SOLVED: Virtual Box storage problems with snapshots

Hi

I’ve got XP running in VBox on my openSUSE 11.3 (and I must ay it leaves VMware absolutely for dead).

I’ve only got 30Gb partition size reserved for my /home partition and I don’t want to increase that. I do have plenty of spare space on another partition and I have the VM files for the XP machine on the other partition.

I like to make snapshots. But the extra files that build up after taking a snapshot all go into my home partition, accruing in the location /home/john/.VirtualBox, instead of accruing in the place I’ve reserved on the extra partition for the VBox files.

In summary: if I don’t take snapshots, all the accruals go into the extra partition (and that’s what I want) but if I do make a snapshot, thereafter all the accruals go into my home partition (but I don’t want that to happen).

What do you suggest I do?

Which VM are you using. The one out of the repo, 3.2.6 I think. Anyways , you should be able to config. which folder/dir. you want it to go in.
Start VM , Do not start the guest, Go to settings , the general page will appear , click on advance and config from there.
The VM from the VM site works better for me 3.2.8 , the USB bus and other thing work, which did not with the one in the repo.
I tested the one I am using and it works fine. I am doing the same as you, storing virtual drive and snapshot in a backup partition.

On 15/08/10 05:36, linclkh wrote:
>
> Which VM are you using. The one out of the repo, 3.2.6 I think. Anyways
> , you should be able to config. which folder/dir. you want it to go in.
> Start VM , Do not start the guest, Go to settings , the general page
> will appear , click on advance and config from there.
> The VM from the VM site works better for me 3.2.8 , the USB bus and
> other thing work, which did not with the one in the repo.
> I tested the one I am using and it works fine. I am doing the same as
> you, storing virtual drive and snapshot in a backup partition.
>
>

I also keep all my ISO images in a folder on the partition. You never
know when you may want to run a live CD on your XP VM and it’s easier to
find this way :slight_smile:


PeeGee

Asus m/b M2V-MX SE, AMD LE1640, 2GB, openSUSE 11.2/11.0 x86_64 dual boot

  • XP Home in VBox
    Asus m/b M2NPV-VM, AMD 64X2 3800+, 2GB, openSUSE 10.3 x86_64/XP Home
    dual boot
    Acer Aspire 1350, AMD (M)XP2400+, 768MB, openSUSE 11.2/XP Home dual boot
    Asus eeePC 4G (701), Celeron M353, 2GB, openSUSE 11.2 on SSD

Thanks guys

I use the sun download.virtualbox.org repo.
I have changed the location of “Default Hard Disk Folder” and “Default Machine Folder” to the extra partition as per linclkh’s advice. However when I make a snapshot, from that time the accuals location switches back to my home folder.

I used to move both folders away from /home/whatever to a data sharing partition for multiboot use, but had some problems with that. I moved the “Default Machine Folder” back to my home directory on each system. No further problems with that, Machine folder was much smaller than the .vdi stuff, too small to worry about, but that’s without snapshots.

You may have to compromize or move snapshots out from /home temporarily, and back when you need them. You could try posting your requirement on the VirtualBox site, or look for a solution there?

I figured it out.

First I moved the whole operation, all files, everything, back into the home folder, inside the standard hidden directory /home/john/.VirtualBox, just to make sure everything was still working in default mode.
Then with the VM switched off I moved that hidden folder and all its contents to the spare partition with a symbolic link to the new location from the old location in the home folder.

Works great and all the storage burden is on the spare partition inside the new .VirtualBox folder.

Well done Swerdna, I can use that. :wink:

Now if this was a microsoft issue, you would have to pay to use it because I would copyright the method and licence the use LOL.

On 15/08/10 10:36, swerdna wrote:
>
> Thanks guys
>
> I use the sun download.virtualbox.org repo.
> I have changed the location of “Default Hard Disk Folder” and “Default
> Machine Folder” to the extra partition as per linclkh’s advice. However
> when I make a snapshot, from that time the accuals location switches
> back to my home folder.
>
>

Just a guess - do you have any existing snapshots? It may be that VB
wants all snapshots for a VM in the same folder.


