuse-connections.mount
             2ms systemd-udevd.service
             2ms iscsi.service

Looks like you have a problem with NVIDIA driver. Is this a Optimus based system (Intel+NVIDIA GPU)?

Re install the appropriate NVIDIA driver for your hardware.

On Fri 24 Apr 2015 03:56:02 PM CDT, vish 99 wrote:

akash@akash:~> systemd-analyze blame
26.820s display-manager.service
26.312s ModemManager.service
26.075s SuSEfirewall2_init.service
13.240s dkms.service

Hi
As indicated by user gogalthorp sort out the nvidia issue, I would
guess that both dkms and you display manager setup are being affected.

There was no need to remove vbox, unless you not using it.

Also why is dkms installed in the first place, it’s a packman build?


Cheers Malcolm °¿° LFCS, SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 12 GNOME 3.10.1 Kernel 3.12.39-47-default
If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
please show your appreciation and click on the star below… Thanks!

Is DKMS not needed for regular operation of openSUSE.
I don’t remember if installed DKMS separatly or is dependency of any other package. How can I check that?

Thought of using KVM in place of vbox. Thought DKMS was being troubled by vbox.

The error which I’m getting is of February. See carefully. Will the error have been persistent till now.

Try something like;


journalctl --no-pager -u dkms

The -u is for the systemd unit your looking at.

anyways I’ll post the output of code once I log into my laptop. Posting by firefox on android right now.

Yes it is and I’ll do it.

DKMS is used to re link drivers to the kernel when something changes

If optimus be sure to use the NVIDIA-bumblebee not the regular driver

Hi
But something is still causing dkms service issues, how or why it’s installed is a question only you can answer since it’s from the packman repository not a standard openSUSE one.

Hopefully the journalctl options will provide some more details?

In Yast bootloader, remove the parameter that has “quiet” (the splash=silent one can remain, you will still get your scrolling lines).

Result, overall boot time got increased.

akash@akash:~> systemd-analyze
Startup finished in 2.054s (firmware) + 2.956s (loader) + 2.617s (kernel) + 3.301s (initrd) + 39.321s (userspace) = 50.251s

Note that you should check your boot times more than once. They do very from one boot to another. The next time might be 10 or 20 seconds quicker. Different services sometimes need to do different actions at different boot times. To get a more accurate look at boot times, run at least 3 and look for an average.:wink:

Ok now time to play with my firewall settings.
In Firewall yast settings
Startup firewall - on
Interfaces - nothing added
Allowed Services - Nothing Added
Masquerading - Nothing Added
Broadcast - Nothing Added
Logging Level - For both Accepted and Non Accepted Packets - Log Only Critical
Custom Rules - Nothing Added

There is no room for playing here. What should I do with Firewall settings?

This looks good to me.

He is using bumblebee:

:wink: