Problem shutting down Opensuse 12.1

Hello,

I have installed opensuse 12.1 on a Thinkpad and I am not able to shutdown the laptop. Everytime I do shut down the system restarts. Any ideas why this is hapenning. I googled and I see that using the command “shutdown -h -P now” will solve the problem. But it is not getting fixed with this command as well.

can someone please help me with this?

Thanks in advance.

-Madhan

It is probably an incompatibility between the software and the computer’s ACPI.

Check whether there are BIOS settings that change the ACPI configuration. Perhaps you can find something that works.

The last time that I had a computer with that problem, I would just reboot. Then I would power off when presented with the boot menu. I set the boot timeout fairly high, to give me plenty of time for the power off.

I currently have a computer with the opposite problem. It won’t reboot, but it will shutdown. If I try a reboot, it hangs. So, on that machine, I try to remember to always do a shutdown, then power on again if I really wanted to reboot.

On 2012-07-21 05:56, nrickert wrote:
>
> It is probably an incompatibility between the software and the
> computer’s ACPI.
>
> Check whether there are BIOS settings that change the ACPI
> configuration. Perhaps you can find something that works.
>
> The last time that I had a computer with that problem, I would just
> reboot. Then I would power off when presented with the boot menu. I
> set the boot timeout fairly high, to give me plenty of time for the
> power off.

You must remember to report all those cases in bugzillas.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

>
> I have installed opensuse 12.1

-=WELCOME=- new poster!!

it seems you speak of a recent install, if so and you have not yet, be
sure and load in all the updates…i think one of them probably solves
the problem you are having…

you don’t mention if you are an old time openSUSE user or if this is
your first move into Linux…so, if these instructions seem overly
instructive to you it is because i will now assume you to be very very
new to both openSUSE and Linux [you may want to print this out so it is
available during the process]:

to update your system with all the security patches and major bug fixes
that have occurred since the 12.1 install image was frozen, do these
things while connected to the internet:

  • open YaST (find it in the main menu with a search blank)

  • when the YaST Control Center window opens, it will have “Software”
    highlighted on the left, so click in the right pane on “Online Update”
    (known as YOU)

  • a new window will open up…it WILL take some time, be patient…
    resist the temptation of clicking the “Abort” button…LOTs of stuff is
    going on in the background…eventually all activity will stop in the
    window and a list of updates arranged as both “security” and
    “recommended” are shown on the upper left pane…

at least for now, you need to accept all which are suggested by
YaST…if you have not updated before you may be shocked at the
amount…don’t worry it really is necessary…and, most of the changes
replace software already on your system, so it won’t really add much
to the drive…

so, click the “Accept” button…and, go for a walk…depending on the
speed of your connection to the net, and the speed of the servers you
are downloading from it could take a while…maybe half an hour, i don’t
know…the IMPORTANT thing is do not interrupt YaST during the download
or afterwards…let it complete its task (doing that is a LOT easier
than recovering from a user aborted (and therefore botched) update…

you may (or may not) see a notification saying that the update will
require you to reboot…

in any event when the YaST Online Update has completed its work it will
either just disappear, or list an error message…IF it gives an error
message leave your machine running and post that back to this thread…

if there are no error messages try to shut down your system using the
menu…if that doesn’t work, try this:

  • hold down Ctrl and Alt keys and press F1

  • the display will switch to a full screen black terminal with a login
    prompt followed by a flashing cursor

  • type in


root

and press enter

  • the display will change and ask for your root password, give it…if
    you didn’t select a root password when you installed then you give *
    your password (which is for both you, and root)

note: you must type the password exactly as you did during
install…that is to say: mypassword is NOT the same as MYPASSWORD or
myPassword

  • when your password has been accepted, type

shutdown -h now

and press enter

  • you should see things happening on the screen during the orderly
    shutdown and power off

-if the machine does not shutdown as the result of that command, then
you can try to go back to the graphical user interface by doing this:
hold down the Ctrl and Alt keys and press F7…if you get back to your
normal window and can get back to the forum, tell us what happened…

  • when the machine has turned itself off, just boot it up again

  • and, i think when you next try a normal shut down, it will…give it a
    try…


dd

In my case, there’s no reason to report, since it isn’t likely to be “fixed” anyway.