PeeGee

Asus m/b M2V-MX SE, AMD LE1640, 2GB, openSUSE 11.2/11.0 x86_64 dual boot

  • XP Home in VBox
    Asus m/b M2NPV-VM, AMD 64X2 3800+, 2GB, openSUSE 10.3 x86_64/XP Home
    dual boot
    Acer Aspire 1350, AMD (M)XP2400+, 768MB, openSUSE 11.2/XP Home dual boot
    Asus eeePC 4G (701), Celeron M353, 2GB, openSUSE 11.2 on SSD

swerdna wrote:

>
> I figured it out.
>
> First I moved the whole operation, all files, everything, back into the
> home folder, inside the standard hidden directory
> /home/john/.VirtualBox, just to make sure everything was still working
> in default mode.
> Then with the VM switched off I moved that hidden folder and all its
> contents to the spare partition with a symbolic link to the new location
> from the old location in the home folder.
>
> Works great and all the storage burden is on the spare partition inside
> the new .VirtualBox folder.

I was running out of space on the physical drive I was using so I moved the
moved the whole .VirtualBox folder to a second drive then just mounted that
partition on home - same effect, symlink or mount.


Will Honea

Quite so, Will Honea. I prefer the symlink for two reasons:

  1. If I use a symlink, then only the VBox files are involved, but if I use a mount, then all the files in the extra partition are involved, and this ratrher linmits the versatility of the extra partition.
  2. If I back up my home partition and I have another partition mounted therein, the backup will include all the files on the mounted partition into the backup, but I don’t want that, it’s like 30Gb extra.

swerdna wrote:

>
> Will Honea;2207319 Wrote:
>> swerdna wrote:
>>
>> >
>> > I figured it out.
>> >
>> > First I moved the whole operation, all files, everything, back into
>> the
>> > home folder, inside the standard hidden directory
>> > /home/john/.VirtualBox, just to make sure everything was still
>> working
>> > in default mode.
>> > Then with the VM switched off I moved that hidden folder and all its
>> > contents to the spare partition with a symbolic link to the new
>> location
>> > from the old location in the home folder.
>> >
>> > Works great and all the storage burden is on the spare partition
>> inside
>> > the new .VirtualBox folder.
>>
>> I was running out of space on the physical drive I was using so I moved
>> the
>> moved the whole .VirtualBox folder to a second drive then just mounted
>> that
>> partition on home - same effect, symlink or mount.
>>
>> –
>> Will Honea
>
> Quite so, Will Honea. I prefer the symlink for two reasons:
>
> - If I use a symlink, then only the VBox files are involved, but if I
> use a mount, then all the files in the extra partition are involved,
> and this ratrher linmits the versatility of the extra partition.
> - If I back up my home partition and I have another partition mounted
> therein, the backup will include all the files on the mounted
> partition into the backup, but I don’t want that, it’s like 30Gb
> extra.

Not sure I buy all of your first reason but the second one is obvious when
you think about it. I guess I should eventually move to JFS but…

I like the isolated storage of the .vdi containers because it allows me to
keep a single image on a network drive at the office where it is necessary
to keep everyone’s working directory synced on the VM - damned Win app that
insists on a hard-coded data path. If you look at it, it’s actually pretty
simple to keep only the vdi container elsewhere - the .VirtualBox folder for
each user is really small when the images are removed.


Will Honea

Not sure I buy all of your first reason but the second one is obvious when
you think about it. I guess I should eventually move to JFS but…

What’s the attraction of JFS in this case Will?

swerdna wrote:

>
>> Not sure I buy all of your first reason but the second one is obvious
>> when
>> you think about it. I guess I should eventually move to JFS but…
>
> What’s the attraction of JFS in this case Will?

Convenience, mostly. I informally support several local churches which
means nobody agrees with anyone else on the “best solution” :wink: As a
result, I keep 10-12 configurations on disk as virtual images of the
specific setups and never seem to have enough space on whatever partition I
have set up when something new comes up.

