[Secondary DNS] help me please with IP

hi all :slight_smile:

my provider some times have problems with dns server…

sometimes it possible to connect to some node by ip and coul not connect to it by name
hope this understandable…

so i search long time to free secondary dns in the net that i can connect… in this cases…

i hope somebody new such free internet dns services…

Alternatively you can set up your own DNS resolving server. It’s just the out-of-the-box named.conf setup but you don’t set any forwarders so it will do the resolution all by itself.

thank you ken_yap
for your quick reaply…

as far that I understand you suggest start my own dns server? and use it as alternative…

I am not administer(i only administer my very small home network) so this new to me…

looking into /etc/named.conf

hm…

ok run dns-server from yast

same…

It’s just the out-of-the-box named.conf setup

this seems to me is I understand

but you don’t set any forwarders

yes I don’t (i am not edit it) i have commented


#forwarders { 192.0.2.1; 192.0.2.2; };

so it will do the resolution all by itself.

aha… if it will be started…

ok something i am not understanding…

i have dsl and router/ serv all-in-one hardware… it also linuxbox so dns is set on it and my primary dns is ip of router…
but time to time if providers dns down dns on router could not help even with
>ping google.com

I recently use it

if I start own dns server did it will collect ip’s? another words will local dns have local database of site/ip’s that i surf?

and last how can i start it(DNS-server)?

thank you

Yes it will cache entries that you have fetched. Naturally you must tell all the clients on your network to use it, either edit /etc/resolv.conf, or if you are getting an address by DHCP, by modifying the DHCP config (which might be at your router, if you are using that to assign addresses). And of course your DNS server should stay up to serve the clients.

To start it, go to YaST and start the service. Runlevel editor I think.

You can test it by:

dig @your-server-ip forums.opensuse.org

If you don’t have dig you need to install the bind-utils package.

Also if you have the SUSE firewall running, you should allow port 53 UDP and TCP incoming so that your clients can use the service.

Thank you for very extended answer :slight_smile:

it was very helpful

dns-server is up and dig works…

+1

didencool wrote:

>
> Thank you for very extended answer :slight_smile:
>
> it was very helpful
>
> dns-server is up and dig works…
>
> +1
>
>

If in the future you do need an external free DNS config have a look at:

http://www.opendns.com/

I use it here and it has not failed me yet :slight_smile:

Easy to configure on a comp by comp basis or on the router.

Plus it is free :slight_smile:

HTH


Mark…

Nil illegitimi carborundum

Using opendns.com’s servers (seen at the bottom right of their page), and placing them into my router, rather than specifying them in my boxes network settings, has saved me a lot of grief when working with any version of Linux.

By placing the primary and secondary server addresses in the router (it doesn’t have to be opendns.com but could also just be your isp’s server addresses), it can help bypass the typical soho router’s reliance on it’s own internal dns forwarder, which in the past was tuned for Microsoft and Apple’s specs - and not necessarily for the true internet specs - or so I’ve been told.

At any rate, doing this is extremely valuable in mixed-os lan environments as well.

stream303 wrote:

>
> Using opendns.com’s servers (seen at the bottom right of their page),
> and placing them into my router, rather than specifying them in my
> boxes network settings, has saved me a lot of grief when working with
> any version of Linux.
>
> By placing the primary and secondary server addresses in the router
> (it doesn’t have to be opendns.com but could also just be your isp’s
> server addresses), it can help bypass the typical soho router’s
> reliance on it’s own internal dns forwarder, which in the past was
> tuned for Microsoft and Apple’s specs - and not necessarily for the
> true internet specs - or so I’ve been told.
>
> At any rate, doing this is extremely valuable in mixed-os lan
> environments as well.
>
>

Just to add to stream303`s post.

I have my laptop configured with OpenDNS servers which can be quite a boon when using the wireless on other networks that may have been configured with carp DNS servers :slight_smile:


Mark…

Nil illegitimi carborundum

One advantage of running your own DNS server is that you are now well setup to do things like name-based virtual hosting in Apache.