SMART disk reporting discrepancy

I loaded the live CD (Gnome) and I got a warning about my Hard Drive, saying it was in danger of failing.
Further details were that there were 360 Reallocated Sectors, and I should back data up and replace Hard Drive
I re-ran test under windows, and it advised only 154 Reallocated Sectors, and that this was within acceptable tolerances.

I know that the bias would be to say that Linux is right :slight_smile:

Is there any way to tell which tool is accurate?

Thanks

I loaded the live CD (Gnome) and I got a warning about my Hard Drive, saying it was in danger of failing.
Further details were that there were 360 Reallocated Sectors, and I should back data up and replace Hard Drive
I re-ran test under windows, and it advised only 154 Reallocated Sectors, and that this was within acceptable tolerances.

I know that the bias would be to say that Linux is right :slight_smile:

Is there any way to tell which tool is accurate?

Thanks

So as opposed to quibbling over 360 vs 154 Reallocated Sectors, what is the history of this hard drive? Is it internal or External? Do you have a current backup of its data?

Further, How old is it? How hot does it run? Has it ever been dropped or have had any other close call? Is it critical to the system boot? Does it contain irreplaceable data? Can you afford right now to purchase a new hard drive?

If you can answer yes to two or more of the last few questions, perhaps a new hard drive should be in your future. Hard drives work great until they fail at a time of their own choosing regardless if you have backed up important data on it or not.

Thank You,

On 09/05/2011 02:06 PM, dehawkinz wrote:
>
> I loaded the live CD (Gnome) and I got a warning about my Hard Drive,
> saying it was in danger of failing.
> Further details were that there were 360 Reallocated Sectors, and I
> should back data up and replace Hard Drive
> I re-ran test under windows, and it advised only 154 Reallocated
> Sectors, and that this was within acceptable tolerances.
>
> I know that the bias would be to say that Linux is right :slight_smile:
>
> Is there any way to tell which tool is accurate?

Well, it is your data. I always replace a drive whenever the number of
reallocated sectors increases, and I trust smartd in Linux. I trust nothing
under Windows.

what is the history of this hard drive? It is the original disk that came with the system
Is it internal or External? Internal
Do you have a current backup of its data? As current as I can get
How old is it? 7 years
How hot does it run? 26-28C / 78-82F
Has it ever been dropped or have had any other close call? No
Is it critical to the system boot? it is the boot drive
Does it contain irreplaceable data? No
Can you afford right now to purchase a new hard drive? on the basis that if it failed I would have no option, I suppose the answer would have to be yes :slight_smile:

I am looking at going part and part Windows / Linux until I can make the switch. The aim is to move to Linux for my ‘productivity’ activities and keep the Windows for those Windows games I still have and play. I am a definite died in the wool Windows user, although I was brought up on DOS so the command line concept is not a scary prospect :slight_smile:

Thank you both, I think a new Hard Drive is in my future :slight_smile:

I am looking at going part and part Windows / Linux until I can make the switch. The aim is to move to Linux for my ‘productivity’ activities and keep the Windows for those Windows games I still have and play. I am a definite died in the wool Windows user, although I was brought up on DOS so the command line concept is not a scary prospect :slight_smile:

Thank you both, I think a new Hard Drive is in my future :slight_smile:

So at seven years old, one must say it has been faithful to you and buying a new one would be prudent. Consider the hard drive interface. It is most likely IDE and not SATA. Make sure you know the type interface for the new hard drive. Look online for a good deal if it is OK to ship such products to were you live in the world. Consider your computer BIOS abilities. Older systems had an issue with very large hard drives though the problem has been fixed for a while but stay at 2 TB or smaller. If this is a desktop and you have an open PCI slot, SATA controllers are not all that expensive and would allow you to use the new hard drives. Make sure it allows you to boot from the hard drive. If you have technical questions about hard drives, interfaces or even disk partitioning, you only need to ask. And good luck!

Thank You,

No need to discuss this: reallocation is not done just for fun, it’s done due to a degrading condition of the disk. Replace as soon as possible. My 2 cents

Knurpht wrote:

>
> No need to discuss this: reallocation is not done just for fun, it’s
> done due to a degrading condition of the disk. Replace as soon as
> possible. My 2 cents

+1

At that age it’s probably approaching the mtbf operating hours. You might
re-run the test sequence under Linux - I’d bet on getting different
reallocation values for each run on flakey sectors.


WHonea

I checked the Motherboard Manual, and it supports SATA (will need cables, but that’s hardly a problem) even though the current installed drive is IDE

Good point, I will re-test at weekend.