The computer that would not shutdown has long since been scrapped. It was purchased in 1995. The ACPI interface has changed a lot since then.

The computer that won’t reboot is from 2004, and retired from active duty. I am using it only for testing (as in testing 12.2). It rebooted fine when I was running suse 10.1. I think it was at opensuse 11.0 that it stopped being able to reboot. I’ll note that it did reboot when I recently experimented with Arch. But it had the same problem of not rebooting with fedora and mint. This suggests that it might depend on a kernel compile time selection that is different between Arch and opensuse. But it is still not worth “fixing” unless it also affects a lot of other people.

On 2012-07-21 17:36, nrickert wrote:
> opensuse. But it is still not worth “fixing” unless it also affects a
> lot of other people.

Surely it affects more people, but most do not even post in forums. The silent majority.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Hello nrickert](http://forums.opensuse.org/members/nrickert.html),

I tried to see if something can be done on the BIOS using ACPI and not able to find a clue. Thanks for the help. I think I did something and this got fixed.

-Madhan

Hi DD,

I am new to linux. I tried to do an online update and it looks like its been already done and there are no updates. I tried to do the “shutdown -h now” on the command line and the laptop is powering off correctly now.

Not sure sure what was the problem earlier. I was trying GNOME with Cinnamon when I faced this problem. When I started using KDE this issue is fixed. Thanks again for your wonder assistance on this matter.

Best Regards,
-Madhan

Hi,

This issue is happening again. It worked once and it never worked again. So for now I am hibernating the Thinkpad, so that it halts. Any help on this still?

Best Regards,
-Madhan

I likely can not help directly.

But if you have not already done so, you could look inside /var/log/messages around time of shutdown, to see if it logs any messages that provide you a clue as to what is taking place in the shutdown sequence.

On 07/25/2012 06:56 AM, madhangc1 wrote:

> This issue is happening again. It worked once and it never worked
> again. So for now I am hibernating the Thinkpad, so that it halts. Any
> help on this still?

i think your problem is another view of this bug
https://bugzilla.novell.com/show_bug.cgi?id=731551

there are a lot of variables:
-was yours a fresh install
-was it an upgrade over an older install
-the screen goes black, but the machine runs on
-a green screen comes, and the machine runs on
-and several others

so, it is hard to know what exactly will help you, but in that bug
several work-arounds are discussed AND i think i would first try to boot
with systemV (rather than the default systemD

to do that, at first green screen during boot press F5 and select
“System V” see
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/10573557/12.1_Misc/12.1_F5_sysV.jpg

if that doesn’t help then i’d try some of the other work arounds (being
careful to know how to back track (back track from the above switch from
systemD to systemV is to just not press F5 next boot)

if that works for you then you can make the change persist through
following boots via:

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/10573557/systemV/add_systemV1.jpg
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/10573557/systemV/add_systemV2.jpg

let us know how you get on…


dd

I don’t know if I should “reply” or start a new thread.

I’m having a similar problem: my computer won’t shutdown. When I try, it goes semi-dark (the screen darkens as if it’s about to shutdown), but then it just hangs there indefinitely (I’ve given it 20 minutes before and it just stays there).

I’m on an install about a month old. It worked fine (including shutdown and shutdown reboot) for a while. But over the last day, there was one time it goes stuck in shutdown mode (I think when I had an unsaved program that I then went in and saved and closed manually in the darkened mode). But sense it hasn’t worked properly.

The workaround in terminal (sudo /sbin/shutdown -r now) DOES work for me, but it would be nice to get the whole thing working properly again. In particular, I like to use the session saver and have it remember 5-6 documents/programs to open for me when I reenter the GUI.

It looks like something became corrupted during the one time I didn’t shutdown properly.

Any ideas?

Thank you,

Rick

(If I should start a new thread, please let me know if I should repost entirely or if there is a better way to take this post and make it a new one.)

Try another user account and see if that one also has problems

It had the same problems. My system didn’t like one of the recent updates. I removed the last 2 days of updates and the problem went away.