Questions before I install openSUSE.

Hi,

I’m really looking forward to get openSUSE installed on my desktop soon.

But There are some questions I need to ask before doing the actual installation.

  1. Dual Booting
    Yesterday, I was researching about openSUSE dualbooting with Windows XP…

Most results say that it does it automatically and I don’t have to configure a single thing…

But some threads, however, say you need to configure the partition and create space for openSUSE, manually…

From this thread: Dual boot: Windows XP & openSuSE 10.2 - testmy.net resource / tool
(Please read it)

I was reading the thread form Installation/11.0 DVD Install - openSUSE and it says, you don’t need to configure anything, it does it automatically…

Which do I follow?

  1. Checking MD5 SUM??

I was reading the installation thread: NEWBIES - Suse-11.0 Pre-installation – PLEASE READ - openSUSE Forums

Until I got to the MD5 SUM part…I got stuck…

The theory here is one downloads the appropriate .iso file(s). For those who already have linux, one then runs “md5sum file.iso” (or something like that) in a konsole, against the downloaded file (which in my example I called “file.iso”). This will give an md5 checksum value. One then compares that to the checksum that is on the download web site. If they don’t match, you have a problem, and you MUST download again.

I don’t get a single thing written there…

And what do I do once I got MD5 SUM downloaded??

Thanks in advance!

PS. The DVD took me a Day and a half to download!! (I didnt leave the computer on overnight).

ONE MORE QUESTION:

I have Ubuntu right now, I’m going to delete it with partition Magic, then Install openSUSE…

It won’t effect the bootloader and stuff right?

For
installing openSUSE with Windows XP there is an article that has been recommended in other posts located here:
http://susefaq.sourceforge.net/faq/inst_winxp1.html

If you already have Ubuntu installed, then I would just run the openSUSE installer and when it gets to the partitioning step point the root ("/") to the Ubuntu partition and check to reformat the partition. No need to "manually " modify the partition scheme via Partition Magic if it already exists.

If you want to modify the size or format or break it into a couple partitions you can do that from the openSUSE installer.

If you do not have a boot partition (~100MB, mount as /boot) and you modify the linux partition (like from Partition Magic) that may mess up grub enough that you cannot boot into anything, even Windows. Not until, that is, you go through a lot of avoidable work.

If you have a separate /boot partition then so long as you don’t mess with it, you’ll have the choice to boot into Windows even if the Linux installation or partition is totally messed up.

How many partitions do you have on your system?

When I’ve dual-booted my machines, I would have a partition scheme kind-of like this

  1. Windows XP (~10GB)
  2. /boot (~100 MB)
  3. /home (as much space as want, these are your files)
  4. / (the root directory, or the partition for the whole Linux operating system but at least ~8 GB +)
  5. /swap (~ 2x your RAM)

I put the /home before the root because I’ve had Wndows mess up my partition tables and I lost my partitions after a certain point. This was a while ago, and I think it was because of a not-good-burn of a CD.

Feel free to ask as many questions as you want before-hand. Once you feel comfortable with partitioning the rest is a piece of cake.

md5sum

The theory here is one downloads the appropriate .iso file(s). For those who already have linux, one then runs “md5sum file.iso” (or something like that) in a konsole, against the downloaded file (which in my example I called “file.iso”). This will give an md5 checksum value. One then compares that to the checksum that is on the download web site. If they don’t match, you have a problem, and you MUST download again.

What they mean is that you open a terminal window, navigate to the directory your .iso file was downloaded into and type

md5sum name_of_file.iso

and it will come back with a hash number.

Chances are there is a reference somewhere where you downloaded the .iso file from regarding the md5sum check number (it’s a long hash number). You compare what comes up in your terminal after running that command to what is one the web page and if they match exactly then you are good-to-go. If they do not, then somehow your downloaded file is incomplete or something is incorrect.

This may not mean you cannot install it but it’s no fun to go through the process only to have some error pop up and stop the installation or worse… doesn’t recognize there is an issue until you are actually using the newly installed operating system and something doesn’t work right :eek:

I’ve had that happen to me. It’s not fun.

Another word of advice, if there is a “check media” option at boot-up I would go through that. The md5sum will check the file you downloaded is good, and the media check will make sure the burn is good.

That’s a long complicated reply…

I’m not sure about my partition…how do I check it?

I have Ubuntu installed on my D Drive, sharing 50% of the partition…
I’m not sure why It didn’t install on C Drive, maybe because D has a larger space…

Hey man, I just want to make sure it’s a clean remove and installation…

So i think the best way is to remove Ubuntu with Partition Magic first…

BTW, you haven’t answered my question…The SUSE installation separate the partition automatically right?

And when I delete the Ubuntu’s partition, will the grub loader still be there?

If yes, because I have Windows on the C drive, not on the D, Will opensuse install on C, separate the Windows partition…or D and format all the files I have on that Drive?

Thanks a lot.

You don’t need to use Partition tools like P Magic
You can just use the Suse partitioner
Forget Automatic!!
read this guide
Partitioning/Install Guide - openSUSE Forums

It’s a lot of writing and pretty complicated to follow…
I’m really new here.

How do I get to custom partitioning???

Do I just click change>Partitioning when I get to installing settings?

And will Ubuntu Show up once I get here?

So i get the idea…But can you just explain to me in simpler words on how do I set up partition so It removes Ubuntu and not the entire D Drive.

I also don’t get the mount point parts.

I get a bit of the bootloader part, that I have to install the bootloader on the D Drive…So once I’m at installing options, do i Change>Booting or something?

I get the bootloader part. But not sure about the adjusting part.