After I posted the above, I did a little experimenting and there are some
details I had overlooked which makes JFS less than ideal. Spanning drives
for dynamic sizing becomes attractive when I suddenly need another copy to
work from. I’ve been just switching mounts around as needed but that means
I don’t have a simple search or view of all the available setups. Turns
out, dynamic resizing just complicates matters once you get any significant
fragmentation. There also some significant differences in the Linux JFS and
the version I have used in the past on OS/2.

In short, another good idea runs aground on reality.


Will Honea

Ah, life intrudes again, what a nuisance LOL

swerdna wrote:

>
> Ah, life intrudes again, what a nuisance LOL

Especially when dealing with a “don’t bother me with facts; my mind is made
up” admin :wink:


Will Honea

On Sun, 15 Aug 2010 10:36:03 GMT, swerdna
<swerdna@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

>
>I figured it out.
>
>First I moved the whole operation, all files, everything, back into the
>home folder, inside the standard hidden directory
>/home/john/.VirtualBox, just to make sure everything was still working
>in default mode.
>Then with the VM switched off I moved that hidden folder and all its
>contents to the spare partition with a symbolic link to the new location
>from the old location in the home folder.
>
>Works great and all the storage burden is on the spare partition inside
>the new .VirtualBox folder.

Sweet, i’ll remember that.

On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 21:36:02 GMT, swerdna
<swerdna@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

>
>Will Honea;2207319 Wrote:
>> swerdna wrote:
>>
>> >
>> > I figured it out.
>> >
>> > First I moved the whole operation, all files, everything, back into
>> the
>> > home folder, inside the standard hidden directory
>> > /home/john/.VirtualBox, just to make sure everything was still
>> working
>> > in default mode.
>> > Then with the VM switched off I moved that hidden folder and all its
>> > contents to the spare partition with a symbolic link to the new
>> location
>> > from the old location in the home folder.
>> >
>> > Works great and all the storage burden is on the spare partition
>> inside
>> > the new .VirtualBox folder.
>>
>> I was running out of space on the physical drive I was using so I moved
>> the
>> moved the whole .VirtualBox folder to a second drive then just mounted
>> that
>> partition on home - same effect, symlink or mount.
>>
>> –
>> Will Honea
>
>Quite so, Will Honea. I prefer the symlink for two reasons:
>
>- If I use a symlink, then only the VBox files are involved, but if I
> use a mount, then all the files in the extra partition are involved,
> and this ratrher linmits the versatility of the extra partition.
>- If I back up my home partition and I have another partition mounted
> therein, the backup will include all the files on the mounted
> partition into the backup, but I don’t want that, it’s like 30Gb
> extra.

I’ll remember this as well.

On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 18:10:27 GMT, Will Honea <whonea@yahoo.com> wrote:

>swerdna wrote:
>
>>
>>> Not sure I buy all of your first reason but the second one is obvious
>>> when
>>> you think about it. I guess I should eventually move to JFS but…
>>
>> What’s the attraction of JFS in this case Will?
>
>Convenience, mostly. I informally support several local churches which
>means nobody agrees with anyone else on the “best solution” :wink: As a
>result, I keep 10-12 configurations on disk as virtual images of the
>specific setups and never seem to have enough space on whatever partition I
>have set up when something new comes up.
>
>After I posted the above, I did a little experimenting and there are some
>details I had overlooked which makes JFS less than ideal. Spanning drives
>for dynamic sizing becomes attractive when I suddenly need another copy to
>work from. I’ve been just switching mounts around as needed but that means
>I don’t have a simple search or view of all the available setups. Turns
>out, dynamic resizing just complicates matters once you get any significant
>fragmentation. There also some significant differences in the Linux JFS and
>the version I have used in the past on OS/2.
>
>In short, another good idea runs aground on reality.

I think i woould have tried to use LVM for that. Not sure if it would
do what is wanted though.