Replace Xubuntu with OpenSuse

Hello. I have an SSD with both Windows 10 and Xubuntu installed. I want to replace Xubuntu with OpenSuse. Could you help me? Thanks.

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Download the .iso and do a clean install.
Backup your most important things to the cloud or to an another pendrive.

What kind of help do you think you need? The openSUSE installer will replace Xubuntu if that’s what you select it as installation type, either using existing partitions, or deleting them and creating new one(s). It may help us help you if you actually need help if you provide here input/output from these 4 Xubuntu commands: inxi -F, efibootmgr, parted -l and lsblk -f.

Mazda spinning Dorito go brrrr

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Hi @vkarafil
I’m an amateur back in openSUSE for 1 year. In this year I have tried Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Fedora and others. The openSUSE installer is great for me. I express a personal and amateur opinion. But I can say that it’s great because if you follow the steps carefully you have many options that even I was able to appreciate (as an amateur).
Greetings

Here is the output of the commands:

inxi -F
System:
Host: AMD4C-XUBUNTU Kernel: 6.5.0-28-generic x86_64 bits: 64
Desktop: Xfce 4.16.0 Distro: Ubuntu 22.04.4 LTS (Jammy Jellyfish)
Machine:
Type: Desktop System: Gigabyte product: N/A v: N/A
serial:
Mobo: Gigabyte model: F2A88X-D3H v: x.x serial:
BIOS: American Megatrends v: F5 date: 05/28/2014
CPU:
Info: quad core model: AMD A8-6500 APU with Radeon HD Graphics bits: 64
type: MT MCP cache: L2: 4 MiB
Speed (MHz): avg: 1699 min/max: 1700/3500 cores: 1: 1700 2: 1700 3: 1697
4: 1700
Graphics:
Device-1: NVIDIA GK208B [GeForce GT 710] driver: nvidia v: 470.239.06
Display: x11 server: X.Org v: 1.21.1.4 driver: X: loaded: nvidia
unloaded: fbdev,modesetting,nouveau,vesa gpu: nvidia
resolution: 2560x1440~60Hz
OpenGL: renderer: NVIDIA GeForce GT 710/PCIe/SSE2
v: 4.6.0 NVIDIA 470.239.06
Audio:
Device-1: AMD FCH Azalia driver: snd_hda_intel
Device-2: NVIDIA GK208 HDMI/DP Audio driver: snd_hda_intel
Sound Server-1: ALSA v: k6.5.0-28-generic running: yes
Sound Server-2: PulseAudio v: 15.99.1 running: yes
Sound Server-3: PipeWire v: 0.3.48 running: yes
Network:
Device-1: Realtek RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet
driver: r8169
IF: enp2s0 state: up speed: 100 Mbps duplex: full mac: 74:d4:35:5c:d1:7a
Drives:
Local Storage: total: 2.96 TiB used: 28.73 GiB (0.9%)
ID-1: /dev/sda vendor: A-Data model: SU750 size: 238.47 GiB
ID-2: /dev/sdb vendor: Western Digital model: WD30EZRX-00MMMB0
size: 2.73 TiB
Partition:
ID-1: / size: 69.13 GiB used: 28.73 GiB (41.6%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda5
ID-2: /boot/efi size: 512 MiB used: 24 KiB (0.0%) fs: vfat dev: /dev/sda3
Swap:
ID-1: swap-1 type: file size: 2 GiB used: 0 KiB (0.0%) file: /swapfile
Sensors:
System Temperatures: cpu: 19.9 C mobo: N/A gpu: nvidia temp: 39 C
Fan Speeds (RPM): N/A
Info:
Processes: 251 Uptime: 3m Memory: 15.55 GiB used: 1.69 GiB (10.8%)
Shell: Bash inxi: 3.3.13

=========================

efibootmgr
EFI variables are not supported on this system.

=======================

parted -l

no output

=========================

lsblk -f

NAME FSTYPE FSVER LABEL UUID FSAVAIL FSUSE% MOUNTPOINTS
loop0 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/audacity/1051
loop1 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/bare/5
loop2 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/chromium/2811
loop3 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/chromium/2828
loop4 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/core/16574
loop5 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/core/16928
loop6 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/core18/2796
loop7 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/core18/2812
loop8 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/core20/2182
loop9 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/core20/2264
loop10 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/core22/1033
loop11 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/core22/1122
loop12 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/cups/1041
loop13 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/cups/1044
loop14 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/firefox/4090
loop15 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/firefox/4136
loop16 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/freac/2981
loop17 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/freac/2996
loop18 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/gnome-3-28-1804/194
loop19 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/gnome-3-28-1804/198
loop20 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/gnome-3-38-2004/140
loop21 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/gnome-3-38-2004/143
loop22 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/gnome-42-2204/172
loop23 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/gnome-42-2204/176
loop24 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/gtk2-common-themes/13
loop25 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/gtk-common-themes/1534
loop26 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/gtk-common-themes/1535
loop27 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/hunspell-dictionaries-1-7-2004/2
loop28 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/kate/171
loop29 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/kde-frameworks-5-core18/32
loop30 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/kde-frameworks-5-core18/35
loop31 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/shotcut/1389
loop32 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/p7zip-desktop/220
loop33 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/skanlite/7
loop34 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/snap-store/959
loop35 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/snapd/21465
loop36 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/shotcut/1357
loop37 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/snap-store/1113
loop38 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/snapd/21184
loop39 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/vcard-studio/18
loop40 squashfs 4.0 0 100% /snap/vcard-studio/21
sda
├─sda1 ntfs System Reserved 460C93A70C939093
├─sda2 ntfs BE4496C844968337
├─sda3 vfat FAT32 7317-4D68 512M 0% /boot/efi
├─sda4
└─sda5 ext4 1.0 378a0a89-44e3-4eb9-82f1-cee5eae245f4 36,8G 42% /var/snap/firefox/common/host-hunspell
/
sdb
└─sdb1 ext4 1.0 b490b5f3-a232-4b9d-beee-8c19ee2bb624
sr0