How do i know if the settings to boot Windows is correct or not…
I’m confused and stuck here.

If possible, can you explain the whole thing shorter and easier to understand so that a person with no computer knowlege would understand…

Appriciate your help.

Sorry if i’m being too stupid.

Thanks.

custom: follow the installer thru the first few basic ?'s and it probes your system - it will offer a proposal - choose ‘create partition setup’ (left button of the two), then look for custom partitioning for experts only

you will see all your drives and their partitions

you need to know yourself what is in each section: if you don’t - find out

mount points are basically where the partition will be in your tree

the only one you need to worry about is your windows partiton if you have one
which will be /windows
doesn’t really matter what you call it
just remember the /
you set all this in the partitioner

follow my guide

and if you have two HD’s
think carefully about it, and where you put grub and the boot order of your drives

Thanks a bunch.

That helped me a lot!

Appreciate your help!

One more question…how do I put the boot order?

Yes, I have 2 HDs and I have Windows.

boot order is in bios
normally you need to hit delete or esc at boot to enter bios

set the drive with suse on as 1st hd

remember in the yast partitioner you can identify your windows hd, because it will show the ntfs partition (some windows installs might be FAT32) and this assumes you understand what I mean.
Remember how Yast identifies your drives! ie; hda1 or hda2

if your suse drive is say: hda1
remember to install grub to the mbr of hda1

check my help again for more info
and post for help if grub doesn’t boot windows after install (this way you should be able to switch HD boot order in bios if you really need to get to windows) that is until we get the grub doing the job right

I think I should just get GParted.

It’s much simpler, since I’m a newbie.

And yes, thanks for your help. You’re a real pro!
I which you live here in Thailand so you can just drop off at my home to set it up =P.

thanks again. Appreciate all your help!

Yast will let you do all you can do with GParted and I would still advise you to use the custom partitioner when doing the Suse install, because you still have to set all the mount points.

But as you wish.

Come back if you have problems!

i was planing to daul boot vista and opensuse 10.3 with a 360gb sata hard drive but i dont have the usual vista dvd if anythig goes wrong just the packard bell dvd tha will not let me change partitionsa freind did it with xp though

Before I do anything, I’ll keep asking questions if I find anything unclear…

I’ll try the virtual machine first, then if it works, it works!

But i’m not sure if you can dual boot and stuff on Virtual Box.

I’m looking forward to see a nice, polished operating system by Monday! and hope I don’t get any problems!!

So I’ll just concentrate on the mount points and stuff…

I guess If I’m still confused with stuff after a while, I think I need someone like you, to Remote assistant my computer! If you can =P

What’s the worst case? Unable to boot a single thing? Even Windows? Go though Recovery console and fix MBR??

Thanks.

I think I need someone like you, to Remote assistant my computer! If you can =P
Not a good idea, you don’t know who you are letting in.

From what you say, it sounds like you will be running Virtual Box in Windows?

not sure if you can dual boot and stuff on Virtual Box
Yes. And it will certainly give you the opportunity to practice. Though a little knowledge is required to make the most of systems you install in VBox. You will need to create a fixed size virtual drive. Lets say you want to simulate a duel boot with xp and suse. you need say 3gig for xp and say 5gig for suse live cd install (more if you use the dvd).
Start by using a partitioner cd to create partitions like this:
sda1;xp NTFS 3Gig
sda2;suse, ext3, / (/= the mount point which is called ‘root’)
sda3;suse, ext3, /home (your user files and settings)
sda4;suse swap, swap (no mount points)

if you then install xp and late move on to suse
when you install suse you will actually be writing the bootloader - grub to the MBR of sda. When you do your real install you will not put grub here but:
In your case, the for real install will have 2 HD’s, probably like this sda and sdb, and you will set sdb a first boot in bios (that’s assuming sda holds windows) and install grub to the MBR of sdb.

What’s the worst case? Unable to boot a single thing? Even Windows? Go though Recovery console and fix MBR??

If you can make a backup all the better. It’s unlikely you will loose all you data though. Just watch for the options in yast ‘do not format’ - by default do not format should be selected anyway
The mount poins / and /home are available in the drop down, but for setting the mount point for your windows installation/partition you will have to type it /windows

If you have a proper windows cd, then restoring your MBR on that drive, if it gets damaged is easy - using fixmbr
but you will be/should be putting grub on the other HD

No, I meant my actual computer.

Why can’t Yast manage the partition automatically like Ubuntu’s installer?
That would help beginners a lot.

Or make a Wubi installer for openSUSE.

Why can’t Yast manage the partition automatically like Ubuntu’s installer?

It can, and it will present you with such when it has done the initial probe, but I never find it gives me something I would be happy with.

I have basically already provided you with all the info you need, it’s really not that complicated.

It isn’t that complicated, ture.

But if it could be easier to manage and understandable and more automatic, more ppl would use openSUSE…Installation is one of the reasons. Thats why so many ppl uses ubuntu…no need any knowledge on installing!

Anyway, thanks for your help.

With several users, some use more space than others.

Need we do anything to adjust size available for each in their /home or will it adjust automatically ?

What are the different “Existing Local User” - “Details” - “Groups”

Default user group is “users”

What or when do individual users need ticked/selected other groups ?

Some seen:

users (not ticked)
bin (not ticked)
cdrom (not ticked)
dialout (Ticked)
disk (not ticked)
floppy (not ticked)
ftp (not ticked)
games (not ticked)
mail (not ticked)
news (not ticked)
public (not ticked)
video (Ticked)
www (not ticked)

Appreciate if Basic concepts can explain what these are and what selecting does.

Also appreciate explanation for “Plug Ins” then “Manage User Quota”

.