Re installing opensuse, partition help

Hello, I have a Samsung SF 510 with dual boot windows and linux. I installed opensuse 2 years ago and now there’s problems with the system (missing files, etc) so I thought that I might as well do a fresh installation of the newer version.

I don’t want to mess up my windows partition so I just need to make sure everything is right.

During installation, this is the summary:

Changes to partitioning:
Format partition dev/sda6 (10 gb) for / with ext 4
use /dev/sda5 as swap
set mount point of /dev/sda8 to /home
set mount point of /dev/sda1 to /windows/C
set mount point of /dev/sda2 to /windows/D
set mount point of /dev/sda7 to /windows/E
set mount point of /dev/sda9 to /windows/F

What does the above mean? If I click proceed, will it ruin the windows installation?

Thanks!

No. It wont mess up Windows. In the first line it tells you

Format partition dev/sda6 (10 gb) for / with ext 4
None of the other lines have format. The rest pertaining to Windows is just mount points, that is, how it would be recognized in Linux. Read this for more info; Mount point definition by The Linux Information Project

On 2012-05-12 23:26, techcrium wrote:
> What does the above mean? If I click proceed, will it ruin the windows
> installation?

I think not. You could do an “fdisk -l” in Linux to list the partitions you
currently have, and compare with the proposal: it is strange that partition
7 and 9 are Windows, and 8 for Linux.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Yes, it might look a bit strange, but as this system seems to have quite a story behind itself, including an openSUSE one, I guess one can trust the installer that it found out that there is an Linux file system there (probably ext2/3) and that the whole there very much looks like something that was earlier used mounted on* /home* (or even saw that it was lastly mounted on /home, IIRC the last mount point used is stored in the file system of, among others, ext. type).

I trust the installer very much on this point.

IIRC the last mount point used is stored in the file system

It is. *tune2fs -l *will give you what the last mount point was amongst a lot of other information:

boven:~ # tune2fs -l /dev/sda3 | grep Last
Last mounted on:          /home
Last mount time:          Sun May 13 10:36:49 2012
Last write time:          Sun May 13 10:36:49 2012
Last checked:             Mon Apr  4 14:08:49 2011
boven:~ # 

Thus it is very easy for he installer to check:

  1. Does a partition have type 83 (Linux).
  2. Is there indeed a file system on it of a type typical Linux (the ext2/3/4 series or Reiser or …).
  3. What was the last mountpoint of that file system.

In theory you can have more of those last mounted on ./home on the disks of a system, or even on a system disk (the one the installer works on), may be the installer then takes the most recent for it’s proposal and leaves it to the system manager behind the installation to redress (as it of course allways leaves the final decision to the human behind the installation).

You have an option to import the previous partitioning and mount table. It offers you to format the system volume (/), accept and you should be fine, i.e. root is gonna be formatted, /home and all others remain intact.

On 2012-05-13 13:06, Knurpht wrote:
>
> You have an option to import the previous partitioning and mount table.
> It offers you to format the system volume (/), accept and you should be
> fine, i.e. root is gonna be formatted, /home and all others remain
> intact.

Yes, it imports fstab and passwd file.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)