So, are there any special instructions I should follow in order to replace Xubuntu with OpenSuse?

This causes suspicion that Ubuntu was installed in legacy/BIOS mode, even though an ESP partition exists that Windows most likely put there.

There should have been something. Try again this way: sudo parted -l. If that doesn’t work either, try sudo fdisk -l. Also while booted to Xubuntu provide input/output from cat /etc/fstab. It appears you may have Xubuntu and Windows installed in modes that don’t play so nice together, with Windows in UEFI, and Xubuntu in legacy/MBR. It’s best for most people who have both to have them both in UEFI mode.

When pasting command input/output here, please make use of the </> icon above the input window to wrap your paste in code tags that preserve the formatting of your paste as it was output on your screen. Alternatively, put “~~~” alone on two lines, then put your paste on lines in between them. It causes the same format preservation effect.

Output of the commands you suggested:

sudo parted -l

Model: ATA ADATA SU750 (scsi)
Disk /dev/sda: 256GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos
Disk Flags: 

Number  Start   End    Size    Type      File system  Flags
 1      1049kB  608MB  607MB   primary   ntfs         boot
 2      608MB   180GB  179GB   primary   ntfs
 3      180GB   180GB  538MB   primary   fat32
 4      180GB   256GB  76,0GB  extended
 5      180GB   256GB  76,0GB  logical   ext4


Model: ATA WDC WD30EZRX-00M (scsi)
Disk /dev/sdb: 3001GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/4096B
Partition Table: gpt
Disk Flags: pmbr_boot

Number  Start   End     Size    File system  Name  Flags
 1      1049kB  3001GB  3001GB  ext4



==========
sudo fdisk -l

Disk /dev/loop0: 249,08 MiB, 261177344 bytes, 510112 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop1: 4 KiB, 4096 bytes, 8 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop2: 160,61 MiB, 168411136 bytes, 328928 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop3: 161,59 MiB, 169443328 bytes, 330944 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop4: 103,99 MiB, 109043712 bytes, 212976 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop5: 105,41 MiB, 110526464 bytes, 215872 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop6: 55,66 MiB, 58363904 bytes, 113992 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop7: 55,66 MiB, 58363904 bytes, 113992 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/sda: 238,47 GiB, 256060514304 bytes, 500118192 sectors
Disk model: ADATA SU750     
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xf7bc6f31

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sda1  *         2048   1187839   1185792   579M  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda2         1187840 350611455 349423616 166,6G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda3       350611456 351662079   1050624   513M  b W95 FAT32
/dev/sda4       351664126 500117503 148453378  70,8G  5 Extended
/dev/sda5       351664128 500117503 148453376  70,8G 83 Linux


Disk /dev/sdb: 2,73 TiB, 3000592982016 bytes, 5860533168 sectors
Disk model: WDC WD30EZRX-00M
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: FB0C4B5A-8B70-4E4E-B958-510543C85FEA

Device     Start        End    Sectors  Size Type
/dev/sdb1   2048 5860532223 5860530176  2,7T Linux filesystem


Disk /dev/loop8: 63,91 MiB, 67010560 bytes, 130880 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop9: 63,95 MiB, 67051520 bytes, 130960 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop10: 74,11 MiB, 77713408 bytes, 151784 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop11: 74,21 MiB, 77819904 bytes, 151992 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop12: 67,25 MiB, 70516736 bytes, 137728 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop13: 66,07 MiB, 69283840 bytes, 135320 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop14: 268,25 MiB, 281284608 bytes, 549384 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop15: 269,64 MiB, 282742784 bytes, 552232 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop16: 18,81 MiB, 19726336 bytes, 38528 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop17: 18,97 MiB, 19894272 bytes, 38856 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop18: 164,82 MiB, 172830720 bytes, 337560 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop19: 164,82 MiB, 172830720 bytes, 337560 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop20: 349,69 MiB, 366678016 bytes, 716168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop21: 349,7 MiB, 366682112 bytes, 716176 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop22: 504,15 MiB, 528642048 bytes, 1032504 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop23: 505,09 MiB, 529625088 bytes, 1034424 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop24: 81,26 MiB, 85209088 bytes, 166424 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop25: 140 KiB, 143360 bytes, 280 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop26: 91,69 MiB, 96141312 bytes, 187776 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop27: 37,09 MiB, 38891520 bytes, 75960 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop28: 263,9 MiB, 276721664 bytes, 540472 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop29: 260,71 MiB, 273375232 bytes, 533936 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop30: 289,78 MiB, 303853568 bytes, 593464 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop31: 101,47 MiB, 106397696 bytes, 207808 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop32: 146,02 MiB, 153116672 bytes, 299056 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop33: 147,04 MiB, 154181632 bytes, 301136 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop34: 8,88 MiB, 9310208 bytes, 18184 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop35: 12,93 MiB, 13553664 bytes, 26472 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop36: 12,32 MiB, 12922880 bytes, 25240 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop37: 39,1 MiB, 40996864 bytes, 80072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop38: 38,73 MiB, 40615936 bytes, 79328 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop39: 55,9 MiB, 58613760 bytes, 114480 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop40: 56,48 MiB, 59228160 bytes, 115680 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

==========
cat /etc/fstab

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
# / was on /dev/sda5 during installation
UUID=378a0a89-44e3-4eb9-82f1-cee5eae245f4 /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# /boot/efi was on /dev/sda3 during installation
UUID=7317-4D68  /boot/efi       vfat    umask=0077      0       1
/swapfile                                 none            swap    sw              0       0

I just need to keep the Windows installation. I could delete the Linux partitions without any problems (if this solves my problem).

There are still questions to consider. Apparently somewhere along the way an installer created an ESP, which means Efi System Partition, which is your #3. “EFI variables are not supported on this system.” and the absence of a /boot/efi entry in your fstab suggests Xubuntu it was installed in legacy mode and thus made no use of the ESP. However, we don’t know whether Windows is configured to boot in legacy mode, or EFI mode. Your lsblk output suggest the ESP is nevertheless being mounted to /boot/efi. So to provide more answers, please provide input/output from ls -lGg /boot/efi/EFI/*.

Whatever the way forward, if there is anything you need to keep on your Xubuntu installation, be sure you have it all saved elsewhere. The current #5 partition will need to be reformatted and/or replaced.

Is Windows currently bootable? If so, is it from your Xubuntu’s Grub menu, or is some other method being used, such as a BIOS BBS hotkey during POST?

If you can boot Windows and get it to report whether or not it is using UEFI booting that would be great.

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The output of the command:
ls -lGg /boot/efi/EFI/*

ls: cannot access '/boot/efi/EFI/*': Permission denied

Windows is currently bootable from the Xubuntu’s Grub menu.
Now I am going to check if Windows is using UEFI or not…

Hello.

Windows reports:

BIOS mode: Legacy.

Thank you for helping me!

Whenever someone presents a command for you to run, and it results in a permission or “not found” failure, you should feel free to retry it either by logging in as root, or prepending sudo to the command.

The simplest way forward would be to boot the installation media in legacy/BIOS mode. That mode is distinguishable from having booted in UEFI mode by the presence of 6 menu options at the bottom of the boot screen for configuring various installation setup options. Booted in UEFI mode those don’t appear, and those who need such options must manually apply any desired.

In the partitioning phase you’ll want to designate that the current sda5 partition now hosting Xubuntu be used for openSUSE. It will be reformatted with the BTRFS filesystem unless you specify an alternate, such as EXT4. EXT4 is traditional and simpler in capability. BTRFS is more sophisticated and provides automatic snapshotting along with easy rollback capability. In the bootloader phase you’ll need to find and select the checkbox to enable “probe foreign OS” in order to ensure Windows appears in the openSUSE Grub boot menu.

If openSUSE is expected to become your primary OS, I suggest now would be an ideal time to consider either reallocating available space on the current SSD to give more to Linux, or to acquire a larger SSD so as to keep Windows sized as is, while making considerably more space available to Linux. It would also be a good opportunity to switch from legacy/MBR partitioning and booting for UEFI/GPT, which is more reliable, safer from interference by Windows affecting boot processes, and may be required should you eventually wish to upgrade from Windows 10 to something newer. A larger disk would also make it more reasonably feasible to create a multiple filesystem arrangement for openSUSE, to segregate personal data from operating system. With the ~76G of space currently available for Linux, such a division would not be recommended if you wish to use the default BTRFS filesystem for the OS, and even using EXT4, which doesn’t require space for snapshots, it might nevertheless take considerable mental effort to decide how much space would be most appropriate for each division, depending on how much software you use, and how much personal data you expect to keep instantly available.

if you want to replace i think its just get the partition of xubuntu do a clean install of the partition to put opensuse i think this is my point of view

Thank you for responding and helping me!

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